18,762 reputation
33385
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 13 mins ago

Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


May
15
comment What's the meaning of にあたって/にあたり? How can I translate it?
Have you looked it up in a dictionary? What did you find?
May
14
comment Japanese without Kanji
Ignoring extralinguistic features like writing systems, it's difficult to define language difficulty in an absolute way. It's more easily defined relative to the languages you already know--look up linguistic distance. Japanese is much easier to learn for a native speaker of Korean than English, for example.
May
14
comment Japanese without Kanji
languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=2667
May
14
comment What does 「VほうもVほうだ」 mean?
Thank you for the answer and the extra examples! :-)
May
14
comment What does 「VほうもVほうだ」 mean?
Dave M G, I'm not sure, to be honest. Most of my grammar books are on paper! @YangMuye Oh, I remember learning that now that you say so! I'm lucky to have you and naruto around to teach me :-) I had forgotten entirely.
May
13
comment What are ある and わけ in 「どこにでもあるわけではありません」?
I think that わけ here is usually written in kana. I'm not sure about your "have sense" translation. I think the literal translation of 訳{わけ} is closer to "reason" (理由) but I don't think it should be taken literally in this construction.
May
13
comment Is there a term for words that share the same kana spelling?
Those accent marks are hard to read. I like the syntax Earthling suggests better. Another alternative is indicating accent location (as e.g. Martin does): kòokoo and kookoo.
May
12
comment Why is the particle の used instead of が in these phrases?
I think we have several questions on が-の conversion (also called nominative-genitive conversion): japanese.stackexchange.com/q/12825/1478
May
11
comment わけ accompanied by な particle
Historically they're the exact same だ, although you can treat them as separate things if you like as a matter of theory.
May
11
comment When do I use できます as opposed to わかります in a sentence?
Hello, Meg! I'm going to edit out your bonus question because we like to keep it to one question per question here on the Japanese Language Stack Exchange. But please feel free to post it as a separate question as Dave M G has suggested. Thank you!
May
11
comment When do I use できます as opposed to わかります in a sentence?
@DaveMG My guess is that she's come across both にほんごが できます and にほんごが わかります or similar phrases. In this sort of situation, they can be compared to one another.
May
10
comment How can transitive and passive be combined in 茎を編んで作られる?
If we extend the discussion to predicates where 〜て is followed by a subsidiary verb (補助動詞) such as いる・ある・いく・くる・おく etc., it gets a little more complicated to describe, because usually the combination acts more like a single predicate than two separate predicates joined by て. Your sentence with 編んで and 作られています, however, has two predicates, one finite and one not. The finite verb is 作られています.
May
10
comment The use of “で” and "を” in this sentence
@Ash That explains this use of を, but it doesn't really comment on whether で is acceptable. I think this is a new question and that an answer should discuss こうえんでさんぽします。.
May
10
comment How can transitive and passive be combined in 茎を編んで作られる?
@Tim Japanese has two morphological tenses, often called past (た) and non-past (る), and a clause with either of these is considered finite. A clause ending in 〜て isn't either of these, so we can call it non-finite.
May
10
comment S1 と S2 conditional S2 being in past tense
Do you mind if I ask what this quote is from? I thought it was from ごん狐 but I don't see this sentence in there.
May
9
comment Use of と in this sentence
One way to see that the とs are different is to look at the grammar: The と in NounとNoun is a coordinator, meaning you're putting multiple things of the same type together. You can add it to as many nouns as you want: AとBとCとD And although the final と is very often omitted, it doesn't have to be: AとBとCとDと is okay, too. But with Verbと, you aren't coordinating anything. It just goes on one thing (the verb), and the thing after it can't have と. So in terms of grammar they're two different things. (By the way, I like your edit, I just thought I'd try my hand at clarifying :-)
May
8
comment ブラウザ or ブラウザー? Words borrowed from English which end with -er
Related discussion here: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/4956/…
May
8
comment Does -ou / -you / -mashou conjugation have a negative form?
@hippietrail The volitional/cohortative -(y)ō isn't really an imperative form.
May
7
comment Sentence ending in かも・・・ what is the meaning?
Related (about 〜てほしい in the first sentence, not your actual question): japanese.stackexchange.com/q/15686/1478
May
7
comment How do I say “without (noun)” using なしに or なしで?
I added the information from the comments thus far to the best of my ability. (I've left out the example sentence for 〜ないで since it doesn't quite work, but you could perhaps ask a separate question about that.)