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Aug
13
comment Why としては instead of として
Maybe you should try to understand it as として plus は rather than looking for an English translation for the combination.
Aug
13
comment What are the differences between nouns created by renyoukei and the formal noun 「の」?
@Shuenhoy A noun can be derived from the 連用形 of a verb but the 連用形 itself is still a verb form.
Aug
12
comment How to read 向う?
And むこう is pronounced ムコー.
Aug
12
comment is “kanji” an uncountable noun in English?
A word is countable if it readily combines with the cardinal numeral determiners one, two, three, and so on. That is to say, Earthliŋ has it right :-)
Aug
12
comment How do I know if kanjis side by side like the one in this sentence is a name 美鶴木夜石は怖がらない?
@broccoliforest Ack, I thought I fixed that before I hit 'submit' ;-)
Aug
11
comment How is the word まさか used?
@virmaior I can only find 正, even in the oldest citations in 日本国語大辞典 and the 古語辞典s I have.
Aug
11
comment てはin this sentence
は is not a subject marker.
Aug
10
comment How Is つ/ツ origin 川?
@istrasci At the time hiragana and katakana developed, Japanese tu had not yet assibilated to tsu. That occurred hundreds of years later.
Aug
10
comment Why can an intransitive verb have a passive meaning in Japanese?
@naruto It does seem hard to explain 生まれる as a passive version of 生む! Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (p.307) gives the same reasoning found in your comment. By the way, English be born doesn't act like most passive forms, either. It doesn't accept a by-phrase with an agent: I was born in 1981 is OK but *I was born in 1981 by my mother is not. A to-phrase indicating the parents is okay: On November 24, 1935, a child was born to John and Jane Smith. Somehow this reminds me of the situation in Japanese . . .
Aug
9
comment Is anything implied, but not written, in this nominalization “遠くを見つめる”?
Why don't we leave it open and wait for someone to describe 遠くを? :-)
Aug
9
comment Meaning of やる stem in this sentence
Some books for learners call the 連用形 form of a verb "the stem", although I'm not quite sure why.
Aug
9
comment Why can an intransitive verb have a passive meaning in Japanese?
You might also ask why intransitive verbs can have passive-like semantics in English: "She doesn't frighten easily."
Aug
8
comment Business Japanese: what's the proper way to say “please visit [this URL]”?
Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
Aug
8
comment Must a relative clause with な adjective be ended with な rather than だ?
+1, but I want to point out that this answer assumes that na-adjectives are a type of noun. That's fine, but it's not something everyone believes, so I want to point it out explicitly in case anyone is confused.
Aug
3
comment why translate to「周囲の林が暗くなっている」?
@Chronopolis Maybe you could post a spin-off question about 暗くなっている. By the way, there are four basic meanings to 〜ている, not just two: progressive (進行中), resultative (結果残存), habitual (習慣), and experiential (経験).
Aug
2
comment “Unfindable” character in song
If you're going to work from song lyrics online, you should probably listen to the song and hear what is actually sung. Lyrics online are wrong sometimes, and they don't always include furigana (it's very common in lyrics to give arbitrary readings for kanji compounds in furigana). Most places I can find the lyrics spell it 心馴染めない, by the way, so I wonder if it's not just a mistake on the webpage you found.
Jul
31
comment Use of the particle を/に indicating target of an action - animate vs inanimate?
@Greg You just need Japanese support on your computer. How to do that depends on your OS―you can look up how to do that, and if you have problems, you can ask on SuperUser. The browser will support it fine once you've got your OS set up properly :-) In the meantime, I edited the question to contain kana (and kanji with furigana), but if you'd like to edit it, please feel free!
Jul
30
comment Is へ and に interchangeable in these cases?
Here's our chat log about へ and に. I wrote a bit, but you might want to pay special attention to Schoko's messages, as she's a native speaker and I'm a learner. (I also tried my best to write an answer.)
Jul
30
comment What is the difference between 判{わか}る and 分{わ}かる?
Being written with two different kanji doesn't necessarily mean they're two different words.
Jul
29
comment Kanji or kana in お待ちください
I think the general principle is that kanji are used to convey the meaning of the word being written. But when words like ください are used as 補助動詞, they've been grammaticalized and are "semantically bleached"―that is to say, they no longer have their lexical meaning. Since they don't have the meaning the kanji indicates, the rule to write them in kana makes sense.