4,770 reputation
2280
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Kagoshima-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

I'm hitchhiking around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now in Kagoshima after over a month in Okinawa.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Oct
18
comment Translation of “に” into “natural” English
@Axioplase: Sorry to nitpick but "to conjugate" cannot be used with adjectives in English but only verbs. "To decline" can be used with nouns and adjectives for languages with case. But English doesn't have case (anymore). The generic word for all kinds of grammatical changes of endings of words is "to inflect". In fact "stinkier" is called the "comparative form" of the adjective "stinky".
Oct
18
comment Translation of “に” into “natural” English
You're making a false assumption that any adverb in language A (Japanese in this case) must map 1:1 to an adjective + "ly" in language B (English in this case). It's not a matter of whether it translates but of how you translate it idiomatically. For instance in German you can indeed use the equivalent of -ly adverbs with the equivalent of "to be". But neither what English does nor what German does dictates what japanese may do. You mention "natural" translation but you're complaining about "literal" translation.
Sep
26
comment Is Japanese that lacks proofreading likely to contain bad spelling or grammar?
@Andrew: Sorry if you're alot was deliberate and didnt wont it spelt write.
Sep
25
comment Is Japanese that lacks proofreading likely to contain bad spelling or grammar?
Well yes misconversion would be one way to arrive at a misspelling, but I have Japanese friends who do exactly the same mistake when writing with a pen! Sometimes words that sound the same have similar but different meanings and similar but different characters. But you're right I did miss the part where OP says they're only reading the kana sorry )-:
Sep
24
comment Is Japanese that lacks proofreading likely to contain bad spelling or grammar?
Misspelling means using any wrong character, not just wrong kana. Unless you want to invent new words for different kinds of Japanese misspelling (-:
Sep
20
comment How to choose between “よん” (yon) vs “し” (shi) for “四” (4) and “しち” (shichi) vs “なな” (nana) for “七” (7)?
@Andrew: Could you clarify what you're trying to say by comparing the votes on TsuyoshiIto's comment and Ken's question? I can't see that they disagree but maybe I'm missing something.
Sep
14
comment Does the particle “を” (wo) have a special use when at the end of a sentence?
@sawa: Oh that's a typo for "particle" and I can't believe it's been there so long without being spotted! Thanks.
Sep
12
comment Why are the particles “は” (ha⇒wa), “へ” (he⇒e), and “を” (wo⇒o) not spelled phonetically?
@sawa: Yes I've had people insist it's "wo" and people insist it's "o" so I just assumed it varied from either place to place or person to person. Or they just aren't aware of phonological rules (-:
Sep
11
comment Are the usage of 上 and 下 as labels only limited to items that come in pairs of two?
As well as trilogies, Japanese novels are very often, possibly typically, published in parts. For instance, Haruki Murakami's works were mostly published one part or two parts but ねじまき鳥クロニクル (The Wind-up Bird Chronicle) was published in three parts and was my first Japanese book with 上, 中, and 下.
Sep
4
comment Is there any gairaigo based on Australian English?
I can't think of any Australian words in Japanese except of course animal names and place names. (I'm Australian and have been to Japan numerous times)
Aug
31
comment Are all kanji compounds considered words?
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/descriptivism
Aug
27
comment Wait… えらい means also means “terrible”?
@Dave: I think it's a perfect place to start from and end up in as "えらい" could be seen as a particularly good translation for "terrific" or "awesome" in this light in certain contexts because it might capture even the ambiguity, self-opposite, and/or old-fashionedness. And if not then establishing so is also an interesting and valuable use of these comments.
Aug
27
comment Is「ふむふむ」still used nowadays?
In other posts I have referred to such things as "vocal noises" but I bet there's an actual term for them too.
Aug
27
comment Wait… えらい means also means “terrible”?
@Dave: I think it's for Ignacio and yourself who already brought it up and anybody else reading this question and making similar comparisons. You can't compare Japanese usage to English usage without saying anything about the English usage.
Aug
27
comment Wait… えらい means also means “terrible”?
"Terrific" and "awesome" are only exclusively positive in colloquial speech. You will occasionally come across them with their original meanings in sober writing in some contexts and much more commonly in older material, even the age of Tintin.
Aug
23
comment Japanese kanji with different meanings in Chinese
@Dave M G: I think the Chinese character question conforms exactly the goal of understanding Japanese. But your comment may make a very good argument for the "Languages" proposal in Area 51.
Aug
22
comment Japanese kanji with different meanings in Chinese
Who says we can only learn Japanese and no other language, or completely isolate the learning of different languages. I'm learning Japanese and Korean (much less seriously than most of you) and due to some shared heritage and very similar grammars which are both very dissimilar to English it helps very much to be able to compare the two. I don't have enough Japanese or Korean to discuss the languages in anything other than English however.
Aug
15
comment Modern names of the obsolete kana ゑ and ゐ
And it's now a great answer - thanks! - I thought I'd seen in a Wikipedia article that these kana could be found on signs here and there and wanted to spot some while I was in Japan but I didn't catch any.
Aug
9
comment Term for multiple foreign words sharing the same loanword in Japanese?
Well フォーク (fork) and フォーク (folk) are also homographs since they are also written the same (unlike say "bow" and "bough" in English). So in this case I would use homonym which covers either and both.
Aug
8
comment Is the word ハーフ derogatory?
@Mechanical snail: Indeed. I can't recall in which context I heard or read it. More likely in an online discussion of hybrid vigour making an analogy I think...