13,713 reputation
32170
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen 6 hours ago

Hello! I'm learning Japanese!


Feb
21
comment What's the difference between 何【なん】 and 幾【いく】 when referring to amounts?
@yu_ominae If so, then you could say it is "no longer productive". In other words, it no longer combines to "produce" new words and phrases, but the old combinations are still around. (I don't know whether this is the case or not, I just wanted to introduce the term :-)
Feb
21
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@execjosh Updated phrasing :-)
Feb
21
revised Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
added 26 characters in body
Feb
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@rewolf It's true that English often has more information than Japanese does as to where the gap is. I really just want to point out that there are times when English gives no information about the gap, as in "a place [ Ø you can relax ____ ]". Here, you could optionally have where, which does indicate the role of the head noun (in this case indicating that a locative adjunct is gapped), but you can understand it just as easily without that pronoun. It's not entirely analogous to で, of course; it's different syntactically. But in any case, I'm glad the answer was helpful :-)
Feb
20
answered Let's not do this
Feb
20
comment Attributive form in Japanese narration
I've seen the term adnominal more often than attributive, though both seem perfectly understandable to me. In Japanese, you might see the term 連体{れんたい}, as in 連体形{れんたいけい} (adnominal form of a word), 連体詞{れんたいし} (a non-inflecting part of speech which occurs chiefly adnominally), and 連体修飾{れんたいしゅうしょく} (adnominal modification).
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@Hyperworm I tried to gloss over this in my answer by saying "in some situations" repeatedly... :-) I realize it's not perfect. If I can think of a good way to improve the answer without getting too off-topic, I will come back and edit it.
Feb
20
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
@Hyperworm That's true, it's not a perfect analogy. Thank you for pointing that out! I also wanted to avoid presenting the precise rules in English because they're quite complicated and I hoped the details weren't necessary here--e.g., where cannot be replaced with that or omitted (as you say) unless the head NP strongly suggests a place ("a place where/that/∅ you can relax" but "the web page where/*that/*∅ the claim was first made")--and also because I didn't want to reproduce a reference grammar of English on a site dedicated to Japanese :-)
Feb
20
revised Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
added 98 characters in body
Feb
20
comment An interesting postcard
@TokyoNagoya The community decides what to close, so if people don't vote to close a question (even if it would normally be considered off-topic), it will stay open forever :-)
Feb
20
revised Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
edited title
Feb
20
answered Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
Feb
20
comment A Very Painful Situation
@Chocolate "My feeling was bad" doesn't mean anything in English as far as I can tell...
Feb
19
comment Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that
The term I think you're looking for is "relative clause".
Feb
19
comment Why is カラオケ (karaoke) written in katakana?
@ssb True, though there are similar examples that are entirely made in Japan, like モテる or ズレる.
Feb
19
comment what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
@kinyo Yes. As I said before, it can be said to be in its 連体形 (adnominal form), and I think that its function is called 連体修飾 (adnominal modification).
Feb
19
comment what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
@kinyo No; in English, words in attributive position modify nouns. Both nouns ("atom bomb") and adjectives ("atomic bomb") can have attributive function. At any rate, English grammar has no bearing on what part of speech 飲む might be; it is definitely not an adjective.
Feb
19
comment How To Learn Japanese Vocabulary?
You can't get to vocabulary from RTK. It just teaches you how to remember characters. You'll have to learn the Japanese language separately.
Feb
18
revised what exactly is “体言止{たいげんど}め”?
added 43 characters in body