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My name is Tsuyoshi Ito in English and 伊藤剛志 (いとうつよし) in Japanese. I am a native speaker of Japanese with a casual interest in languages. I have been living outside Japan for a few years, and my knowledge about trends in Japanese is likely to be outdated.

Aside: My secret goal is to keep being the top answerer in the tag “food.”


Oct
30
comment What to call the characters-based decoration found in many announce emails
飾り罫 (decorative frame of text) is read as かざりけい. It does not necessarily mean decorative frame represented as text. Probably there is no word which exactly describes decorative frame represented as text (either in Japanese or in English), if that is what you are asking.
Oct
30
comment What does 忘れたい人 mean?
That is exactly why I think your reasoning about 忘れたい女 is flawed. Your reasoning may be correct in some context, but we do not know the context.
Oct
30
comment What does 忘れたい人 mean?
I do not think that it is correct to appeal to the difference between たい and たがる without knowing the rest of the sentence. For example, もっと食べたい人はいますか (Is there anyone who wants to eat more? > Does any of you want to eat more?) is perfectly fine although the subject of 食べたい is not the speaker.
Oct
30
answered How many times should 「お」 and 「ご」 be used in a sentence?
Oct
30
comment The nuance of する
Basic words often have many meanings which are only loosely related, and this should not be surprising if you consider the meanings of basic words in English such as make and take. You can check dictionaries for different meanings of する (Daijisen lists 15 meanings), but it is probably more useful to learn them as you encounter the word in text. By the way, 口にする uses に because it means “bring to mouth” rather than “do something with mouth.”
Oct
30
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How to call the phenomenon where a rectangle Ϳ is shown because font misses glyph?
Oct
21
comment Does a word for vending machine shorter than 自販機 exist?
@dainichi: I did not think of the possibility that 自販機のジュース would give a similar number. From these numbers you wrote, I take back my words that calling the results "many" was a stretch. That does not match my gut feeling about the frequency, but that is a seperate matter.
Oct
20
comment What are slang terms for Japanese money?
It is not the matter of permission. I just suggested you improve your answer, because I thought that it was confusing to mix the words that mean money and the words that mean something related to money in one list when the question asked the former.
Oct
20
comment Does a word for vending machine shorter than 自販機 exist?
@dainichi: Google shows a little more than 100 pages that contain “自販のジュース” on the web. I am afraid that calling it “many examples” is a stretch, but some people use it.
Oct
20
comment Japanese equivalent of “Thanks anyway.”?
I am not sure. “Thanks anyway” in English is at least an expression for thanking, although it is a halfhearted thanking. 気持ちだけは受け取っておく does not even sound like an expression for halfhearted thanking. But the boundary between halfhearted thanking and admitting the effort is probably not as firm as I thought when I posted my previous comment.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
I am afraid that we went too long in comments of snailboat’s answer, so I will shut up here.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
@Darius Jahandarie: Thanks for the information. I think that there is no controversy to call the form before て as 連用形 when we take the historical point of view, but my understanding of user54609’s comments is that some linguists do not like that point of view, and in particular they do not like to treat 遊んで as “just” a sound variation of 遊びて. It is in that case that I do not know what to call the form before て.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
(2) I am not sure what the best way to call the form before て is, but if 遊んで and 優しくて are treated as the stem (asob-/yasasik-) + epenthetic -u- inserted sometimes + te, I am not sure how to call 優し in 優しそう. Also “inserted sometimes” seems a little unsatisfactory.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
@user54609: (1) 優しく強い means “kind and strong,” and I do not think that we can consider 優しく modifies 強い. It is true that 連用形 of adjectives sometimes modifies verbs or adjectives: 優しく抱く and 著しく強い, although 著しく is probably often considered as an adverb derived from 著しい. If we treat 著しく in 著しく強い as adjective, the syntactic distinction between 優しく強い (two predicates put side by side) and 著しく強い (the first modifies the second) only comes from semantics.
Oct
20
comment What is the origin of けれど, ければ, けど, etc?
I was not clear enough. By “clarify”, I meant “clarify by editing the question.” By the way, I hope that by now you understand that けれど and ければ are syntactically quite different in Modern Japanese.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
@user54609: (1) I am not sure what you mean by “it [優しく] is syntactically an adverb.” For example, I do not think that we can treat 優しく in ジョンは優しく強い syntactically as an adverb. If it is not clear, I think that it becomes clearer with different subjects: ジョンは優しく、ポールは強い. (2) 中止法 is not the only place where what I called the true 連用形 appears. Another place is before particle て, although it causes sound changes in case of consonant-stem verbs: 学んで (< 学びて), 見て, 優しくて, and so on.
Oct
20
comment What is the origin of けれど, ければ, けど, etc?
I think I know what you are talking about, but can you clarify what ければ is?
Oct
20
comment Japanese equivalent of “Thanks anyway.”?
I am not sure if this is really an expression for thanking. My feeling is that it is more like admitting the effort and/or the good intent rather than thanking for it.
Oct
20
comment Why do things which attach to the 連用形 of 動詞 attach to the stem of 形容詞?
@user54609: I am afraid that that explanation does not make sense. If the stem of 優しい is yasasik-, how do you explain 優し in 優しそう/優しすぎる? The reason I suggested to distinguish the stem possibly with epenthetic -i (e.g. 学び in 学びそう/学びすぎる and 優し in 優しそう/優しすぎる) and the true 連用形 form (e.g. 学び and 優しく used in 中止法) in the first place is that they are different in case of adjectives.
Oct
19
comment What are slang terms for Japanese money?
Among the words you listed, I do not think that ドル箱 counts as an answer to the current question. It does not mean money but it means something which produces money.