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My name is Tsuyoshi Ito in English and 伊藤剛志 (いとうつよし) in Japanese. I am a native speaker of Japanese with a casual interest in languages. I have been living outside Japan for a few years, and my knowledge about trends in Japanese is likely to be outdated.

Aside: My secret goal is to keep being the top answerer in the tag “food.”


Jun
2
answered ありがとうございます vs. ありがとうございました
Jun
2
comment Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
Just in case, in my previous comment, “if they are so close friends that the MC does not use the sentence 3” should read “… the sentence 1.”
Jun
2
comment Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
@YOU: Thanks. Possibly, but it is hard for me to answer definitely, because (1) the difference between sentences 1 and 3 are subtle, (2) if they are so close friends that the MC does not use the sentence 3, then the MC will probably just say something like 今日は京都大学の田中先生が来ています, and (3) I am not a grammarian and I do not have any grammar book of Japanese within my reach (ugh). @repecmps: Thanks.
Jun
2
comment Which verbs have 辞書形 (dictionary forms) that look like ~ます conjugations?
@makdad: I had thought so before I read Derek’s answer, but after reading it, it seems difficult to find any other examples.
Jun
2
answered Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
Jun
2
comment Can somebody explain the various words and combinations thereof used for thanking?
I can at least confirm that these five combinations are correct and all the other combinations of these three words are incorrect. Clearly there are many other words to express thanks, but what you listed are the most often used (I think).
Jun
2
comment Usage of なんて and なんか as emphasis.
About 彼女が結婚したなんてちっとも知らなかった, I do not think that the speaker considers “her marriage” unimportant. It sounds more like expressing surprise in the same was as the use of ちっとも (at all). But I agree with your grammar book in the first and the third examples in the question.
Jun
2
answered Is there a rule for when to use くらい vs ぐらい?
Jun
2
comment When do you use 下さい as opposed to ください
To make sure, this is not about the correctness but the matter of style and tendency. Some people just like to state everything as a rule, but it is completely acceptable to write ください in a request for an item. Writing 下さい in asking someone to do something is not rare but may look slightly old-fashioned.
Jun
2
answered Is the use of 先生 and similar titles context sensitive?
Jun
2
comment Usage of なんて and なんか as emphasis.
“3枚のレポート” probably means a report of three pages long (because three reports would be “3本のレポート”), but this is tangential to this question.
Jun
2
comment What are the origins of ヶ?
Me either, except in a dictionary. :)
Jun
2
comment How should I select what first-person pronoun to use?
Because わたし and わたくし are two different pronunciations of the same kanji 私 (and they are different in formality as you said), if you discuss the difference between the two, it is better to write them in hiragana.
Jun
2
comment Passive-transitive-verb vs. Intransitive-verb (他動詞の受け身 vs. 自動詞)
(2) I find both 本に教えられた and 本から教わった acceptable, but both are (kind of) personification. Probably the speaker is identifying the book with its author. I think that the usual (non-personifying) way to state “I learned how to use transitive verbs from a book” is 私は他動詞の使い方を本で習った.
Jun
2
comment Passive-transitive-verb vs. Intransitive-verb (他動詞の受け身 vs. 自動詞)
(1) I think I agree with you that 田中さんに教えられた has a stronger focus on someone’s actively teaching than 田中さんに教わった. However, it seems to me that 教わった still has some focus on the action of teaching when you compare it to, say, 田中さんから習った. (more)
Jun
2
comment What are the origins of ヶ?
Note that the character is the simplified version of 個, and that the form 个 is very rare in Japanese.
Jun
2
comment Can {X-eba X hodo Y} clause pattern be shortened to {X hodo Y}?
@syockit: (cont’d) A possible (retrospective) reason might be because X is an adjective in this case. I noticed that at least in some usages of “X hodo Y” that means “It’s Y to the extent of X” that I can think of right now, X is always either a noun or a verb. But I am not sure if this reasoning is correct.
Jun
2
comment Can {X-eba X hodo Y} clause pattern be shortened to {X hodo Y}?
@syockit: This equally applies to “X-eba X hodo Y.” The form “X-eba X hodo Y” is unambiguous because, as you noticed, “X hodo Y” has another meaning. But if I see 近いほど届かない (chikai hodo todokanai) in a poem or a lyric, I would somehow understand it as the same meaning as 近ければ近いほど届かない (chiakereba chikai hodo todokanai) without fear of ambiguity. I began wondering why. (more)
Jun
1
comment How can I say “Right now”, or “At that exact moment”?
I have never heard 今どころ to mean “right now” or “currently,” but I am happy to see examples. The answer contained other errors, too. I downvoted the answer and explained the reasons for the downvote, and the user who posted it deleted it.
Jun
1
comment How can I say “Right now”, or “At that exact moment”?
@Kdansky: No, ちょうど今 is a usual phrase to describe “exactly now,” and it can refer to the very near past, too (just like “just now”).