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"Ack! Bar?" -Allahu

吾輩は猫である。名前はまだ無い。


Nov
11
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
I should point out that in my answer here I only mentioned phonemic string writing with the IPA. Phonetic string writing, which is the transcription of allophones not phonemes, takes place with the same symbols but '[]' braces are used instead of '//' slashes as delimiters. Phonemes are preverbal "units of sound", they don't actually have an acoustic signature. A phoneme string is retrieved, processed and converted into a allophonic string (which has a phonetic signature) during speech articulation.
Nov
11
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 201 characters in body
Nov
11
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
@dainichi yeah, you're right, it's underspecified. I need to think about how to fix that without mentioning allophones though.
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 19 characters in body
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 19 characters in body
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 19 characters in body
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 19 characters in body
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
added 93 characters in body
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
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Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
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Nov
10
comment Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
I wrote a sloppy machine readable mapping a little while back, you can look at it to just get a sense of the size and complexity of the task forum.gaijinpot.com/…
Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
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Nov
10
revised Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
deleted 8 characters in body
Nov
10
answered Does an international OR standardized phonetic alphabet/notation system exist to depict all the Hiragana/Katakana sounds?
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
21
comment Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
This is really bugging me. Speech recognition textbooks usually assume the signal to symbol conversion has already been done, and so doesn't address the spectral computation to match signal to (candidate) phoneme. I recently found a textbook for analysing the raw speech spectra, but it will be a long while until I can come back here myself and give an answer with actual numerical evidence (you did after all ask for a phonetic description). I encourage anyone to provide a more satisfactory answer than mine! This is probably too specialized to be a bounty question.
Sep
21
comment Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
@AmandaS Your're right, they're not dropped in the sense that at the lexical level they are always most definitely present. When devoicing occurs either the voiceless segment will be the same duration as if it were voiced, or there will be prosodic compensation from a neighbouring segment. In other words, even if it is phonetically absent its prosodic weight still must realize phonologically and phonetically. So it's the inviolability of this prosodic weight that native speakers intuit as the incapacity to be "dropped".
Sep
21
comment Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
I've seen transcriptions for total deletion too, particularly [des] where [s] then becomes prosodically lengthened to fill the intended timing tier. Though です is such a frequent word I wouldn't be surprised if it had an exceptional pronunciation.
Sep
21
revised Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
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Sep
21
comment Is there a logic behind the different endings when counting things in Japanese
The believe that one language is more concise than another is an absolute myth. Every language is equally expressive, the fact that some indigenous language doesn't have words for "millisecond" or "cell-phone" is a cultural particular, not a deficit of language as matter of some sort of innate difference in linguistic structure. If you don't believe me, just think about it and try to formulate it more technically or at least make a verifiable claim. I think you'll find it a vacuous assertion.