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seen Aug 16 '13 at 16:05

"Ack! Bar?" -Allahu

吾輩は猫である。名前はまだ無い。


Jul
17
revised Linguistics and Japanese study
added 249 characters in body
Jul
17
answered Linguistics and Japanese study
Jul
17
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
17
revised Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
deleted 4 characters in body
Jul
17
revised Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
deleted 210 characters in body
Jul
17
comment Utterance initial [ɾ]
@BillyNair okay I'll write an explanation, but it will take a bit of time
Jul
16
revised Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
added 4 characters in body
Jul
16
comment Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
You could always take this program fon.hum.uva.nl/praat, record Japanese speakers and generate data and analysis yourself. Interpreting the analysis and the actual testing of hypotheses would be the difficult part.
Jul
16
revised Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
added 41 characters in body
Jul
16
answered Actual phonetic realization of “devoiced” vowels
Jul
16
comment 不被下候: When was it common, and what were the rules?
@sawa could just be a metaphorical usage.
Jul
16
awarded  Organizer
Jul
16
revised When is マイ・ワイフ used?
edited tags
Jul
16
revised When is マイ・ワイフ used?
added 4 characters in body
Jul
16
answered When is マイ・ワイフ used?
Jul
16
comment How to translate standalone noun + a ます verb (in a heading)
Unfortunately, the permissibility of [NはADです]->[N、AD] as given doesn't necessarily imply the permissibility of [NをVます]->[N, Vます]. If you were getting downvoted, it might be bcuz ppl don't like your description of "The/that burglar, I'll catch him" being poetic. You should rather say stylized or deviant. Old English did not have the modern SVO word order of today, both SOV and VSO were both acceptable in Old English. Instead case particles had the role of word order. That's why mixing word order can sometimes seem novel or exotic (read poetic) when in fact it's just old syntax (read literary).
Jul
16
comment Why the “H” is pronounced as “Sh” in some cases?
I don't think /sja/ is an attested phonemic sequence. /s/ has phonemic status as does /ɕ/, but I'm pretty sure the "shi" phone is the result of /ɕi/ not a palatalized /s/ in /sja/. To convince you of this, take the following attested CV (V=semivowel) strings {pj, bj, tj, dj, kj, ɡj} as in {ぴょいと /pjoito/, 病気 /bjoːki/, テューバ /tjɯːba/, デュオ /djɯo/, 今日 /kjoː/, 逆 /ɡjakɯ/}. The point is that if the consonant has a [∓voicing] feature, then both [+voicing] and [-voicing] forms can occur as C/j/ sequences. To follow this pattern you would have to accept /zj/.
Jul
16
comment Can genki be pronounced as henki?
This sounds right to me. I can't possibly imagine a speaker saying /henki/. Although, in fast speech the velar plosive /ɡ/ can be realized as the velar fricative [ɣ] as long as it is both preceded and followed by a vowel or semivowel (The Sounds of Japanese, Vance, 2008, page 76). Since, we are talking about an utterance-initial /ɡ/ I don't know if it's eligible for this plosive->fricative weakening. But this sloppy kind of speech wouldn't appear in anime unless it was overtly gruff.
Jul
16
revised Pronunciation of す in です and the end of ます verbs
added 35 characters in body
Jul
16
awarded  Commentator