5,123 reputation
22989
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Tamarama, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Aug 12 at 11:31

I've just finished a 9.5 month hitchhiking trip around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now back home between trips.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
I think it's perfectly fine to answer in Japanese only if the OP asked in English but the answerer cannot answer in English. But I would certainly appreciate if somebody could edit in a translation so I can understand too and then I can also vote accordingly. (-:
Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
@TokyoNagoya and ash sorry しる was a typo for する. Ash, Those examples look like they count. Is that ググる "to Google"? I expected the る to also be katakana ル so could be just what I'm looking for. I'm not familiar with the other words though to be able to say either way. But I'll look them up now ...
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
Yes in English we even say "try and see".
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
Is this みる related to 見る? I recently learned that when words gain grammatical / auxiliary functions that those will be written only in hiragana.
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
I don't know. ~てみる didn't show up in the dictionaries I looked in or when I quizzed the Japanese around me.
Apr
2
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
No I hadn't noticed but that's just the kind of thing I love. It seems this is a very productive manner of word formation as well as a cool way to use verbs like adjectives.
Apr
2
comment Specific differences to consider between any individual katakana and hiragana?
One other time you see ー with hiragana is when typing, briefly, before the IME converts the hiragana to katakana.
Apr
2
comment Specific differences to consider between any individual katakana and hiragana?
@kinyo: Katakana used to be used for particles before the reform that happened just after the war.
Apr
2
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
Well Japanese certainly seems to be one of those tricky languages when it comes to morphosyntax and making analytical decisions about affixes and bound morphemes, etc.
Apr
1
comment Are both spellings for ふけ (fuke) “dandruff” ateji? If not what's actually going on?
Oddly the katakana is the one form that is not in WWWJDIC! This also highlights the problems of learning vocabulary from dictionaries, especially for Japanese with the various scripts increasing the number of potential spellings.
Mar
31
comment When an -i form (連用形{れんようけい}) of a verb seems to be a suffix rather than a prefix?
Yes that's why I said "somewhat". You can almost never make direct comparisons between any features of any two languages really.
Mar
31
comment When an -i form (連用形{れんようけい}) of a verb seems to be a suffix rather than a prefix?
Ah so it's somewhat like an English gerund / present participle or infinitive?
Mar
31
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
I've gone ahead and asked about this in a followup question: When an -i form (連用形れんようけい) of a verb seems to be a suffix rather than a prefix?
Mar
31
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
I see from Wikipedia that 割り would be the -i form, or 連用形 ren'yōkei. But it says "The i form has many uses, typically as a prefix." But it's not a prefix here and I can't see any use in that Wikipedia that I can connect to this use either ...
Mar
31
comment Are both spellings for ふけ (fuke) “dandruff” ateji? If not what's actually going on?
@user3169: Sadly my Japanese is not approaching the level needed to read either of those, and neither is Google Translate's ability (-: I can see that the first link mentions 当て字, but I can't make out what it's saying.
Mar
31
comment What is the radical which is written by two dots on the top of a Kanji?
Well it can be a fool's errand if you expect to find a logical system, like always for etymology and spelling in natural languages. On the other hand knowing the radical can help with mnemonic memory tricks for learning characters and can help for those times when you need to use a radical index.
Mar
31
comment What is the radical which is written by two dots on the top of a Kanji?
Also worth mentioning is that there are more than 214 commonly reused elements, so some "radicals" is the loose sense are never "radicals" in the strict sense, while in some characters every element may also be used as a "radical" in the strict sense in other characters. Then there are elements which occur in few or even in a single character, it makes even less sense to think of those as "radicals".
Mar
31
comment What is the radical which is written by two dots on the top of a Kanji?
+1 for clarifying that "radical" does not refer to each element of a kanji, especially when you want to be clear.
Mar
31
comment Which is the “official” kanji for さい, 歳 or 才?
Watch out because one "sound" can be used for two words. Compare English "bow" and "bough". This is different to two ways to write a word that always has the same sound, like "draft" and "draught". Both situations are more common in Japanese than in English, and the same sound can have both multiple words and multiple spellings of the same word. This might not be the case for さい but is worth considering for questions of this type.
Mar
31
comment どうしますか vs 何をしますか
I often say to Japanese people "今日は何をしますか?" and have never been corrected. Is this actually wrong (at least foreigner Japanese)?