4,805 reputation
2280
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Kagoshima-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 1 hour ago

I'm hitchhiking around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now in Kagoshima after over a month in Okinawa.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Mar
6
comment Why can some words be written with or without okurigana? How do the uses differ?
I'm voting you up because your answer shows that just as there really are two ways to write まきがい, there really are also two meanings of "correct". One for people who think like descriptive linguists, and one for not losing points when dealing with certain kinds of people marking or judging your writing.
Mar
6
comment Why can some words be written with or without okurigana? How do the uses differ?
This answer would be even better if it included a clue to what "the official one" is unless you feel Google Translate will do a good enough job of that page on mext.go.jp ...
Mar
6
comment Yakiniku (焼き肉 or 焼肉)
I think you mean six of one, half a dozen of the other. (-:
Mar
5
comment Japanese typing questions
@Tor: I agree with you that this is about Japanese usage. I would say it's on-topic in my personal opinion. I'm not sure it's a good Stack Exchange question for other reasons though since it might be more about discussion than getting a definitive answer. I'm not sure that it would be on-topic on linguistics.SE but it might come under "computational linguistics". It could also come under "user experience" though, which has its own SE site. It is an interesting question! Maybe try asking it on Quora, which has fewer rules than here.
Mar
3
comment What words are used for dolphin meat?
I've seen packaged dolphin meat for sale in Japan. I think it was in one of the places selling local specialties in a 道の駅, but it might have been in a supermarket. Somewhere in the past four years I think when I was hitchhiking in Tohoku or somewhere north and my Japanese driver pointed it out to me.
Mar
3
comment Who decides what katakana will be used to form English loan words?
@LucasTizma: Linguists don't actually have any concept at all like "phonetic language". This is because linguists don't study writing systems, spelling, etc. (Those fields are studied by other specialists though.) Linguists study naturally occurring human languages and regard writing as a technology recently added to a relatively small number of languages and having little effect on the languages themselves. (One exception is that the character-based writing system of Chinese has left a big impression on Chinese being a monosyllabic language.)
Mar
3
comment Will verbal irony and sarcasm be understood and/or appreciated?
Don't worry. English and Australian people think Americans don't have sarcasm or irony too. Really. So I'm sure that the actual case is that all cultures have them but express them a bit differently and/or to different degrees.
Mar
3
comment How can I differentiate agreement with the person and agreement with the idea?
"Sure" used this way is not very common outside North American English. I'm not sure about Canada but it's not really used in the United Kingdom or Australia.
Mar
3
comment “Formal” Japanese and “honorific” Japanese, are completely different, right?
Even though they are separate it's probably perfectly natural for them to influence each other, which careful writers like Mishima are careful not to do.
Mar
2
comment Decomposition of kanji
Sometimes if you are lucky you can find insights into Unicode's decision making process via their mailing lists. They're searchable with Google too.
Mar
1
comment 返{かえ}る / 戻{もど}る vs “come back” / “go back” / “return”
Related question, but not the same: Am I coming or going? 戻ってくる vs 戻っていく
Mar
1
comment 返{かえ}る / 戻{もど}る vs “come back” / “go back” / “return”
@virmaior: I'm a beginner so I'm surely missing a lot from all of my posts (-: ... Actually I did come across that one but it seemed to me "to go home", which is what my local friend thought I said when I said "kaeru" meaning "go/come back / return".
Feb
28
comment できる vs ~えます form for “can”, “able to”
@dainichi: Is it that できる has to be used in combination with ことが? I've spotted this in constructions in this and the previous question but I never learned that so don't know how to understand it.
Feb
28
comment できる vs ~えます form for “can”, “able to”
I'm such a beginner, even though I kind of know a few things, that it's really hard for me to spot duplicates. I didn't even know if the potential form tag really belonged here. By the way, I think I said "読んで出来ます" (I can read it).
Feb
27
comment Are “ピーナッツ” and “ピーナツ” both correct for “peanut(s)”?
@Earthliŋ: Thanks for the heads-up. I've been gone for a long time.
Feb
27
comment Are “ピーナッツ” and “ピーナツ” both correct for “peanut(s)”?
Just a casual drive-by downvote? Or is there some constructive criticism coming along later when you have the energy?
Feb
25
comment Pronouncing が as 'nga'
@jpierson: In API "j" has the sound it has in some languages such as Dutch and German, namely it sounds like English "y". IPA uses "y" for a vowel sound not found in English. So basically IPA /nja/ would sound like English "nya" or "nyah".
Feb
25
comment How to say “no thank you, I don't want / need it”?
If "いいです" is a more correct answer for my indicated situations than whatever's answer then please write it up and submit it and I will vote it up.
Feb
25
comment How to say “no thank you, I don't want / need it”?
Does "kekkou desu" also work for my examples of plastic bag, drinking straw, disposable chopsticks, etc?
Oct
6
comment Is the word ハーフ derogatory?
Related article: In Japan, Will Hafu Ever Be Considered Whole?