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My name is Tsuyoshi Ito in English and 伊藤剛志 (いとうつよし) in Japanese. I am a native speaker of Japanese with a casual interest in languages. I have been living outside Japan for a few years, and my knowledge about trends in Japanese is likely to be outdated.

Aside: My secret goal is to keep being the top answerer in the tag “food.”


Jun
8
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
Thanks for the update. Indeed, a possible connection between 蝶よ花よ and 月よ星よ is interesting.
Jun
8
answered IT system renewal: Can I say 更新 for “renewal”?
Jun
8
revised ~うございます - keigo い-adjectives
fixed typos and changed notation a little
Jun
8
comment ~うございます - keigo い-adjectives
@Ignacio: Ah, your explanation of ありがたく makes sense.
Jun
8
comment ~うございます - keigo い-adjectives
@istrasci: どういたしまして。
Jun
8
answered ~うございます - keigo い-adjectives
Jun
8
comment “to make a telephone call”
When was 電話をかける replaced by 電話する?! Since I use both, this question makes me feel old….
Jun
8
comment When do you use 下さい as opposed to ください
@Mark: I have never said that there is no difference between ください and 下さい. I am saying that they are interchangeable as long as correctness is concerned.
Jun
8
comment When do you use 下さい as opposed to ください
@Mark: “Well there is something to be said about what the correct grammar usage AND what is really used by natives.” You are talking about something different. I consider that ください and 下さい are interchangeable as long as correctness is concerned. Compare this with, say, 切る (to cut) and 着る (to wear), which are not interchangeable at the level of correctness. Some native speakers may consider neither pair as interchangeable at the level of correctness, but I guess that most people consider the former interchangeable and the latter not interchangeable as long as correctness is concerned.
Jun
7
comment What to say after someone sneezes
@Alenanno: Wow. Sorry, I did not realize that!
Jun
7
comment What's the standard for making plurals of Japanese words in English?
@YOU: It is a pity that that question focuses on whether loanwords should be pluralized or not instead of why some loanwords are actually pluralized and the others are not.
Jun
7
comment What to say after someone sneezes
This may be outside the language topic, but yes, there is a saying “一ほめられ、二そしられ、三ほれられ、四かぜひく” (one sneeze means someone is praising you, two means someone is speaking ill of you, three means someone is falling in love with you, four means you caught cold) (this is the version I know, but other variations also exist).
Jun
7
comment How did “little tsu” become a lengthener?
Not できなつた (which is ungrammatical) but できなかつた. In the modern language, できなかつた is written as できなかった, and it is the past form of できない (cannot). The road traffic act uses big つ because it was made before the Heisei era. I have no idea why they did not switch the orthography in written laws much earlier, if that is your question.
Jun
7
comment How did “little tsu” become a lengthener?
Yes. For an example of use of a big つ in a law for 促音, search できなかつた in, say, 道路交通法 (the road traffic act).
Jun
7
comment How did “little tsu” become a lengthener?
It is true that “っ” is related to “つ” (see nevan’s answer), but there are also hundreds of words where a “っ” stands for く: 学校 (がっこう), 作家 (さっか), and so on. So I am not sure if your answer explains the origin of “っ” correctly.
Jun
7
comment How did “little tsu” become a lengthener?
The transition from つ to っ in the written Japanese is much earlier than the Heisei era. The footnote in Wikipedia you are referring to is about the letters used in laws.
Jun
7
comment What is the difference between 〜となる and 〜になる?
It is true that some people (including me :)) consider this usage of となります/になります to be incorrect, unless it means a change (of the allowed payment methods in this case). Some of them even say that they are annoyed by this usage. On the other hand, this usage is quite common nowadays, and its meaning is understood, so it seems to be a moot point discussing whether it is “correct” or not. All I can say is that I would avoid (or at least try to avoid) this usage and that I would not recommend this usage to others, but this is just a personal preference.
Jun
7
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
Looking forward to the outcome!
Jun
7
comment What is the meaning and etymology of 蝶よ花よ?
I saw this claim a lot on the web, too, but is there any authoritative source that claims it? 蝶 and 花 were brought to Japanese as てふ (ちょう) and か, and I cannot see any explanation why they might have been brought as different sounds only in the case of ちやほや. This makes me suspect that this is yet another groundless claim floating around on the web.
Jun
7
awarded  Beta