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Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Feb
20
comment Attributive form in Japanese narration
I've seen the term adnominal more often than attributive, though both seem perfectly understandable to me. In Japanese, you might see the term 連体{れんたい}, as in 連体形{れんたいけい} (adnominal form of a word), 連体詞{れんたいし} (a non-inflecting part of speech which occurs chiefly adnominally), and 連体修飾{れんたいしゅうしょく} (adnominal modification).
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@Hyperworm I tried to gloss over this in my answer by saying "in some situations" repeatedly... :-) I realize it's not perfect. If I can think of a good way to improve the answer without getting too off-topic, I will come back and edit it.
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@Hyperworm That's true, it's not a perfect analogy. Thank you for pointing that out! I also wanted to avoid presenting the precise rules in English because they're quite complicated and I hoped the details weren't necessary here--e.g., where cannot be replaced with that or omitted (as you say) unless the head NP strongly suggests a place ("a place where/that/∅ you can relax" but "the web page where/*that/*∅ the claim was first made")--and also because I didn't want to reproduce a reference grammar of English on a site dedicated to Japanese :-)
Feb
20
comment An interesting postcard
@TokyoNagoya The community decides what to close, so if people don't vote to close a question (even if it would normally be considered off-topic), it will stay open forever :-)
Feb
20
comment A Very Painful Situation
@Chocolate "My feeling was bad" doesn't mean anything in English as far as I can tell...
Feb
19
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
The term I think you're looking for is "relative clause".
Feb
19
comment Why is カラオケ (karaoke) written in katakana?
@ssb True, though there are similar examples that are entirely made in Japan, like モテる or ズレる.
Feb
19
comment what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
@kinyo Yes. As I said before, it can be said to be in its 連体形 (adnominal form), and I think that its function is called 連体修飾 (adnominal modification).
Feb
19
comment what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
@kinyo No; in English, words in attributive position modify nouns. Both nouns ("atom bomb") and adjectives ("atomic bomb") can have attributive function. At any rate, English grammar has no bearing on what part of speech 飲む might be; it is definitely not an adjective.
Feb
19
comment How To Learn Japanese Vocabulary?
You can't get to vocabulary from RTK. It just teaches you how to remember characters. You'll have to learn the Japanese language separately.
Feb
18
comment what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
@kinyo In Japanese grammar, when you move a verb before a noun, it's still a verb, not an "adjective participle". It can be said to be in its 連体形 (adnominal form), and I think that its function is called 連体修飾 (adnominal modification).
Feb
18
comment Meaning of 員 - Heisig vs world
@Geeo By the way, I think if you look online you can find alternate keywords to use--various people in the past have disagreed with one keyword or another. (Heisig also revised some of them to be more accurate in later editions, so for example 峠 changed from "mountain peak" to "mountain pass". But 員 is still "employee".)
Feb
16
comment The etymology of 泊
@Anthony 語 is made up of 言 + 吾, so it doesn't directly include 五. (You can look up the character origin in the same 漢和辞典 you found 泊 in.)
Feb
16
comment Grammar of (verb)し(noun) such as in 選ばれし者
@TrevorAlexander For this particular 助動詞, き is the 終止形 and し is the 連体形. That's the opposite of what you get with classical adjective conjugation, where 〜し is the 終止形 and 〜き is the 連体形.
Feb
16
comment The “right” way to write Japanese lyrics
「っ」 is usually not a glottal stop. A "glottal stop" is when you stop sound entirely using the glottis (as in the English "uh-oh"). In Japanese, 「っ」 before /k g t d b p/ is a stop, but not glottal; 「っ」 before /s z h/ is not a stop at all (the sound isn't entirely stopped by any part of the vocal tract). You'd usually only pronounce 「っ」 as a glottal stop utterance initially or finally (as in 「あっ!」).
Feb
15
comment pronounciation of ひと
It appears that you're describing "devoiced vowels". See this question for some discussion.
Feb
15
comment Using negative verb forms with はず
明鏡国語辞典 says: 「賛成するはずがない/賛成しないはずだ」では、前者の方が意味が強い(前者は賛成の可能性が皆無、後者は可能性を残す)。
Feb
14
comment when 澤 has a kunyomi of うるお
My impression is that the older form 澤 is mostly used in names, while in regular words 沢 is more common.
Feb
13
comment What does 春夏冬 mean?
@TokyoNagoya As the bottom of the page says, everything on SE is licensed under Creative Commons with attribution required. That means people can base answers on information from other people, but they must give credit. Plagiarism is not okay.
Feb
12
comment What is the radical which is written by two dots on the top of a Kanji?
@Steel 町 has two elements: 田 (a pictograph of a rice field) and 丁 (a pictograph of a nail). The latter is the phonetic element, giving the character its pronunciation. What specific meaning it lends to 町 is debatable; Henshall says it "was used phonetically to express walk, and also lent its T-shape to suggest junction of paths. [町] originally meant paths through the fields, and by extension place where fields join, then area/community."