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Jan
11
comment Why is domo used also to say hello?
In which context does どうも mean “very”?
Jan
11
comment plain + とき + plain or polite?
This is basically correct, but probably the most important information for the OP is that the existence of 〜とき clause does not affect whether the main clause should be in the polite form or not.
Jan
11
answered Difference between くらいなら ~ のほうがましだ and くらいなら ~ ほうがいい
Jan
10
comment 文の組み立て Question about word order
Does the book really say いかんにも? That looks like a typo to me.
Jan
10
answered 四角と正方形はどう違うの?~(What's the difference between 四角 and 正方形?)
Jan
5
revised What is 床下? (picture attached)
added a note
Jan
5
comment What is 床下? (picture attached)
正直なところ、自信がなくなってきました。そもそも厳密さが要求される場面ではこんな言い方はしないのではないかという気も……。
Jan
5
comment What is 床下? (picture attached)
Hmm, now I am not so sure about what I wrote I was pretty sure in my answer….
Jan
5
answered What is 床下? (picture attached)
Jan
4
comment 「〜したことがある」 vs 「〜したことがあった」
This simple answer might be useful for the OP, but it is not a complete explanation. In particular, it does not explain why we can say 仕事で大阪に引っ越す前、大阪を訪れたことが1度だけある.
Jan
3
comment ない vs 無い: Negative ある vs adjective?
I cannot tell what distinction you are trying to make. The word ない as in the negation of ある is an adjective, is written as 無い when written with kanji, and has polite forms ありません and ないです (although using ないです as the polite form of the negation of ある is colloquial).
Dec
22
answered 跳び箱 as a synonym for a obstacle?
Dec
22
comment Possible use of isolated し?
In the Japanese grammar as is taught at school in Japan, both ます形 and て形 are considered to be two different forms of 連用形, because they were the same form in Classical Japanese. (This might be different from how the Japanese grammar is taught when people learn Japanese as a foreign language, though.) So you are right that the 逃し in 逃しちゃった is the て形 of 逃す, but you have to be careful when you say it is not 連用形.
Dec
22
comment Usage of の as nominalizer
Sorry if this does not apply to you, but just in case, let me point out that some people seem to believe that translating a sentence in one language into a deliberately unnatural sentence in another language for the sake of unnaturalness somehow helps understanding the grammar of the original language. It never does. What might help is translation which preserves some grammatical properties of the original sentence, sacrificing the naturalness of the resulting sentence. But this is completely different from making the translation unnatural without purpose.
Dec
22
comment Usage of の as nominalizer
I am not criticizing the awkwardness of “That he will come is a thing I know” as an English sentence. I am criticizing that the structure of this sentence does not correspond to the structure of 彼が来るのを知っている at all, whereas the structure of “I know that he will come” exactly corresponds to that of 彼が来るのを知っている. (cont’d)
Dec
22
comment Relative question
@Splikie: First, extracting the part after の as a head without also extracting the part before it is certainly problematic, so your last example does not work. As for extracting just the part before の, I think that it is possible in most cases. However, there is a catch. Because extracting the part before の is rarer than extracting the subject or the object before を, it might be more easily misinterpreted. If the resulting sentence is unlikely to be correctly interpreted, the sentence is not very useful even if there is no strict rule that prohibits the extraction of the part before の.
Dec
21
awarded  Revival
Dec
21
answered Relative question
Dec
21
comment Usage of の as nominalizer
彼が来るのを知っている means “I know that he will come.” You got the tense of 彼が来る wrong. Moreover, I cannot see why “That he will come is a thing I know” should be considered to be a direct translation of 彼が来るのを知っている. In my opinion, “I know that he will come” is much more direct as a translation of 彼が来るのを知っている.
Dec
21
comment Causative relative sentence
Translation check is off topic. See meta.japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/796/….