5,149 reputation
23193
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Tamarama, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 17 at 7:20

I've just finished a 9.5 month hitchhiking trip around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now back home between trips.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Mar
11
comment How to understand “きざみ角煮{かくに}”
@DariusJahandarie: Stack Exchange likes us to show that we tried to find answers before asking here. My experience is different to yours, I find it often gives helpful translations for very short inputs. But for a 5-character input this was not just inaccurate but terrible. To somebody with as little knowledge of Japanese as me I took this as a hint that it might not be the most straightforward 5 characters to translate for whatever reason.
Mar
11
comment Is it true that all verbs have a corresponding noun form?
So if I follow this correctly, 食べ is the 連用形 of 食べる, but it is not used as a noun. What uses then does 食べ have?
Mar
11
comment How to understand “きざみ角煮{かくに}”
Exemplary answer! どうもありがとうございます!
Mar
11
comment How to understand “きざみ角煮{かくに}”
@Earthliŋ: I think I have to properly learn this before I should go about writing up answers. After creating the new renyōkei tag I see there are lots of questions on the topic, so I guess there's a fair bit to understand and I'm not alone (-: I'll certainly upvote and accept a good answer that makes the process in this instance nice and clear.
Mar
11
comment How to parse “あけぐち”?
Ah yes, pictures of words.
Mar
11
comment How to understand “きざみ角煮{かくに}”
@TokyoNagoya: Yes I was just coming to the same conclusion! It looks like I have to find a way to study this ~む → ~み thing. There seem to be many Japanese terms for "mince(d)" as adjective, noun, or verb. In dictionaries I've only found this as きざむ now that I know what to look for.
Mar
10
comment Would I have 牛乳 or ミルク with my cereal?
It's somewhat surprising that milk had to come to Japan from the west considering the ancient connections between Mongol and Japanese culture. Mongolians traditionally live on milk and many kinds of dairy foods for much of the year, and the milk of several different animals is utilized. (Written before I read all the way down to Dave M G's comment.)
Mar
10
comment Is “琉語解釋” Japanese?
@blutorange: Then again it could be a kyujitai/shinjitai pair that just isn't marked as such in the English Wiktionary. I'm still researching this (-: ... OK they are a kyujitai/shinjitai pair and are listed in the Wikipedia article.
Mar
10
comment Is “琉語解釋” Japanese?
@blutorange: If you submit an answer explaining the how and why of 釋=釈 I will upvote and accept it! I'm guessing they are not a kyujitai/shinjitai pair but rather a case of a deprecated character being replaced by a more common character with similar shape and reading. I've come across this before but couldn't find a name for the phenomenon.
Mar
10
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
The further into variant characters you get, the more different kinds you find. Chinese and Japanese simplifications with separate characters in Unicode, characters that Unicode regards as the same but are correctly drawn differently in different fonts/locales, of which some have the same and some have a different number of strokes. Variants which are not standard Chinese or Japanese simplifications, some of which are used mainly in names, again they may or may not share a Unicode character, and then there are "Z variants", which have two Unicode characters with identical appearance. And more!
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
Check this Google search showing just as many sites saying this has 15 strokes as web sites saying it has 16 strokes! google.com/…
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
I found a webpage where this stroke is counted as stroke 12, so that rules out my pet idea that it could be a mistake in the font: jiten.go-kanken.com/kanjie/2070.html
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
I'm pretty sure Gulim is a Korean font. Korean hanja generally uses Traditional Chinese forms. I wonder if there's a website that will show you the same character in as many fonts as possible ...
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
Ah yes. Interesting because it looks like it should change the stroke count for the character.
Mar
9
comment How to parse “あけぐち”?
There's actually two common English terms: conjunctive form as mentioned, but also continuative form.
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
Both Gothic and Mincho are Japanese fonts though, so the first two points won't apply. For the third point, Unicode regards them as separate characters whereas the OP seems to be asking about the same character in two different but specifically Japanese fonts \-:
Mar
9
comment Meaning of font variation in the case of the character 賭
What kind of extra stroke? A picture is worth a thousand words.
Mar
9
comment Is there a special word in Okinawa for “cheers” / “乾杯{かんぱい}”?
It also has a nice little entry in "JLECT" which tells you what Japanese words it's related to.
Mar
9
comment How to parse “あけぐち”?
It doesn't surprise me, but I guess I'm getting to a level of analysing things into their parts, a stage I always get to when learning languages. I don't know if everybody else goes through this stage? Running Google Translate over the Japanese Wikipedia article for "連用形" tells me it's called the "conjunctive form" in English - and this term indeed sounds familiar. For me the rendaku is the easy part even if I don't always remembering when typing. Other English terms for processes like this in many languages are "assimilation" and "sandhi".
Mar
9
comment How to parse “あけぐち”?
Good point! I didn't think of that. Then of course I never stopped to analyse how those are formed either. But I would think they are both accepted as words in their own right these days.