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Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Jun
24
comment Random meaning of 結ぶ
精選版 日本国語大辞典 ties these meanings together. Under 一 離れているものをからみ合わせてつなげる they have 一② 手の指をからませたりして形を作る。, and in this section they have 一②イ (掬)両手のひらを一つに組み合わせる。特に、その手で水をすくうのをいう。 万葉集 1142 「命を幸くよけむと石走る垂水の水を結(むすび)て飲みつ and 一②ロ 仏教で、手指でさまざまな形をつくる。「印を結ぶ」の形で用いられる。 and 一②ハ 両手で飯をおさえて、握り飯をつくる。 Then for 二 they have the generalized meaning まとめて形にする。また、完成させたり、結束をつけたりする。, earliest cite from 源氏物語 (around 1000 AD), 明石「旅衣うらかなしさにあかしかね草の枕は夢もむすばず」
Jun
23
comment 「春じゃもの」の「じゃもの」はどういう意味?
@Kaji The copula じゃ is from ぢゃ < であ < である rather than では.
Jun
23
comment Is “田舎” a derogatory term?
The NHK漢字表記辞典 recommends kana for きれい, it seems.
Jun
23
comment “Ungrammatical” 丁寧語 used by tour guides and museum narrators
Related: japanese.stackexchange.com/a/11072/1478
Jun
21
comment Why does 背く sound like そむふ in this sentence?
By the way, words like 学生 where a vowel is regularly entirely omitted (gak'sei) are relatively common, but for whatever reason the vowel is still thought of as being there psychologically, even if it's completely gone phonetically speaking. Sometimes there is a trace in terms of coarticulation: /t/ becomes [t͡s] before /u/, even if that /u/ is completely deleted (e.g. 月 /tuki/ realized as [t͡s̥ɯki] or [t͡ski]). Some linguists do talk about "syllables" but it's possible to explain this while talking about morae only--see The Phonology of Japanese, Labrune 2012 for some discussion.
Jun
21
comment Is there a Japanese term to express the concept of “Comfort Zone”?
@naruto There's nothing weird about the English examples, as far as I can see. I think 非回答者 just wanted you to cite the source of your English sentences (apparently the Oxford Dictionary of English).
Jun
20
comment The reading of 砂利
This answer needs revision--I appear to have mixed up my sources, and the link here doesn't seem to say what this answer suggests. I read somewhere about a historical interplay between さ and しゃ, though. I should come back to this answer and fix it after doing more research…
Jun
20
comment What does 持った mean?
@chigusa Vowel stem verbs always have i or e as their final vowels, never a.
Jun
19
comment Etymology of ギリシャ: what language does “girisha” come from?
精選版 日本国語大辞典 agrees that it's via Portuguese Grécia.
Jun
18
comment How to Pronounce 化学 “Chemistry”?
@EiríkrÚtlendi You can see the relationship in the older forms of the characters, too: 売 was formerly 賣, which is 士 over 買, and 士 here is a simplified form of 出, so 売(賣) = 出+買 "put out for buying" = "sell".
Jun
18
comment What does 気が遠い mean?
Based on your comment, I edited the question to focus on 気が遠い. Hopefully that's okay :-)
Jun
18
comment When/why would one write a word using 直音表記?
There are other words, like 三味線, etc. I once researched this but what I have written down unfortunately doesn't appear to make sense. I read somewhere about a historical interplay between さ and しゃ…
Jun
17
comment How to read 連体形 + 上
Um, I don't claim to be an expert :-) But since you asked I can comment anyway. I would call it the 連体形 rather than 終止形 because it's adnominalized to a noun, but since 連体形・終止形 have merged for verbs, it doesn't seem like an important distinction to me.
Jun
16
comment Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
groups.google.com/d/msg/pmjs/RPK3wrzzO4o/2PYbpRAMIvoJ
Jun
15
comment What does 死者は何も語らない mean?
That other phrase from the Twitter post has a definition on 故事ことわざ辞典.
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
"OJ ni and nite became more specialized with ni being used more for arguments and nite more for adjuncts; from mid to late EMJ nite acquired the variant de which is still in use in contemporary NJ. Note that ni, no, nite (de), and to in addition to their uses as case and conjunctional particles remained forms of the copula, as they do in contemporary NJ." -Frellesvig, A History of the Japanese Language (2010) p.243
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
I don't think "にて didn't exist" is historically accurate. I think にて existed as far back as we have records of OJ. The forms に and にて coexisted and gradually became more specialized. (I've read reconstructions where に was originally the 連用形 of an older Proto-Japonic copula, explaining why て was able to attach to it.)
Jun
15
comment Is this は replacing が or を? (& is this 悪 read as あく or わる?)
About わる and あく: We talked a little bit about this on chat, and Choko had some comments: chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/511/conversation/and-
Jun
15
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
I usually ignore all the papers about child acquisition, but IIRC a lot of overgeneralizations in child Japanese have to do with particles, that is, overgeneralizing syntax rather than morphology. I think I've seen mention of overgeneralizing に and の.
Jun
15
comment 準備が出来ている-Meaning and Explanation
@Anthony Achievement verbs are conceptualized as taking no time at all. That's why the term "punctual" is sometimes used--they take place at a single "point" in time. And so, with ~ている, they have a resultative interpretation: 扉が閉まっている means "the door IS CLOSED", that is, it's in the state that results from being closed at some point in the past. But technically ~ている doesn't always imply ~た--it's possible a door could be closed, even if it's never been open before.