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My name is Tsuyoshi Ito in English and 伊藤剛志 (いとうつよし) in Japanese. I am a native speaker of Japanese with a casual interest in languages. I have been living outside Japan for a few years, and my knowledge about trends in Japanese is likely to be outdated.

Aside: My secret goal is to keep being the top answerer in the tag “food.”


Jun
10
comment When can I exchange くださる for いただく in expressions of gratitude?
@repecmps: This question is about the fact that using くださる and using いただく are similar in expressions of thanks. It could have been covered by an answer in the other question, but it is not. We can merge this to the other one, but I think that this is a sufficiently different question.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
I changed my opinion and now I agree with what you wrote in this post. Sorry for causing a lot of noise in the comments to your question.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
(1) I was not talking about the resolution. You give the necessary context in the question text accurately, and the picture does not seem to be necessary to ask this question. (2) I did not realize the image had an alt attribute! (At least it is not shown with Firefox unless you choose “View Image Info” from the context menu or change the browser setting.)
Jun
10
comment When can I exchange くださる for いただく in expressions of gratitude?
Related (not a dupe): Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
I thought that it violates the minimal extent of use (policy 3b) and the specification of source (item 2 of the image use policy).
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
Oh, and thank you for asking on Meta Stack Overflow: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/94645/…
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
If this were a Wikipedia article, this use would not be allowed. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Fair_use#Policy I do not think that the Stack Exchange network has a similar policy, but the rationale written there sounds quite reasonable.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
@Louis: According to the pages you and Ken cited, profit or non-profit is among the many deciding factors, but I do not know if it is the deciding factor in this particular case.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
@YOU: I think you have misread the linked page. It does not say that a use is considered fair whenever it is for nonprofit educational purposes. And I do not even know if this website is considered as nonprofit. At least the Stack Overflow Internet Services, Inc. is a company for profit, not a non-profit organization.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
@Ken, @Louis: Maybe you are right. But (1) I know almost nothing about the US copyright law and I cannot tell if it is fair use or not, and (2) although I know that Stack Overflow Internet Services, Inc. is a company based in the US, I do not know if it is sufficient to follow the US laws. Many users are from Japan, for example.
Jun
10
comment What does the final て in 待ってて signify?
I started to be worried about copyright issues. Can you check if posting a comic like this is allowed or not?
Jun
10
comment why is it that some 形容動詞 accepts の after it while some only accepts な after it?
Just in case, I said 特別の can be used, but I did not say anything about 特殊の. Off the top of my head, 特殊の sounds strange to me, but I will not rule out the possibility that it is used in some contexts.
Jun
10
answered Since Japanese already had several words for rice why was “ライス” (raisu) borrowed from English?
Jun
10
revised Since Japanese already had several words for rice why was “ライス” (raisu) borrowed from English?
typo
Jun
9
comment translation for “It serves as a good reminder for me”?
I still think that this is a question about pure translation, but I am happy to be convinced otherwise. If anyone has an opinion about it, please post on meta.
Jun
9
comment Can 【~たら】 be a short form of 【~てから】?
What do you mean by “E stem (以前系 izenkei)”? In my knowledge of the modern Japanese grammar, the forms before ば is called 仮定形 (かていけい) (but I am not sure how foreign learners usually learn verb forms). The Classical Japanese has a verb form called 已然形 (いぜんけい), but its use is different.
Jun
9
comment IT system renewal: Can I say 更新 for “renewal”?
@makdad: I am not sure whether 改善 usually involves processes. For example, it is usual to say 川の水質を改善する (かわのすいしつをかいぜんする; improve the water quality of a river): see e.g. this page. I think that 改善 implies that something was poor quality before the improvement, so it may or may not be suitable in Nicolas’s situation.
Jun
9
comment At work, when is it not ok to finish an email with どうぞよろしくお願いします?
Reading the comments, I removed the [corporate-japanese] tag. If it was not the right action, please feel free to revert the tag edit, perhaps explaining the reason.
Jun
9
revised At work, when is it not ok to finish an email with どうぞよろしくお願いします?
edited tags
Jun
9
comment Does the (USA) English metaphor “Unable to see the forest for the trees” keep its meaning if translated verbatim into Japanese?
About whether the English phrase in question is a cliché (=an stereotyped expression) or an idiom (a phrase which means something other than its literal meaning): If you want to claim that it is a cliché, you certainly can do so. But if you make a claim, you have to be prepared for the possibility of being objected. If you do not want a discussion whether it is a cliché or not, it is unwise to use the word cliché in the first place. I think that calling it an idiom is neutral, but if you do not agree, you can use “phrase” or “expression” which is hopefully not controversial at all.