1,419 reputation
29
bio website kylheku.com
location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jun 12 at 15:11

Check out the TXR language http://www.nongnu.org/txr


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
1
comment The process behind キャ in loanwords from English
How about sources other than English? Where in the German "rucksack" do we hear a "ryu" that leads to "ryukusaku"?
Apr
7
comment Is there a kanji for しか?
しかも and しかし can be written 然も and 然し. The etymology is different, but I think in spite of that, this might be a good choice of kanji spelling for しか if such a thing needed to be invented. The rationale being is that it comes from existing grammatical connecting words.
Mar
29
awarded  Yearling
Nov
25
comment 一番下のむす子 Translation
First Google hit for 昼寝: ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%98%BC%E5%AF%9D You can use kanji in the search engine. Wink!
Nov
25
comment 一番下のむす子 Translation
Think: 年下 (toshishita).
Nov
5
comment What is the etymology of べき? How should I visualize it?
もっと勉強する「べし」だよ~!(^^)
Nov
2
comment Interpretation of 注意する: to warn or to be warned?
@TsuyoshiIto Those examples supposedly come from something called the "Tanaka Corpus" Quote: "The original collection contained large numbers of errors, both in the Japanese and English. Many of the errors were in spelling and transcription, although in a significant number of cases the Japanese and English contained grammatical, syntactic, etc. errors, or the translations did not match at all. " Hmm.
Nov
1
answered Interpretation of 注意する: to warn or to be warned?
Nov
1
comment “I would stop missing you the moment we meet again”
@user54609 Indeed. "I would stop missing you the moment we meet again" is only grammatical as a relative clause in a conditional. "I would stop missing you the moment we meet again, if I actually liked you and missed you in the first place; but I don't."
Oct
31
answered “I would stop missing you the moment we meet again”
Oct
31
comment Where does “もしもし” (moshimoshi) for answering the telephone come from?
^Also, suppose someone has unintentionally dropped a valuable object and walked away. You can chase after that person and get their attention with もしもし. I see that as more suitable than sumimasen, because you don't have anything to excuse yourself for.
Oct
30
comment 名前, does it have English Roots?
@user54609 However, it's not as far off from German's "Name" (ナーメ).
Oct
30
comment Confusion on use of する with adverbs
@TsuyoshiIto I think I know what you mean because although we sometimes think of, say, hayaku as an adverb ("hayaku hashiru"), if we want to say that something became fast (i.e. came on to have the adjective property of speed!) it is hayaKU natta: the same form as the adverbial use. Plus, it looks like any ajective can inflect to that form, including things that can't be derived into adverbs in English, like aoi -> aoku (no "became bluely").
Oct
30
comment What does 忘れたい人 mean?
@TsuyoshiIto Point taken! Context matters, always!!! But basically here we are discussing only fragments out of context.
Oct
30
revised What does 忘れたい人 mean?
added 1411 characters in body
Oct
29
comment What does 忘れたい人 mean?
@snailboat In that clause, there is an explicit object, and so the object of forgetting cannot be the person. The clause is taking the perspective of knowing the person's feelings and using -tai, which I didn't rule out as being impossible. I added a few things to the answer to round it out.
Oct
29
revised What does 忘れたい人 mean?
added 302 characters in body
Oct
29
comment Confusion on use of する with adverbs
So "slowly" isn't really an adverb, just a conjugated version of the "slow" adjective.
Oct
29
answered What does 忘れたい人 mean?