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seen Sep 3 at 14:04

Student of many things.


Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
@jkerian You're right, I do realize that. I'm just starting this language, and I wanted to ask a question like that just to get a little of my bearings before I set into things with serious effort.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
The name is a very good point. I do understand your analogy. Really, I wasn't arguing that they're not worth learning. I know they are, and if it sounded like I meant otherwise then I misspoke. What I was seeking with an explanation, by way of analogy, was "Once I learn my capital letters, where will I be using them? How will they benefit me?"
Jul
13
awarded  Commentator
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
@AndrewGrimm To your question, I would say no. Somewhere below someone gave the example of towel, and that I would count as a loanword. If (made up example) you took horse and made it "horsiko", I would not call that a loanword, no. I mean I guess it's just how you want to define it, where your boundaries are. It's not a mathematical thing.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
I guess it's a matter of how much change it takes before you stop calling it a loanword. Maybe I'm against academia here, but for me it has to have much more than adapted spelling and pronunciation before I'll consider it to no longer be a blatant loanword. Maybe I'll ask this on Linguistics.SE! It's turning out to be a detailed question, it seems.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
Really? In your experience you saw more katakana than hiragana? That's interesting. Fantastic quote, by the way. Really funny and quite true.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
Why thank you for the keen explanation. And for the record, if one has a strong grasp on the language, there is a demarcation. It isn't a rule, per se, but it's there. Loanwords are completely unchanged. They've simply been stolen and added to our lexicon. A derived word is anglicised, so to speak. Amigo is very clearly not derived, while mortified is very clearly not a loanword. Here and there it can blur, but this is infrequently the case.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
I hate making unconstructive comments on SE, so forgive me, but it perplexes me that someone "with a background in linguistics" would suggest that English consists of 99% loanwords. I mean, by that logic, any language that derived from an earlier one consists of 99% loanwords, and therefore nearly all modern languages consist of 99% loanwords, particularly Western languages.
Jul
13
comment Why are the katakana important to learn?
That they are derived from foreign languages, more than four hundred years ago, does not make them loanwords. Very different. "Concerto" is a loanword. "Dental," derived from Latin "dentalis," is not a loanword. Of course, if you mean to say that many words in Japanese are derived from other languages, thus explaining the common usage of the katakana, it would be much more helpful to say that.
Jul
13
asked Why are the katakana important to learn?
Jul
12
awarded  Student
Jul
12
awarded  Scholar
Jul
12
accepted How to form the “chi” sound, and others?
Jul
12
comment What is the learning curve for learning Japanese writing?
@YOU "Einstein was a genius." "You mean Albert?"
Jul
12
comment How to form the “chi” sound, and others?
Oh. It really is that simple. Coming from an English perspective that's a very unusual way of breaking up a word, but now I see the principle.
Jul
12
awarded  Supporter
Jul
12
comment How to form the “chi” sound, and others?
Thanks! Makes sense. And "Mae"? And you ignored my edit. :[
Jul
12
suggested suggested edit on How to form the “chi” sound, and others?
Jul
12
comment How to form the “chi” sound, and others?
Good start for an answer. So is to equal to cho, and so on?
Jul
12
asked How to form the “chi” sound, and others?