167 reputation
7
bio website anton.strogonoff.name
location
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jan 23 at 2:47

Aug
10
comment What does カッコいいじゃーん mean?
Likely she started with katakana to give additional emphasis to かっこいい, but halfway released shift key on her keyboard (used to enter katakana mode on some systems) and ended with hiragana. Could've been done on purpose (いい means “good”, informal writing, everything is possible), or just because of (possibly intended) sloppy typing. Or both.
Jun
27
reviewed Excellent Question about subject
Jun
27
reviewed Excellent Can ご存じです function as a transitive verb?
Jun
27
reviewed Satisfactory Using 着 Classifier
Jun
27
reviewed Satisfactory What's the meaning of しない as in …するしない?
Jun
27
reviewed Excellent What's the most appropriate negative potential form for this situation?
Jun
27
reviewed Satisfactory Questions with some usages of で
Jun
27
reviewed Needs Improvement Help translating this japanese sentence please?
Jun
27
awarded  Custodian
Jun
27
reviewed Excellent What is the correct way to say 小さい『つ』?
Jun
27
reviewed Needs Improvement Why don't radicals have the same definition for all kanji?
Jun
27
reviewed Satisfactory Legal characters for first names include: hiragana, katakana, jinmeiyo and joyo kanji. What about latin letters?
Nov
19
comment How is 名 pronounced in computer terms?
It's interesting though how in Japanese you don't have to verbalise while reading kanji. E.g., in 「Skype名」 you just see ‘name’—no need to think how exactly to pronounce 名 (unless you have to say it out loud). I think it's cool—you quicker get to the meaning, skipping unnecessary reading. On the other hand, it's probably since I'm just a beginner and don't know how to pronounce things. =) I'm curious whether native speakers usually verbalise written kanji or not… Although I guess it's not easy to find out.
Sep
24
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Aug
19
comment What is the difference between 言うな! and 言ってんじゃねぇぞ?
@Matt, Enno: AFAIR in some very informal settings abrupt ‘stop talking’ may sound way more harsh than relaxed ‘shut up’ or even ruder expressions. So, with regard to Japanese specifics, is it true that 言ってんじゃねえぞ would be more insulting than 言うな in any context regardless of intonation? Or there's just no point in taking extreme cases into the account?
Aug
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
21
awarded  Scholar
Jul
21
accepted けど at the end of the sentence?
Jul
21
comment けど at the end of the sentence?
Yep, I understand this. I think, this answer along with the comment thread deserves to be accepted. The problem turned out to be not with 「けど」 in particular, but it still may be useful for someone, I guess.
Jul
21
comment けど at the end of the sentence?
Wow, so that the answer is basically that 「けど」 does mean ‘but’ in these cases, it's just that the second part is omitted. I knew that lots of implied stuff in Japanese is a norm, but it never occured to me that it's just another form of it. Thanks a lot, @Greg Sotiros!