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Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Jul
8
comment ~に~があります vs ~は~です in this sentence
Related: japanese.stackexchange.com/q/13249/1478
Jul
7
comment Particle の in this sentence
See Word formation in a modular theory of grammar: postsyntactic compounds in Japanese (Shibatani & Kageyama 1988). It describes not only using verbal nouns with の, but also dropping case markers on their arguments and the intonation on the resulting phrase. (I wouldn't have found this paper without your answer, so thank you! :-)
Jul
7
comment How are the different pronunciations of kanji used, such as onyomi and kunyomi?
One more note: 隼人 and 狩人 (and 弟 and 妹 and 商人 and 素人 and 玄人 and 若人 and 仲人 etc.) contain ひと etymologically, not just と.
Jul
7
comment What is the etymology behind る in 日{ひ}/昼{ひる} and 夜{よ}/夜{よる}?
Unger writes: "Perhaps the -ru of both piru and yoru should be compared to the -ru in the adjective root akaru- 'bright' (cf. aka 'red', *aka 'brighten; open' [reconstructed in Martin 1987]), which seems to have added an intensive or transient sense. (Recall that piru could specifically denote 'noon'.) Alternatively, piru and yoru might have been reductions of longer expressions ..."
Jul
7
comment What is the etymology behind る in 日{ひ}/昼{ひる} and 夜{よ}/夜{よる}?
I'm not sure if anyone knows the answer, but る must be some kind of bound morpheme rather than an independent word compounded with よ/ひ, because at the time these words had formed, Japanese words never began with /r/. It does seem that よ compounded (e.g. 夜中) but よる did not.
Jul
5
comment The meaning of v-ta+であろう
Is いかに without a following も or か older-style Japanese? (Here meaning なんと?)
Jul
5
comment The meaning of v-ta+であろう
Thank you for adding some context! If you can make sure to supply context with future questions as well, it'll help people to write specific, helpful answers.
Jul
4
comment Difference between 区別 and 差別
Did you look them up in a dictionary?
Jul
4
comment Transliterating the last name Cobaxin
@Earthliŋ I know people insert /i/ instead of /u/ sometimes, but I went with /u/ because it's more common.
Jul
3
comment How is 自然と being used in this sentence?
Something like: "That alone would be enough for the town to prosper, but what's more, since there's no bridge across the Slaude, people naturally end up passing through this town, which has many ferries."
Jul
2
comment 「日焼{ひや}け」 is not representative of a means to nominalize verbs?
There are lots of examples: 人を殺す → 人殺し, for instance.
Jul
2
comment How should we understand the plain form when used in novels set in the past?
We have a question about "free indirect speech": japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/16083/…
Jun
24
comment What are appropriate situations where you use 何卒 to end a formal correspondence?
For what it's worth, the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ) has 4147 results for どうぞ, 72 results for 何卒, and 0 results for 何卒どうぞ.
Jun
24
comment Words that have been borrowed twice, with different pronunciations?
@DaveMG 日本国語大辞典 has a cite for ハンバーグ in Japanese from 1898, so it must have entered the language then at the latest. The dictionary says it comes from English.
Jun
24
comment Random meaning of 結ぶ
精選版 日本国語大辞典 ties these meanings together. Under 一 離れているものをからみ合わせてつなげる they have 一② 手の指をからませたりして形を作る。, and in this section they have 一②イ (掬)両手のひらを一つに組み合わせる。特に、その手で水をすくうのをいう。 万葉集 1142 「命を幸くよけむと石走る垂水の水を結(むすび)て飲みつ and 一②ロ 仏教で、手指でさまざまな形をつくる。「印を結ぶ」の形で用いられる。 and 一②ハ 両手で飯をおさえて、握り飯をつくる。 Then for 二 they have the generalized meaning まとめて形にする。また、完成させたり、結束をつけたりする。, earliest cite from 源氏物語 (around 1000 AD), 明石「旅衣うらかなしさにあかしかね草の枕は夢もむすばず」
Jun
23
comment 「春じゃもの」の「じゃもの」はどういう意味?
@Kaji The copula じゃ is from ぢゃ < であ < である rather than では.
Jun
23
comment Is “田舎” a derogatory term?
The NHK漢字表記辞典 recommends kana for きれい, it seems.
Jun
23
comment “Ungrammatical” 丁寧語 used by tour guides and museum narrators
Related: japanese.stackexchange.com/a/11072/1478
Jun
21
comment Why does 背く sound like そむふ in this sentence?
By the way, words like 学生 where a vowel is regularly entirely omitted (gak'sei) are relatively common, but for whatever reason the vowel is still thought of as being there psychologically, even if it's completely gone phonetically speaking. Sometimes there is a trace in terms of coarticulation: /t/ becomes [t͡s] before /u/, even if that /u/ is completely deleted (e.g. 月 /tuki/ realized as [t͡s̥ɯki] or [t͡ski]). Some linguists do talk about "syllables" but it's possible to explain this while talking about morae only--see The Phonology of Japanese, Labrune 2012 for some discussion.
Jun
21
comment Is there a Japanese term to express the concept of “Comfort Zone”?
@naruto There's nothing weird about the English examples, as far as I can see. I think 非回答者 just wanted you to cite the source of your English sentences (apparently the Oxford Dictionary of English).