4,772 reputation
2280
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Kagoshima-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 6 hours ago

I'm hitchhiking around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now in Kagoshima after over a month in Okinawa.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
So を actually has a second function besides being the direct object particle? Wow!
Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
Thanks for the response, I'll have to wait for somebody kindly to offer up a translation though (-:
Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
Nobody told me. I explained how I logically reached this conclusion because を is the direct object particle and verbs that take direct objects are transitive verbs. Based of course on limited and flawed knowledge.
Apr
3
comment Cartel, syndicate, anti-competitive practice
Yes sorry I chose a poor word to describe it. I did see that your answer was in fact very good and I already upvoted it. (-:
Apr
3
comment Cartel, syndicate, anti-competitive practice
@Tim: It's extremely obvious he's asking about both. The correct way to handle it is to answer the on-topic part and inform him that the rest is off-topic. Not just to trash the entire question as off-topic.
Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
@istrasci: The tricky part is to decide if it's a word that's made out of two words or a phrase consisting in two words. That's why I included some clarifications in my question, such as whether they have entries in dictionaries. Obviously even that breaks down though for colloquial and slang words which don't get into the dictionary for other reasons.
Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
This answer would be even better if you could add a very brief description of how these normally do not conjugate normally. What's normally not normal about them? (-:
Apr
2
comment Enthusiastically accepting an offer or invitation
Ah yes I forget お願いします is not just for making requests.
Apr
2
comment Enthusiastically accepting an offer or invitation
Oh yes "by all means" is the formal equivalent to the colloquial "I'd love to". It didn't spring to mind because I personally never use it. English Wiktionary lists どうしても and きっと for "by all means".
Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
I think it's perfectly fine to answer in Japanese only if the OP asked in English but the answerer cannot answer in English. But I would certainly appreciate if somebody could edit in a translation so I can understand too and then I can also vote accordingly. (-:
Apr
2
comment Enthusiastically accepting an offer or invitation
Hello serial anonymous downvoter who never offers constructive criticism - have a great day!
Apr
2
comment Are there words which consist of katakana and hiragana letters together?
@TokyoNagoya and ash sorry しる was a typo for する. Ash, Those examples look like they count. Is that ググる "to Google"? I expected the る to also be katakana ル so could be just what I'm looking for. I'm not familiar with the other words though to be able to say either way. But I'll look them up now ...
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
Yes in English we even say "try and see".
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
Is this みる related to 見る? I recently learned that when words gain grammatical / auxiliary functions that those will be written only in hiragana.
Apr
2
comment Have you tried XYZ before?
I don't know. ~てみる didn't show up in the dictionaries I looked in or when I quizzed the Japanese around me.
Apr
2
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
No I hadn't noticed but that's just the kind of thing I love. It seems this is a very productive manner of word formation as well as a cool way to use verbs like adjectives.
Apr
2
comment Specific differences to consider between any individual katakana and hiragana?
One other time you see ー with hiragana is when typing, briefly, before the IME converts the hiragana to katakana.
Apr
2
comment Specific differences to consider between any individual katakana and hiragana?
@kinyo: Katakana used to be used for particles before the reform that happened just after the war.
Apr
2
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
Well Japanese certainly seems to be one of those tricky languages when it comes to morphosyntax and making analytical decisions about affixes and bound morphemes, etc.
Apr
1
comment Are both spellings for ふけ (fuke) “dandruff” ateji? If not what's actually going on?
Oddly the katakana is the one form that is not in WWWJDIC! This also highlights the problems of learning vocabulary from dictionaries, especially for Japanese with the various scripts increasing the number of potential spellings.