4,372 reputation
930
bio website area51.stackexchange.com/…
location Japan
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Sep 4 at 8:19

[promo] If you are learning Lojban, or want to speak a machine-parsable constructed language, please help this Area 51 proposal come to life: Lojban Language & Usage. Lojbanists, e'o ko sidju


I'm a software engineer. One of the rare species who use Python at work in Japan and also telecommute.

Currently I'm working on:

  • Becoming fluent in Lojban and also creating learning tools along the way
  • Becoming a lucid dreamer

I have lived in Massachusetts, Kyoto, Fukuoka and Tokyo.


Nov
11
comment Is this sentence making a comparison?
It's possible to read 何か as なんか, as in 何 {なに/なん} かおかしい "Something's wrong". But it doesn't automatically mean "something like..."; it can also mean "what" depending on the semantic context, for example, それは何 {なに/なん} かと言うと "To tell you what it is.." Even in this JLPT sentence, it's not impossible to read it as 宗教とはなんか and let it mean "what a religion is", if you suppose the author has a peculiar tendency of mixing casual speech (なんか) with a formal one (とは..)
Nov
10
comment Is this sentence making a comparison?
I was just going to correct the furigana for 何か as なに(か), but then realized it must be where you took the wrong turn. Tsuyoshi's answer should become obvious if you decompose the first phrase as 宗教/religion とは/is なに/what か/? (I'm adding this comment to the question itself so future editors won't spoil the mystery by correcting the furigana.)
Nov
8
awarded  Civic Duty
Nov
2
revised The meaning, usage and cultural significance of the word [苦]{く}[笑]{しょう}
corrected furigana for お迎え待ち中
Oct
26
comment Article versus postposition
In the spirit of collaboratively improving questions and answers, I took the liberty of removing your request for comments, which can be misleading in a structured Q&A site like this, striving to be different from a free-form bulletin board. I also tacked on the question you wrote in a comment to the end of the question body so a latecomer can understand what it's about at a glance. Please feel free to roll back the edit or make further edits.
Oct
26
revised Article versus postposition
removed the 'request for comment' part, added the question the OP wrote in a comment
Oct
26
revised Article versus postposition
a few typo fixes, make the original paragraphs more outstanding
Oct
21
comment two levels for teiru and rare
@NateGlenn taberareteirareru and taberareterarete are two different beasts: verb + particle(s) + verb + particle(s) -- so it's not simply a 'double -rare-' -- vs verb + particle(s) + particle(s). taberareterarete, being syntactically incorrect, can't even begin to appeal for a valid meaning to be assigned to it, emphasis or whatever else.
Oct
21
comment two levels for teiru and rare
@TsuyoshiIto I thought there must be a generic rule like "particle Q can attach only to verbs and particles B, C, D." Not necessarily as specific as "100-0a. You can't say られてられて; 100-0b. You can't say いている; ..."
Oct
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to use ~に同意する to agree or disagree with a person?
Oct
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do you avoid multiple が in a sentence
Oct
14
revised Board / Card game expressions
added terms used in dominion (but generally applicable)
Oct
7
revised What are the different nuances of saying 変{へん}?
corrected typo in tag
Oct
5
revised two levels for teiru and rare
added call for grammatical explanation
Oct
5
comment What romanization scheme is used by programmers?
@KarlKnechtel "onomatopoeia" - Exactly. Japanese has separate terms for sound imitation words (ぎおんご) and sight imitation words (ぎたいご) and I hoped to capture both by "imitative". But all the English definitions of "imitative word" I can find seem to lean towards sound imitations. hummm
Oct
4
comment two levels for teiru and rare
@TsuyoshiIto Oh, good news =D
Oct
4
answered two levels for teiru and rare
Oct
4
comment What romanization scheme is used by programmers?
@KarlKnechtel I don't think any of them has a concrete meaning, but fuga and piyo, when repeated, are valid imitatives (擬態語 [ぎたいご] / 擬音語 [ぎおんご] ): fugafuga, piyopiyo. pakeratta probably comes from a fictional character's stock phrase (ref: chiebukuro)
Oct
3
revised What romanization scheme is used by programmers?
corrected grammar
Oct
3
answered What romanization scheme is used by programmers?