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Dec
17
comment Why is やりたい放題 used as opposed to やり放題?
From the Google Japanese Web N-gram corpus: やりたい放題 306350, やり放題 53050
Dec
17
comment Why is やりたい放題 used as opposed to やり放題?
Unfortunately, you don't know how many hits there are. Google only provides estimates, and they've never really tried to make the estimates particularly accurate. We can't conclude from the result estimates alone that either expression is common or rare. (I think this is a good question, though.)
Dec
14
comment Can someone help break down this sentence?
It looks like you should be asking specifically about the 〜〜に踏み切る part.
Dec
14
comment How to say “I don't know you well”
Straight translation questions are off-topic here, but I feel like there's more to this question than just that. You're asking about politeness as well. If you can edit your question to include a translation attempt, then people would be able to comment on whether the phrase you've come up with is rude or not, or possibly suggest alternatives.
Dec
13
comment How to find alternative writings of a kanji in electronic form?
And just to confirm, the Chinese version is also 13 strokes: bihua.51240.com/e7bdae__bihuachaxun
Dec
13
comment Verb negative-form + なる
Related: japanese.stackexchange.com/q/16328/1478
Dec
12
comment what does this symbol mean? ⊂((・x・))⊃
@Sanandrea On this site, the community decides what sorts of questions are on-topic by voting. It takes 5 votes to close a question, but so far only 2 close votes have been cast, while 3 people have voted to leave it open. And in the meta discussion about whether these sorts of questions are on-topic, several users supported an answer saying they should be allowed. So although there's some disagreement, at the moment it looks like your question is considered on-topic and will remain open :-)
Dec
12
comment what does this symbol mean? ⊂((・x・))⊃
@AndrewGrimm HiruneDiver's answer below explains the difference between emoji (like 🚃) and kaomoji (like :)).
Dec
12
comment Meaning of 真であるとして
It's actually a noun phrase rather than a sentence.
Dec
9
comment What word that resembles “teikkai” might refer to “the provenance of a food”?
Contacting the author is probably the best idea. I'm not sure whether or not this question can be answered without doing so.
Dec
8
comment Meaning of じゃろ and じゃろう
@user3856370 Even though it's about the same quote, you can ask that as a separate question.
Dec
8
comment How does one make potential passive in Japanese?
@user11589 I think external links are okay and can be helpful, but I don't think that particular link contains any useful information.
Dec
8
comment How does one make potential passive in Japanese?
Can you give an example of what you want to say?
Dec
7
comment せず - What does it come from?
The second link probably needs another answer…
Dec
7
comment What does it mean when someone says -han after a person's name?
It would make sense if /s/ was less likely to weaken to /h/ before the high vowels /i/ and /u/ because those are the vowels where the tongue is closest to the roof of the mouth, and the Kansai /s/→/h/ weakening is (historically) caused by a loss of contact between the tip of the tongue and the roof of the mouth. If they're already very close, the loss of contact might not happen. (This is just speculation, though.)
Dec
7
comment The component 曷 and the kanjis 褐, 喝, 謁, 渇
You can use images to show the difference, if you like :-)
Dec
6
comment Na-adjectives before は
I think some linguists would suggest distinguishing pronomial の from nominalizing の. See A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar (Makino & Tsutsui) p.315.
Dec
5
comment Understanding 「海外ではプロゲーマも人気職業の一つなの。」
One question per question, please. The site simply isn't designed to work with 7 questions in 1. I've edited this post to contain one question (and edited the answer to go with it) and reopened the question. If you'd like to post your other questions separately, feel free; you may want to try to ask something more specific, though.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to make a V-causative-te construction?
Please write answers in the answer box :-)
Dec
3
comment How to call the phenomenon where a rectangle Ϳ is shown because font misses glyph?
The Unicode website has a page with English and Japanese terms side-by-side, and that page says replacement glyph is 代替グリフ.