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Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Jun
18
revised What does 気が遠い mean?
added 198 characters in body
Jun
18
revised What does 持った mean?
Formatting
Jun
18
answered What does 持った mean?
Jun
18
answered How to Pronounce 化学 “Chemistry”?
Jun
18
comment When/why would one write a word using 直音表記?
There are other words, like 三味線, etc. I once researched this but what I have written down unfortunately doesn't appear to make sense. I read somewhere about a historical interplay between さ and しゃ…
Jun
18
revised Reading (and usage) of 他: when is it 【た】, when is it 【ほか】?
furigana
Jun
17
revised Meaning of 指摘しない程度に
added 9 characters in body
Jun
17
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
17
revised よ after nouns in songs
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Jun
17
comment How to read 連体形 + 上
Um, I don't claim to be an expert :-) But since you asked I can comment anyway. I would call it the 連体形 rather than 終止形 because it's adnominalized to a noun, but since 連体形・終止形 have merged for verbs, it doesn't seem like an important distinction to me.
Jun
16
comment Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
groups.google.com/d/msg/pmjs/RPK3wrzzO4o/2PYbpRAMIvoJ
Jun
15
revised Pronunciation: W杯?
added 89 characters in body
Jun
15
comment What does 死者は何も語らない mean?
That other phrase from the Twitter post has a definition on 故事ことわざ辞典.
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
"OJ ni and nite became more specialized with ni being used more for arguments and nite more for adjuncts; from mid to late EMJ nite acquired the variant de which is still in use in contemporary NJ. Note that ni, no, nite (de), and to in addition to their uses as case and conjunctional particles remained forms of the copula, as they do in contemporary NJ." -Frellesvig, A History of the Japanese Language (2010) p.243
Jun
15
comment A Deeper Look Unto て, で and は
I don't think "にて didn't exist" is historically accurate. I think にて existed as far back as we have records of OJ. The forms に and にて coexisted and gradually became more specialized. (I've read reconstructions where に was originally the 連用形 of an older Proto-Japonic copula, explaining why て was able to attach to it.)
Jun
15
comment Is this は replacing が or を? (& is this 悪 read as あく or わる?)
About わる and あく: We talked a little bit about this on chat, and Choko had some comments: chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/511/conversation/and-
Jun
15
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
I usually ignore all the papers about child acquisition, but IIRC a lot of overgeneralizations in child Japanese have to do with particles, that is, overgeneralizing syntax rather than morphology. I think I've seen mention of overgeneralizing に and の.
Jun
15
comment 準備が出来ている-Meaning and Explanation
@Anthony Achievement verbs are conceptualized as taking no time at all. That's why the term "punctual" is sometimes used--they take place at a single "point" in time. And so, with ~ている, they have a resultative interpretation: 扉が閉まっている means "the door IS CLOSED", that is, it's in the state that results from being closed at some point in the past. But technically ~ている doesn't always imply ~た--it's possible a door could be closed, even if it's never been open before.
Jun
15
comment 準備が出来ている-Meaning and Explanation
@Anthony That's because potential forms ("can do") are stative, and stative verbs can't appear in ~ている. But you can say (for example) 分かっている. It just forces the listener to reinterpret it as non-stative, so here it would no longer have potential meaning and would instead mean "is currently in the state that results from 分かった". They're reinterpreted as achievement verbs.