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Feb
26
comment Usage of Verb て Verb て
@usukidoll Japanese is usually written in a kana-kanji mixture. The kanji help you visually break the text up into words. Of course, you can write Japanese without kanji! You'll find children's books written that way, for example. But those children's books often use spaces to make it easier to read, so I thought spaces might be helpful here, too.
Feb
25
comment Usage of Verb て Verb て
I added commas and spaces to help with reading this text, since it's written entirely in kana. (I'm not sure how げつ、すい、きん should be written in kana―are those commas normal?)
Feb
24
comment ある or 持つ, what's the difference?
The "own" idea seems off to me. There are plenty of times you would translate 持っている to "have" but not "own", for example 能力を持っている "have an ability", 経験を持っている "have experience", or 興味を持っている "have an interest". There must be some other difference between 興味がある and 興味を持っている than the "have-own" distinction.
Feb
17
comment How did 真っ赤 came to mean “downright”?
This reduplication theory is really interesting! Is there somewhere I can read more? I'm curious how /massao/ fits in.
Feb
17
comment Are there differences in nuance when choosing to use 音読み over 訓読み?
Your examples are all pairs of two different words written the same way. In each case, you'll have to consider the words and how they differ in meaning, tone, register, etc. There is no general answer covering every pair of words written the same way.
Feb
16
comment Is さようなら still used in real life?
Just a small quibble: I don't think サヨナラゲーム is re-imported from English. Remember that things can be written in katakana even if they aren't loanwords.
Feb
16
comment (Person's name) + 君の事
I think this use of こと is usually written in kana.
Feb
9
comment How to say a sentence without repeating the word?
I have a book somewhere that talks about English speakers needing to learn not to be afraid of repeating themselves in Japanese. I wonder if I can find it…
Feb
7
comment 「周囲を取り囲む(ように)」, set phrase?
There's also 周囲を取り巻く.
Feb
7
comment The passive form
It also seems interesting in Japanese, since うまれる is derived from the passive form of うむ. Martin discusses these intransitive verbs derived from passives in his Reference Grammar of Japanese, starting on page 307.
Feb
7
comment How to read: the “~” in “3~4 行”
We can potentially close the other question as a duplicate of this one, even though this is newer.
Feb
7
comment The passive form
@l'électeur That's an interesting example! It's unusual as a passive because it doesn't take a by-phrase expressing the agent (*He was born by a Greek peasant; see the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language p.1436). Anyway, most native English speakers don't know how to identify the passive voice in the first place, so they aren't particularly conscious of it.
Feb
7
comment Is おふくろ related to ふく?
All I did was correct one little mistake (you accidentally wrote "Japanese-Netherland dictionary"). virmaior did most of the editing to make your English easier to read―please see the edit history to see who did what. Anyway, edits aren't about you or your reputation (I don't care about your reputation either). They're about the users who will read your answer in the future. The site is a better place when answers contain fewer errors.
Feb
6
comment Does ただな mean the same thing as ただの?
I mean no words in the entire dictionary are listed that way; they don't acknowledge it as a part of speech, and lump them all in with nouns. (I have the full version and I'm not sure what the abridged version is like.)
Feb
6
comment Does ただな mean the same thing as ただの?
広辞苑 doesn't list anything as a 形容動詞, by the way.
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between ために and -masu root verb+ に?
Sorry, I misunderstood what the OP intended with their question mark.
Feb
5
comment What is the grammatical analysis of the sentence 「君を笑いに来た」?
We discussed this construction a bit in chat today, starting around here.
Feb
5
comment What is the difference between ために and -masu root verb+ に?
This is discussed in Martin's 1975 Reference Grammar of Japanese, pages 401-407.
Feb
5
comment ~しよう+としてします。 What is the meaning of this expression?
Are you sure about the する on the end?
Feb
5
comment Why words such as しばらく are almost always written in kana while words such as 石鹸 are usually in kanji?
@squirrel That's definitely true, although the most common examples (like 誰) were added to the list in 2010. On the flip side, there are jōyō kanji that are very rarely used, like 虞 and 璽. It's not a perfect list.