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seen Dec 26 '12 at 14:23

Feb
26
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Feb
22
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
12
comment How can the uses of 「は」and「が」 in this sentence be justified?
This is just a guess, but does the use of は instead of が in "先勝は午後は" not put more emphasis on the contrasting time periods? (A is in the morning, whereas B is in the afternoon, etc.). It's almost as if you can guess just from the presence of that は after 午後 that some other time periods are coming and that the time period is going to be the critical aspect in making the distinction between A, B, and C.
Sep
11
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
13
comment Can the suffix -人 be used to express heritage?
I think it's worth mentioning that this is, to my mind, quite an American way of speaking. I'm South African, and if someone tells me they're Irish, I will most likely literally assume that they're Irish (nationality, birth, etc.) unless it's clear from the context that they mean of Irish descent. So as stated in the answers, just saying アイルランド人 would probably be pretty ambiguous in Japanese, :)
Jun
7
accepted Does バラの寝床 come directly from the English expression “bed of roses”?
Jun
7
comment Does バラの寝床 come directly from the English expression “bed of roses”?
@con5013d, thank you for your answer! I'm going to accept because if the phrase was coined by Christopher Marlowe, it seems like it must have been absorbed into Japanese at some point (either by Murakami or elsewhere) and because your quote from the Publisher's Weekly interview certainly gives nice insight into Murakami's style, :). The thing that I still wonder about is how this phrase would read to a native speaker... It seems like, unless their English was very good, they could easily mistake it for an original phrase of Murakami's. Quite sneaky really, if you ask me.
Jun
6
asked Does バラの寝床 come directly from the English expression “bed of roses”?
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Jun
8
awarded  Commentator
Jun
8
comment 全然 {ぜんぜん} with positive adjective / na-adjective
I think that dialect also plays a part here. For example, I've heard that it's more common in kansaiben to use 全然 with a positive copula. Not confident enough to risk an answer though :]
Jun
8
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
7
awarded  Beta
Jun
7
comment What is the difference between その and あの?
Hmm, @deceze, your answer seems to contradict @phirru's answer somewhat. And I'm hardly in a position to judge which is correct :|
Jun
7
accepted What is the difference between その and あの?
Jun
7
comment What is the difference between その and あの?
Excellent answer, thank you! That's exactly what I wanted clarified.
Jun
7
comment What to say after someone sneezes
I triple-sneeze like all the time...
Jun
7
comment What is the difference between その and あの?
Thanks for your explanation! Does it matter whether or not you are dealing with a shared experience? That is, can I use その時 when referring to an event that happened while the listener was not present?