21,279 reputation
43794
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 48 mins ago

Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Aug
11
comment Why does 留守{るす} have two almost opposite meanings?
@DaveMG 日本国語大辞典 dates this meaning back to 1208. They cite 吾妻鏡承元二年(1208)七月大十九日. (There's a translation into modern Japanese if you click the link and search for 留守. You'll get three in-page results: ① the way it was originally written, ② the 訓読, and ③ the translation into 現代語.)
Aug
10
comment How to properly pronounce コップ?
@Sjiveru Wikipedia is helpful! But I'm not sure it's actually "the best"―I would rather recommend books on phonetics and phonology, for example Vance 2008 and Labrune 2012. By the way, there are more cases where pronunciation is not necessarily predictable from spelling, most notably pitch accent but also devoicing and the pronunciation of certain long vowels (and certain other minor exceptions).
Aug
10
comment Which kanji has the greatest number of strokes?
Although it may not be in the top 2500 kanji in that particular newspaper corpus, 鬱 is actually a relatively common kanji. Compare this frequency list‌​. I think it's reasonable to expect that everyone can read 鬱, and some people (but not all) can write it.
Aug
10
comment Why many words (nouns?) end with つ?
The other part of this story is the epenthetic /i/ and /u/ in Japanese.
Aug
10
comment Why many words (nouns?) end with つ?
If you have any corrections to make to your own answer, please use the edit button rather than leaving a comment.
Aug
9
comment Verb for the object `dareka` in `探さずにはいられない 誰かを`
Also, ずっと often appears in comparative constructions. See よりもずっと on ALC
Aug
9
comment Verb for the object `dareka` in `探さずにはいられない 誰かを`
We would still prefer if you asked one question per question when possible. This is better than when you asked 7 questions in one about the same song, but it's still not quite ideal.
Aug
6
comment 「健全なる精神は健全なる身体に宿る」のなる
@Anthony I don't think you upset anyone, don't worry :-)
Aug
6
comment Non-Japanese can know their “マナー”, but not their “礼儀{れいぎ}”?
While there are plenty of Japanese words I, as a learner, don't know the meaning of, "something only a Japanese person can understand the definition of" seems kind of ridiculous.
Aug
5
comment 「健全なる精神は健全なる身体に宿る」のなる
@Choko Or how about 聖なる, but not *聖な?
Aug
5
comment difference between “田中さんのこと” and just “田中さん”?
@user312440 We try not to delete duplicates. We like duplicates! The idea is that a new user coming in from Google might phrase the question the way you did, rather than the way the original asker did, so your duplicate helps them find the answers they want :-)
Aug
4
comment 「健全なる精神は健全なる身体に宿る」のなる
Yes, please be careful not to mix up 成る "become" with なる < にある, the adnominal form of the classical copula なり < にあり, which is the source of modern な. Compare the modern copula だ < であ < である < にてあり, which is etymologically the same as なり < にあり except with にて in place of に.
Aug
4
comment Meaning of 「生きるにしても死ぬにしても」
@Ataraxia Making reference nonspecific when there's no literal reason to do so is often taken as disparaging or belittling—you can do it with なんて, なんか, など, たり, だの, とか, etc., though the association is especially strong with なんて. If you want to read about the topic in detail, Satoko Suzuki describes it in Pejorative Connotation: A Case of Japanese (1996).
Aug
4
comment Meaning of 「生きるにしても死ぬにしても」
Searching online I find it written this way: 「人間なんて、生きるにしても、死ぬにしても、せいぜいたった100ねん。」
Aug
4
comment Adnominalisation (Relative clause - noun - copula structure): What does it mean? How can we translate it?
I added a new tag, information-structure, for discussions of different ways to structure the same information; also called information packaging because the information is the same as in a basic sentence, but it's packaged differently: "I ate the cake" versus "It was I who ate the cake", or "A man was walking down the street" versus "There was a man walking down the street", etc. Maybe we could find some older related questions and tag them, too.
Aug
3
comment Is /z/ pronounced as [z] or [dz] or both?
@EiríkrÚtlendi Yes, there are a few dialects that retain the distinction, around Shikoku and Kyushu according to Wikipedia. Thank you for pointing that out. But this answer is about standard Japanese. (I would be careful with the phrase "in the south and west", since that might be taken as describing a much larger region than actually makes the distinction. They're merged for most speakers.)
Aug
2
comment Looking for references on 複合格助詞
I'm afraid it's too much for me to type up here, but you can probably find a copy at your library.
Aug
2
comment Can the である copula be explained as で (particle) + ある (to exist), i.e. “to exist in the form of ~”?
@3to5businessdays 補助動詞 are grammaticalized uses of certain verbs (Martin 1975 p.512 lists いる/おる/いらっしゃる, くる/まいる, いく, くれる/くださる, しまう, みる, おく, もらう/いただく, ある/ございます, やる/あげる, and みせる) following て in which the verbs no longer have their usual meaning and aren't considered to form independent predicates. Most of them are not dummies because they contribute semantically, e.g. ~ている with its progressive/resultative/habitual/experiential meanings that ~て alone does not have. In contrast, で can form non-finite predicates without ある, so we can conclude that ある doesn't contribute semantically to である.
Jul
31
comment The の in のに and なのに
@Sjiveru That's how Martin analyzes it in his 1975 Reference Grammar of Japanese (p.858): "In the third meaning of the の-nominalization—'fact (etc.)'―に occurs as the essive (or copula infinitive) with a special implication: 'despite the fact that'".
Jul
31
comment Etymology of 出来る dekiru
You might use the phonemic spelling idu rather than idzu. In any case, I don't think づ had become assibilated yet.