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Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Jun
15
comment What does 死者は何も語らない mean?
That other phrase from the Twitter post has a definition on 故事ことわざ辞典.
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
"OJ ni and nite became more specialized with ni being used more for arguments and nite more for adjuncts; from mid to late EMJ nite acquired the variant de which is still in use in contemporary NJ. Note that ni, no, nite (de), and to in addition to their uses as case and conjunctional particles remained forms of the copula, as they do in contemporary NJ." -Frellesvig, A History of the Japanese Language (2010) p.243
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
I don't think "にて didn't exist" is historically accurate. I think にて existed as far back as we have records of OJ. The forms に and にて coexisted and gradually became more specialized. (I've read reconstructions where に was originally the 連用形 of an older Proto-Japonic copula, explaining why て was able to attach to it.)
Jun
15
comment Is this は replacing が or を? (& is this 悪 read as あく or わる?)
About わる and あく: We talked a little bit about this on chat, and Choko had some comments: chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/511/conversation/and-
Jun
15
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
I usually ignore all the papers about child acquisition, but IIRC a lot of overgeneralizations in child Japanese have to do with particles, that is, overgeneralizing syntax rather than morphology. I think I've seen mention of overgeneralizing に and の.
Jun
15
comment 準備が出来ている-Meaning and Explanation
@Anthony Achievement verbs are conceptualized as taking no time at all. That's why the term "punctual" is sometimes used--they take place at a single "point" in time. And so, with ~ている, they have a resultative interpretation: 扉が閉まっている means "the door IS CLOSED", that is, it's in the state that results from being closed at some point in the past. But technically ~ている doesn't always imply ~た--it's possible a door could be closed, even if it's never been open before.
Jun
15
comment 準備が出来ている-Meaning and Explanation
@Anthony That's because potential forms ("can do") are stative, and stative verbs can't appear in ~ている. But you can say (for example) 分かっている. It just forces the listener to reinterpret it as non-stative, so here it would no longer have potential meaning and would instead mean "is currently in the state that results from 分かった". They're reinterpreted as achievement verbs.
Jun
14
comment What's with all the possible kanji for とる?
From most to least frequent on BCCWJ: 取る (85.95%), 撮る (7.02%), 採る (2.06%), 捕る (1.51%), 奪る (0.94%), 摂る (0.86%), 執る (0.62%), 獲る (0.56%), 盗る (0.28%), 録る (0.14%), 穫る (0.06%).
Jun
14
comment Surprising noun order involving the の particle
By the way, do you have any context for this sentence?
Jun
13
comment Is the Japanese verb 'ちらばります’ an intransitive verb or not?
Here are some tips: 1. Look up the citation form of the verb, which is ちらばる, not the polite form. 2. If you check a Japanese dictionary, look for the 自 (intransitive) or 他 (transitive) labels. 3. If you check jisho.org, it'll say "transitive verb" or "intransitive verb".
Jun
13
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
I would say "exists" is an overtranslation, though. Although ある still has that meaning, when it's part of the copular で+ある construction I think it's been grammaticalized, and part of that process is semantic bleaching--loss of the verb's original meaning. (ある plays a lot of grammatical roles in Japanese.) Anyway, I'd like to write an answer for this, but I need time to put my thoughts together and re-check my sources :-)
Jun
13
comment Repeating the vowel sound of the mora that precedes gemination in songs
Gemination in Japanese generally doesn't involve a glottal stop, so I think it's weird to indicate it with /ʔ̩/ or to refer to it as a "glottal stop". But some Japanese phonologists do consider it a phoneme, which they label /Q/. For example, the prefix ぶっ (as in ぶっ飛ばす) could be written buQ-.
Jun
13
comment Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
Frellesvig suggests a simpler analysis: there was only one class of adjectives, but some (newer) adjectives had し built-in as part of the word, and for these words there was no need to add し for the 終止形. See A History of the Japanese Language (Frellesvig 2010), p.90.
Jun
12
comment On 原稿用紙, when are ゛ and ゜ (ten-ten and maru) supposed to occupy a square of their own?
Yeah, I assume they mean versus か゛は゜.
Jun
11
comment Nouns exhibiting vowel fronting
Frellesvig talks about this on pp.44-47 of A History of the Japanese Language (2010). Searching online, I found a very similar discussion by Frellesvig that was freely available: conf.ling.cornell.edu/whitman/… Search for apophonic.
Jun
11
comment Origin of -aru verbs: いらっしゃる、おっしゃる、くださる、なさる
@dainichi Thanks, that's a good counterexample! It seems that I accidentally made my assertion too strong. But there's a real historical phenomenon to be discussed, if I can manage to get it right. Frellesvig (2010) writes of OJ: "The mediae and the liquid (/r/) did not occur word initially. There were, however, suffixes with initial media or liquid, [...] For the mediae, this does not seem to reflect an original phonotactic restriction, but rather the secondary origin of the mediae." (p.43) And with many verbs we can see how they developed later on (e.g. いづ became でる). I'll update :-)
Jun
11
comment Do you need です before から at the end of sentence?
Following an -i adjective, I think that in standard Japanese です has been reanalyzed as a politeness marker rather than a copula. It doesn't bear tense, the adjective does: 高かったです but not *高いでした; it's not in alternation with the plain form copula: 高いです or 高かったです but not *高いだ or *高かっただ; and 高い forms a complete predicate on its own. So in this case I would not call it a copula or a form of だ.
Jun
11
comment Word difference question - reply (返事 vs 返信)
Hello! Welcome to Japanese.SE! We prefer if you ask one question per question on this site. Please feel free to ask your other question separately. Thank you!
Jun
11
comment 病院に行きます or 病院へ行きます?
Since we already have a question that's substantially the same, I've linked this one as a duplicate. If anyone would like to add anything, please do it on an answer over there so we can keep all our answers in one place :-) Thank you!
Jun
10
comment ‥ができないと vs ‥はできないと
@YangMuye Some speakers don't feel じゃない has the force of は anymore and liken it to でない instead of ではない.