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My name is Tsuyoshi Ito in English and 伊藤剛志 (いとうつよし) in Japanese. I am a native speaker of Japanese with a casual interest in languages. I have been living outside Japan for a few years, and my knowledge about trends in Japanese is likely to be outdated.

Aside: My secret goal is to keep being the top answerer in the tag “food.”


Jun
13
reviewed Approve transitive tag wiki excerpt
Jun
13
comment へ or に particle for 曲がる?
It is better if you explain how this question is different from the questions “When going somewhere, is there any difference between e (へ) and ni (に)?” and “How to use へ (-e), に (-ni), まで (made) and の方 (no-hō) with destination and direction?” Otherwise I propose to close it as a duplicate.
Jun
13
comment Is すごい slang or just informal?
@Dave: すごい混みようだ is correct and すごく混みようだ is incorrect. Grammatically, 混みよう is a noun meaning “crowdedness” (the degree to which something / some place is crowded), and therefore we need the form すごい which modifies a noun. The form すごく is an adverbial form, and we cannot use it here. As you said, using すごい as an adverb is very colloquial, but I did not include this colloquial usage in this answer (primarily because I focused on the usages listed in the Daijirin dictionary and this usage was not listed there).
Jun
13
comment Is すごい slang or just informal?
@Pacerier: I think so. At least nothing strikes me as strange with the phrase すごい美人.
Jun
13
answered Is すごい slang or just informal?
Jun
13
comment Is the word ハーフ derogatory?
I will not rule out the possibility that the word ハーフ can be used in a derogatory way, but your argument in the last paragraph does not prove anything. No one calls hybrid cars “ハーフカー” in Japanese, but many people us the word “ハーフ” meaning mixed-race/-ethnicity. This difference matters when we consider the implication of using these words.
Jun
13
wiki created readings description
Jun
13
comment Why does Japanese have two kinds of adjectives? (-i adjectives and -na adjectives)
Thank you for the detailed explanation. I have a question: from my Japanese-centric viewpoint, 動詞 and 形容詞 in Japanese are very different kinds of words because (1) they conjugate differently and (2) 動詞 usually describes an action whereas 形容詞 usually describes an attribute. Therefore calling 形容詞 descriptive verbs sounds strange to me. Why are they called so?
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
revised What are common mistakes made by Japanese kombini employees speaking “manual keigo” (バイト敬語)
spelling
Jun
13
comment How do I politely ask my boss for a moment of his time?
@Nicolas: Yes. That phrase is also formal and polite. Maybe that should be an answer as well.
Jun
13
comment Just how rude is 「俺{おれ}」?
I have no idea how this can be answered.
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
12
revised How do I politely ask my boss for a moment of his time?
added that お時間をいただく can also mean to make someone wait
Jun
12
answered How do I politely ask my boss for a moment of his time?
Jun
12
comment is “超” (chō) seldom used in written works?
@Mark: I removed the tag [politeness] you added because I could not see the relevance of the tag to the question. If you or anyone else thinks that it is relevant, please add it back with an explanation in a comment.
Jun
12
revised is “超” (chō) seldom used in written works?
edited tags
Jun
12
comment What is the sense of 気配がする (けはいがする) versus 気がする?
Do you really think that the meaning “quotation in the stock market” of 気配 has anything to do with this question? It is not very useful to copy dictionary definitions without considering their applicability.
Jun
12
comment What’s the difference between [v] たとしても and just the plain ても
I think 読んだとしでも must be a typo for 読んだとしても.
Jun
12
answered Meaning and level of 死ねばいいのに