1,400 reputation
28
bio website kylheku.com
location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 2 years
seen Apr 16 at 2:13

Check out the TXR language http://www.nongnu.org/txr


May
11
comment Difference between 丸い and 円い
This jisho has the info: wwwjdic.org (Jim Breen's WWWJDIC). Both spellings are marked with a P which means both are preferred.
May
10
comment Is タオル used for the towels used at onsen?
A better way to ask might be これは 日本語で 何と 言うのですか? "kore wa, nihongo de, nan to iu n desu ka?" ("... nan te iu no?" with friends). Asking what do you call this in Japanese is a little better than asking what it is. Though they understand, since you're a foreigner from a land where they have towels; but if you were Japanese, that question would look like you've never seen a towel before!
May
8
comment What exactly is ありき?
@Jesse Your comment got me interested. Turns out, this story was based on actual events. There really was such a person, Sugaya Tokuji, and his letter translating shop was on that street. articles.latimes.com/1985-12-25/local/me-21169_1_love-letter
May
8
comment What is the difference between 見える/聞こえる and 見られる/聞ける?
By the way, on a phonentic, tangent, "rareru" iften becomes "reru" in speech. This change has a name: it is called "ranuki" (ら抜き). Removal of the "ra".
May
6
comment Can there be such a thing as のんでましょう?
You will never get much more than that of anything, no matter what. There is no search in which you can actually scroll through a million results. Google results are capped. Which is not to say that the "hits" number is some exact count (it is an estimate), but going exhaustively through the search doesn't disprove the number. It doesn't mean "this is how many results you can scroll through below".
May
5
comment Can there be such a thing as のんでましょう?
I agree with you. You have to read some of what is actually being "hit". There could be misspellings, or substring matches that don't even mean what you're looking for (like the suffix of what you're searching for is actually a fragment of another word).
May
2
comment What is the たて in 取れる+たて?
About your question; sorry, I dare not hypothesize any more about that. The answer you graciously accepted also "works for me" and the "decision stands" analogy fits intuitively. The idea that "standing" is a cross-cultural metaphor for persisting in a state appear sound.
May
2
comment Is there a difference between んがため and ために?
Aha, I seem to remember one of the answers I pointed to in that discussion discusses む versus ぬ. I will go back to that and read it in detail.
May
1
comment What is the difference between ~すぎ and ~すぎる?
Ah, what must have happened is that I had a garbled edit of this, and ended up saving it accidentally. I'm sure I had it right at some point, but somehow the wrong thing ended up in the answer.
May
1
comment What is the difference between ~すぎ and ~すぎる?
Thanks a lot. I'm going back to look at the prior version. I remember I was struggling with the IME to get it to accept what I'm typing and produce the proper katakana: アルゴリスム体操. This makes for a nice example because it is highly google-able, and points to a fun little tidbit of popular culture. I'm going to put it back; hope ジョンさん does not mind.
May
1
comment Why does お[馬鹿]{ばか}さん contain honorific お?
@ジョン I will take another look. Being lazy, I will get someone Japanese to look over the sentence; I just played it loose and wrote Japanese the way I'm used to hearing it. The ことわず (saying) 灯台基暗し (toudai moto kurashi) deserves an explanation: it means that "it is dark at the base of the lighthouse", a metaphor for the situation of not being able to find what is misplaced right under your nose, so to speak (another metaphor from our own English: it is dark under the nose too, evidently).
Apr
30
comment Why does お[馬鹿]{ばか}さん contain honorific お?
The honorific particle makes it soft, as well as the -san suffix. Baka is harsh.
Apr
30
comment What would be a proper definition and adequate natural translation for the term 替え歌王?
This one is hilarious: youtube.com/watch?v=cFv6GU9CQ8g  Singer Ichirou Mizuki, aged 61, (水木一郎, 61歳) evidently turns an old anime song into a version that is actually about the life of the parody singer: 替え歌ヒーロー (Parody Song Hero). I understand bits and pieces enough to get a good laugh out of it. :) The cool thing is that he originally performed the real song back in 1977.
Apr
30
comment Can we have two thematic は particles in a sentence?
Also, we can't make it 私が, because that is not the same, "From the 19th to the end of the month, the person who isn't going is me". So, what I'm getting to is that this is not "technically incorrect".
Apr
30
comment Can we have two thematic は particles in a sentence?
These usages fit with Tanimori's description of multiple は marking subordinate clauses. So the time interval "from the 19th to the end of the month" is the topic. And then the "watashi" in "watashi will not go" is not the topic. In relation to the topic, it is "watashi" who will not go at that time (but maybe other people will). If we reverse the order of these two, then it becomes: about me (the topic) I won't go at that time (but maybe I will go at some other time). There is a kind of contrast in the second は in either case: watashi against other people, or the time against other times.
Apr
29
comment Role of の in そんなの
Possessive isn't the right word; I was just using it for convenience. My reasoning (perhaps wrong) is justified like this. Makino and Tsutsui (A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar) recognize four different kinds of の. The AのB no relating A and B (what I called "possessive", clarifying that it's not just for possessive relations); the Aの where no is like a pronoun similar to "one"; the nominalizing の; and the sentence final の used mostly by women and children. This そんなの答え seems to fits the pattern AのB better than it fits the other patterns because there is a B and A is not a clause.
Apr
29
comment What differences, if any, are there between 婦 and 女?
Sure, and the "fu" in "kung fu" is 夫, the kanji for "husband". So kung fu must have something to do with married guys. Aha! It's something they go do to get away from their wives.
Apr
28
comment Usage of doubled non-past tense “た”
Interesting. In Japanese, there is a way to say "be in the state of having eaten it": 食べちゃって.
Apr
28
comment Role of の in そんなの
Good question; I suspect this this may be the case of an elided/understood こと, as in: そんなことの答え . I think suspect there is looseness in の because of the existence of the other form, like 甘いの. It is used with nouns which have particles, too: あなたからの手紙 (the letter from you).
Apr
28
comment Role of の in そんなの
Bug: the double-asterisk notation gives me a nice bold in the edit preview, but when I save the answer, it turns into italicized kanji with asterisks around it.