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Feb
7
comment How to read: the “~” in “3~4 行”
We can potentially close the other question as a duplicate of this one, even though this is newer.
Feb
7
comment The passive form
@l'électeur That's an interesting example! It's unusual as a passive because it doesn't take a by-phrase expressing the agent (*He was born by a Greek peasant; see the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language p.1436). Anyway, most native English speakers don't know how to identify the passive voice in the first place, so they aren't particularly conscious of it.
Feb
7
comment Is おふくろ related to ふく?
All I did was correct one little mistake (you accidentally wrote "Japanese-Netherland dictionary"). virmaior did most of the editing to make your English easier to read―please see the edit history to see who did what. Anyway, edits aren't about you or your reputation (I don't care about your reputation either). They're about the users who will read your answer in the future. The site is a better place when answers contain fewer errors.
Feb
6
comment Does ただな mean the same thing as ただの?
I mean no words in the entire dictionary are listed that way; they don't acknowledge it as a part of speech, and lump them all in with nouns. (I have the full version and I'm not sure what the abridged version is like.)
Feb
6
comment Does ただな mean the same thing as ただの?
広辞苑 doesn't list anything as a 形容動詞, by the way.
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between ために and -masu root verb+ に?
Sorry, I misunderstood what the OP intended with their question mark.
Feb
5
comment What is the grammatical analysis of the sentence 「君を笑いに来た」?
We discussed this construction a bit in chat today, starting around here.
Feb
5
comment What is the difference between ために and -masu root verb+ に?
This is discussed in Martin's 1975 Reference Grammar of Japanese, pages 401-407.
Feb
5
comment ~しよう+としてします。 What is the meaning of this expression?
Are you sure about the する on the end?
Feb
5
comment Why words such as しばらく are almost always written in kana while words such as 石鹸 are usually in kanji?
@squirrel That's definitely true, although the most common examples (like 誰) were added to the list in 2010. On the flip side, there are jōyō kanji that are very rarely used, like 虞 and 璽. It's not a perfect list.
Feb
5
comment Why words such as しばらく are almost always written in kana while words such as 石鹸 are usually in kanji?
In BCCWJ, we find 418 results for 石鹸 and 492 for 石けん.
Feb
4
comment How does one keep from being confused about the pronunciation of 地下鉄?
From your question and comments it sounds like you're having a hard time properly hearing Japanese voicing contrasts. The answer is probably doing listening practice of some sort.
Feb
3
comment Difference between 変{か}わり and 変{か}える
In the context of Japanese verbal morphology, [t͡s] occurs exclusively before /u/, [t͡ɕ] exclusively before /i/, and [t] exclusively before /a/, /e/, and /o/. In short, the traditional complementary distribution holds, and treating these as separate phonemes only obscures the morphological relationships between forms.
Feb
3
comment Difference between 変{か}わり and 変{か}える
Please ask a separate question. There's a lot more to explain than I can cover in the comments section, and it's complicated by the partial phonemicization of certain sounds in recent years which are irrelevant to the discussion of Japanese verbal morphology, which makes the definition of "phonemic romanization" somewhat context-dependent. Here, for example, it would only confuse things to treat the allophones of /t/ or /s/ as separate phonemes. Doing it this way, we can talk about (for example) the verb hanat- having forms like hanat-anai, hanat-imasu, hanat-u, hanat-eru, hanat-oo, etc.
Feb
2
comment Difference between 変{か}わり and 変{か}える
I'd prefer not to. Phonemic romanization is more useful for discussing morphology than Hepburn romanization.
Feb
1
comment Difference between お腹がすいた and お腹がすいている ― 「お腹がすいた」と「お腹がすいている」の違いは?
A few examples from a paper: chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/19838055#19838055
Jan
26
comment Meaning of, Transitive verb in “te form” + iru vs Intransitive verb in “te form” + iru
It looks like things were simplified considerably for your class. Although there's definitely a correspondence between lexical aspect and transitivity, they're actually two different things, and at some point it'll probably help you to learn what the difference is, if you'd like a more accurate description of how -te iru works.
Jan
24
comment Help with translation
Can you understand better now that 人る→入る and 通逆う→通う are fixed? If not, can you tell us what specifically you're having trouble with in this quote?
Jan
24
comment 「勉強{べんきょう}を続{つづ}ける」 vs.「勉強をやり続ける」
づ and ず are both romanized as zu most of the time (because romanization is usually intended to reflect pronunciation, not kana), but in some schemes づ is du, and a few people still write dzu.
Jan
19
comment Different kanji forms for “みる”
They list 回る【みる】/廻る【みる】. I've never seen that word before―it looks like it's archaic, so you can probably ignore it here and focus on 見る etc.