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"Ack! Bar?" -Allahu

吾輩は猫である。名前はまだ無い。


May
6
comment Why censor this one kanji?
Seems like just a typo.
Feb
28
comment How to say “open Pandora's box” in Japanese?
good answer, but that's totally not what was asked lolz. it's an idiom, no one cares what the literal meaning is. it's the idiomatic meaning which needs translation, something along the lines, I guess, of "initiating something which we will imminently regret".
Feb
22
comment How does pitch accent work in Japanese?
To be clear, I only mean that teaching or learning pitch-accent is not worthwhile. That's not saying that it's useless, it's saying that there are higher priorities, like vocabulary and idioms. Comparing the input of work for vocab, grammar, pitch-accent, etc., learning pitch-accent probably has the smallest pay-off. After all, you can still communicate well with a foreign accent, but not so well with an impoverished vocabulary.
Feb
22
comment How does pitch accent work in Japanese?
cool vids. although I'd say to ppl not to bother learning pitch accent. if you don't automatically acquire it, then learning it will offer very little net gain compared to how much effort you have to put into it.
Dec
29
comment “Mari” or “wari” ? Is this a consonant sound that changes with inflection?
@EricDong I agree but the problem is: what is "it"? how do you know, from what little is given, that "it" is わかります? if there is a verb まかります then you have to consider that. I think you're right that the phones [m] and [ɰ] may sound similar phonetically (maybe similar formants or by some other spectral decomposition) but they are dissimilar phonologically, so it seems unlikely that there was a speech error (but i don't know a lot about speech errors). personally, I think its わかります and the playback or recording quality is bad and this poster hasn't become sensitive to the difference yet.
Dec
27
comment Can the term メリークリスマス be seen as politically incorrect?
Agreed. If it's a katakana word, you can be pretty sure that Japanese people have only a tenuous conception of the phrase's political overhead as it is in the States. It's entrenched Gairaigo, I don't live in Japan, but I'm guessing its usage, even in the media, is almost entirely devoid of sincere religious pretext. Although I don't think religious demography in Japan explains why it may or may not be politically correct.
Dec
9
comment Rules for emphasizing by lengthening sounds
@TsuyoshiIto Going with my textbooks it can't be a lengthening of [ŋ]. It just seems that way. [ŋ] is an allophone first of all, which means it's a fully specified segment. It doesn't make sense to lengthen an allophone, but I don't think I know enough phonology to explain exactly why other than that's just not the defined role of allophones. I'll try to do a Q on this すんごい specifically and try to work out the details if I can.
Dec
7
comment Rules for emphasizing by lengthening sounds
There are rules, but they aren't all characterized strictly as lengthening. For example すごい->すんごい isn't a lengthening of any phone. If the medial /g/ is lengthened retrogressively than it results in gemination /Q/ not an epenthetical mora nasal /N/ which is the case here. The only dominant commonality in your examples is that the words are prosodically longer. So I'm guessing that's what you meant by lengthening; prosodic lengthening via epenthesis to the the moraic skeleton?
Nov
27
comment i-adjectives used as na-adjectives: is there a difference? (e.g. 大きい versus 大きな)
I get your point that there might not be a systematic or etymological pattern interesting or significant enough to merit a full-time inquiry, but I wouldn't say that it is just "a mess". You could be dismissing something big and important by proscribing it as just something arbitrary. If it is arbitrary, that doesn't necessarily mean it is inane, and it still might be worthwhile to approach it critically, even if just as an exercise. But I do get what you say so, ノートしました。
Nov
22
comment Are there any common grammatical errors made by native Japanese speakers?
Those aren't really good examples of "grammatical errors". "You're"/"your" is just spelling and most of the time its not even a legitimate mistake. Also mistakes in text/print are usually not mistakes of language but mistakes of typing or editing and whatnot. I would also take special heed to oldergod's comment on the distinction between "semi-tolerated emergent conventions" and a true linguistic error. The latter are by far much more interesting, especially when the culprit is perverse enough to violate a linguistic universal, and not just a language particular.
Nov
21
comment Which forms of a verb do I need to memorize to distinguish ichidan from godan?
I had to read your Q several times to understand it. It's a good question but you might want to consider taking a moment to reword it so that its a bit more clear as to what's being asked. And if you're asking 2 Q's then you should clearly delineate each one.
Nov
21
comment Is accent position predictable for -i verbs in Osaka/Kansai?
@dainichi yeah I forget to mention that Tokyo いadjectives are first categorized as atonic and tonic. Within the latter category there is only one single accent pattern. thanks for pointing that out. are you sure 無い is a final adjective? if you're confident, i'd like you to add it yourself. that way the edit history will reflect your contribution.
Nov
19
comment Is accent position predictable for -i verbs in Osaka/Kansai?
In reflection this seems a bit longer than it needed to be lolz. I just wanted to mention that those PDFs are from my Dropbox, a free promotional cloud storage if you use the Ubuntu operating system so I have no idea how long they will be around for downloading.
Nov
18
comment Is accent position predictable for -i verbs in Osaka/Kansai?
A small number of exceptions won't invalidate any of the rules above because these rules are linguistic generalizations, not inviolable universals. The best set of rules will minimize exceptions.
Nov
15
comment Is accent position predictable for -i verbs in Osaka/Kansai?
@alexandrec yes i think you're right. i guess this is good. one other mention though, adjectives like ええ (and others) must be considered as monomoraic, not bimoraic. the reason is that the accent, which is a phonological process, associates before the phonetic lengthening which is a derivational process (occurring after all phonological processes finish). i'm working out an answer, but if this Q is properly reformulated with this, i can save space not having to explain this in my A.
Nov
11
comment Is accent position predictable for -i verbs in Osaka/Kansai?
You should change the title to "Are accent positions predictable in Kansaiben?" and ask the general case. Even though Kansaiben is known and assumed as a dialect, the term is informal and not used very often by linguists. Nonetheless, it's a functioning word, and that's the name that the majority of JLU users know it by.
Nov
11
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
I should point out that in my answer here I only mentioned phonemic string writing with the IPA. Phonetic string writing, which is the transcription of allophones not phonemes, takes place with the same symbols but '[]' braces are used instead of '//' slashes as delimiters. Phonemes are preverbal "units of sound", they don't actually have an acoustic signature. A phoneme string is retrieved, processed and converted into a allophonic string (which has a phonetic signature) during speech articulation.
Nov
11
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
@dainichi yeah, you're right, it's underspecified. I need to think about how to fix that without mentioning allophones though.
Nov
10
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
I wrote a sloppy machine readable mapping a little while back, you can look at it to just get a sense of the size and complexity of the task forum.gaijinpot.com/…
Sep
21
comment Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
This is really bugging me. Speech recognition textbooks usually assume the signal to symbol conversion has already been done, and so doesn't address the spectral computation to match signal to (candidate) phoneme. I recently found a textbook for analysing the raw speech spectra, but it will be a long while until I can come back here myself and give an answer with actual numerical evidence (you did after all ask for a phonetic description). I encourage anyone to provide a more satisfactory answer than mine! This is probably too specialized to be a bounty question.