Reputation
5,892
Next tag badge:
19/100 score
2/20 answers
Badges
9 51 102
Impact
~344k people reached

May
10
comment How do native speakers “read” single-kanji signs when those kanji are not also standalone words?
Yes I've been wondering for a little while whether it's worth asking a question on the difference between 危ない and 危険 (-:
May
10
comment is 指関節{しかんせつ} a “normal” japanese word or a rare technical one?
@ZhenLin: If so then that's definitely means the answer is a mistake in Wiktionary. Click on - I made it a link.
May
9
comment Does the volitional form of a verb mean both “lets” and “I want to”?
Sorry dave I thought I deleted that comment just after I wrote it. I haven't go to the volitional yet but I saw it here a lot and made the tag myself at some point with no tag wiki. The furigana does seem to be working for me though. Try doing a forced refresh of your browser cache. That's usual CTRL + F5
May
9
comment Less-approximate and more-approximate forms of loan words
Wow this is interesting to me. It looks like we've uncovered another way in which Japanese spelling is not as phonetic as people tend to think.
May
9
comment Does the volitional form of a verb mean both “lets” and “I want to”?
You should really add a tag wiki to volitional though so that people can try to use it properly. I don't know the term well enough to do so myself.
May
8
comment Does the volitional form of a verb mean both “lets” and “I want to”?
for me volitional is an overly technical linguistic term (-:
May
8
comment ブラウザ or ブラウザー? Words borrowed from English which end with -er
The spellings just reflect the two different pronunciations. I'm adding the pronunciation tag. I wonder if this is a new trend or if it's always been this way.
May
8
comment Does -ou / -you / -mashou conjugation have a negative form?
Might make a great question for linguistics.SE though!
May
8
comment Does -ou / -you / -mashou conjugation have a negative form?
@snailboat: I thought somebody might have something to say but if you know linguistics what does "really" ever mean? It's usually all down to traditions and analyses. We lost the "real" language handbook shortly after the gods gave it to us. In many analyses of many languages "let's" is described as the 1st person plural imperative. But I don't know if any of the analyses of Japanese put it this way. I also don't know if it would be helpful/unhelpful or what would be best among: separate it into a new tag, rename the tag, or just edit the tag wiki to talk about it.
May
8
comment Are there general rules on when to use kanji vs. kana?
@virmaior: Thanks. It's now on my reading list. I can make out some things but being a beginner I can't read it properly of course. I wonder if anybody has ever made an English translation of this somewhere?
May
8
comment Is それが人生{じんせい} , 仕様{しよう}が無{な}い, or something else the most natural equivalent to “that's life”, “c'est la vie”, etc?
@virmaior: Hmm well "idiomatic" has several related senses. Here's three of Wiktionary's versions: 1 Pertaining or conforming to the mode of expression characteristic of a language. 2 Resembling or characteristic of an idiom. 3 Using many idioms. - So I would like to know if it's idiomatic by sense 1. Do people who speak idiomatic Japanese, native speakers, speak this way? If not, which of the alternatives offered in comments or the now un-deleted answer, are better, more native-sounding, for conveying the same sentiment?
May
7
comment Is それが人生{じんせい} , 仕様{しよう}が無{な}い, or something else the most natural equivalent to “that's life”, “c'est la vie”, etc?
@virmaior: I suppose it would look at least a little like the answer that Tokyo Nagoya just deleted. There's a sentiment that can be expressed many ways. Some would be literal translations from other languages that native speakers would understand but seldom use, others would be favoured by native speakers whether or not they translate literally into something speakers of other languages would use or recognize. (Idiomatic etc.)
May
5
comment What are the origins of the names of tanuki and kitsune noodle dishes?
Really? Would you like to share with us the clarity of what/why "fox udon"?
May
5
comment Is there a “right” or “best” way to write this Okinawan expression for “cheers”?
Yes my 100-year old book uses katakana but I noticed hiragana a lot more about the place. Kanji I only noticed when looking up this term.
May
5
comment On the two equivalents on maps of “you are here” (現在地{げんざいち} and 現在位置{げんざいいち})
FWIW Wiktionary has "boiled egg" and "fried egg" so is in peculiar company even with itself (-:
May
5
comment On the two equivalents on maps of “you are here” (現在地{げんざいち} and 現在位置{げんざいいち})
Oh don't worry I'm not asking you guys to back me up or make Wiktionary policy decisions. I just want to be informed. It just happens that I'm learning Japanese and contributing to Wiktionary in parallel.
May
5
comment In which terms, if any, is へつ used as an On-reading of the character 閉?
Does that rule it out as being an error in the Unicode database, or in the source that Unicode used when compiling its database? Unicode certainly hasn't proven to be free of errors otherwise.
May
5
comment Is there a general purpose equivalent for the “agent suffix” -er of English?
Ah yes I think I found this when going through vocabulary another time. I'll include it (-:
May
5
comment Are there general rules on when to use kanji vs. kana?
@virmaior: I was under the impression that the Joyo is only a list of "regular use Chinese characters" with no other information on how they may be combined, when to use kana instead etc. But I'm happy to be shown to be wrong.
May
4
comment Intuitive or logical way to know when to use a kanji spelling vs hiragana spelling?
@user3169: "I hate getting blisters". Anyway at first I expected that it was the same word as "bean" used in a figurative sense, just like Spanish uses "grano" for "pimple", though it's the same word for "grain"? Or maybe you're saying that Japanese is unique in lacking figurative senses. Or maybe you're saying that it's trivially easy to be able to tell the difference between figurative senses and homonyms in all cases in Japanese? ...