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Jul
24
comment What does ちょちょい mean?
I tried asking him directly but no response so far.
Jul
23
comment Are there words so bad that they aren't allowed on television?
I think I understand what @repecmps is trying to get at: "Isn't this question about words that are inherently bad, that anyone will instinctively avoid using them at a public occassion, like on TV?" In that case, it seems correct, since Dave has reframed his question to a similar angle. However, I don't think Rolf's (now deleted) question was treated unjustly, because, from what I remember, it wasn't well scoped and answerable like Dave's questions are.
Jul
21
comment General applicability of the ~ませ conjugation
There are 1M+ results for 召しませ, a phrase I've heard from time to time but neglected to look up its exact meaning. Is this another exception?
Jul
14
comment Share your list of stock phrases / phrase templates
@Pacerier: I originally meant it to be something along the line of "the spot-on, ultimate weapon you wield when you're in a certain situation", like "killer app", but not "killer bee". However, checking up on Google told me "killer phrase" is mostly used in the "killer bee" sense, so I've changed it to "stock phrases". Thanks for pointing out!
Jul
14
comment Share your list of stock phrases / phrase templates
@Dave: Thanks for the input. - I hope to have avoided the subjective-open-endedness by asking for a real list that you actually use, which adds objectiveness to the answer. Reading up on Guidelines for Great Subjective Questions leaves me feeling it's a-ok, especially since the question meets guideline "4. .. invites sharing experiences over opinions." Still, deciding which answer to vote can be subjective here.
Jul
14
comment Share your list of stock phrases / phrase templates
@HerrKaleun I'll take that into account when I re-organize it next time, which should be very soon. Thanks!
Jul
13
comment What is the origin of the theatrical intonation used by Tokyo Disneyland's cast members?
Thanks for bringing in a global perspective. I'm getting convinced that it's a cultural universal thing. Here's a clip from Hong Kong Disneyland's Jungle Cruise.
Jul
13
comment How would I say “Get well soon”?
@Lain - you can add 家族一同 to the front to make it explicit: 家族一同、ご全快の一日も早いことを...
Jul
7
comment What does ちょちょい mean?
I suppose these tweets curated.by/ento/-2 constitute the full context of the example sentence. The tweeter (マオ) is from Fukuoka: wikipedia
Jun
30
comment When is a person referred to with 様 in the mass media and what does it signify?
@Dave thx, 削除しました!
Jun
30
comment To not have: 持っていません or ありません?
@Amanda いえいえ. I should add that your professors are still correct about 主人はあります under normal circumstances. You say 私には主人があります only when you want to emphasize the binding tie that exists between you and your husband. ref: 日本語Q&A
Jun
30
comment To not have: 持っていません or ありません?
I think I might have gone too far in saying there is no way for ありません to mean "I have no membership card." I'm feeling a bit of a Gestaltzerfall now from replaying the phrase too much in my head, like when you've stared at a kanji for too long and it begins to lose coherence..
Jun
30
comment To not have: 持っていません or ありません?
According to Daijirin's definition (3)-2, it can be used to refer to people when ある人が、家族・親戚・友人などをもっている (when saying someone "has" a family member, relative or friend). 私には夫はありません is actually from a bible verse. Adding sources to the quotes..
Jun
29
comment Are there any metaphors in these Japanese sentences?
@Kafka - Great write up. One thing I don't agree is the part about "日々薄れてく 記憶": I think that translates to "my memories grow thin day by day." Less artistic while more idiomatic.
Jun
29
comment 芸能人・スポーツ選手・公人に「さん」などの敬称を付けなくてもよい理由は?
@Dave Thanks for the edit. / That's an interesting one, 'さま'. I've added a question about that issue here. I hope you can help out there with the source and/or context of "ビンラデン様" (I can't remember hearing it on TV)
Jun
28
comment 芸能人・スポーツ選手・公人に「さん」などの敬称を付けなくてもよい理由は?
Thanks for you answer. The interesting thing is, reporters add "san" to famous people in local news articles: ex. "プロゴルファーの石川遼さん". Also, there are other titles in stock that could be used, like 氏. (I think the question title was too narrow in this sense.. going to edit now)
Jun
27
comment 芸能人・スポーツ選手・公人に「さん」などの敬称を付けなくてもよい理由は?
@hippietrail: good idea. taking a peek there now =)
Jun
27
comment 芸能人・スポーツ選手・公人に「さん」などの敬称を付けなくてもよい理由は?
@hippietrail: I agree it would be a stretch to call it universal offhandedly.
Jun
27
comment 芸能人・スポーツ選手・公人に「さん」などの敬称を付けなくてもよい理由は?
@repecmps: Ah, so "Beckham" means an abstract entity embodying the concept of "Beckhamness", not a person. That seems plausible to me, but again a complete guess.
Jun
27
comment Etymology of 右に出る
@repecmps: Thanks, I see clearly now.