4,842 reputation
2280
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Kagoshima-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 3 hours ago

I'm hitchhiking around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now in Kagoshima after over a month in Okinawa.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Feb
28
comment できる vs ~えます form for “can”, “able to”
@dainichi: Is it that できる has to be used in combination with ことが? I've spotted this in constructions in this and the previous question but I never learned that so don't know how to understand it.
Feb
28
comment できる vs ~えます form for “can”, “able to”
I'm such a beginner, even though I kind of know a few things, that it's really hard for me to spot duplicates. I didn't even know if the potential form tag really belonged here. By the way, I think I said "読んで出来ます" (I can read it).
Feb
27
comment Are “ピーナッツ” and “ピーナツ” both correct for “peanut(s)”?
@Earthliŋ: Thanks for the heads-up. I've been gone for a long time.
Feb
27
comment Are “ピーナッツ” and “ピーナツ” both correct for “peanut(s)”?
Just a casual drive-by downvote? Or is there some constructive criticism coming along later when you have the energy?
Feb
25
comment Pronouncing が as 'nga'
@jpierson: In API "j" has the sound it has in some languages such as Dutch and German, namely it sounds like English "y". IPA uses "y" for a vowel sound not found in English. So basically IPA /nja/ would sound like English "nya" or "nyah".
Feb
25
comment How to say “no thank you, I don't want / need it”?
If "いいです" is a more correct answer for my indicated situations than whatever's answer then please write it up and submit it and I will vote it up.
Feb
25
comment How to say “no thank you, I don't want / need it”?
Does "kekkou desu" also work for my examples of plastic bag, drinking straw, disposable chopsticks, etc?
Oct
6
comment Is the word ハーフ derogatory?
Related article: In Japan, Will Hafu Ever Be Considered Whole?
Jan
9
comment Is “豪斯多拉利” an ateji way to write “Australia”?
Yes I tried to mention that is the current (post spelling reform) character used in compounds like "Japan-Australia relations". Thanks for the new link. I wonder if all the variants also occurred in Chinese. In fact usually only 澳大利亞/澳大利亚 is seen (and 澳洲).
Aug
30
comment Onigiri and nigiri
Also "ball" is kinda historic. Traditionally onigri were hand made and spherical. These days many are factory made and one very common kind is triangular. There can be many fillings other than meat or fish and they are not always wrapped in seaweed. Oh and I ❤ them.
Jul
30
comment How many forms can a Japanese verb take?
This seems to apply that in Japanese there are no restrictions on which auxiliaries or affixes can be used together, which would be surprising when compared to other languages with agglutinative verb morphology such as Georgian.
Jul
29
comment How many forms can a Japanese verb take?
@sawa: Hmm if you wouldn't use the term "verb form" to describe the result of adding a grammatical combination of such affixes to such an invariant verb root, which term would you suggest?
Jul
29
comment How many forms can a Japanese verb take?
@sawa: Can you please explain? Are you saying that Japanese verbs don't inflect to make different forms but instead only come in one root form and are followed by other small words to create past, negative, differing politeness, etc??
Jul
29
comment How many forms can a Japanese verb take?
@ZhenLin: For you it might not matter. For somebody writing software for a morphological analyser, a conjugator, or writing a book such as "501 Japanese verbs in every conjugation" it can matter a lot. In my case it's just an interesting factoid since I have seen people work out how many forms a verb can take in other morphologically complex languages such as Georgian and Arabic.
May
29
comment What are other language equivalents to Japanese particles?
Actually maps better to the instrumental case in languages which have one than it does to English. Languages which rely only on adpositions generally have greater variety in usage as compared to languages with case systems. For instance in the language I'm currently studying, Georgian, does map to the instrumental case ending -ით for both examples you give.
Apr
12
comment Are there any old loanwords from Korean, especially any not written in katakana?
Is this the word written as kanji , kana つか? In modern Korean ? Can you provide a reference as to its Korean origin? I couldn't find one so far by googling...
Dec
20
comment Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
The answer will certainly be "it depends" (-:
Dec
12
comment Are kanji characters made up of radicals only or could they contain strokes that are not radicals?
You do clear it up afterwards but for the TL;DR people since you do provide a summary answer it would be better if it wasn't ambiguous. It will just make it a better answer for the future (I already voted you up!)
Dec
12
comment Are kanji characters made up of radicals only or could they contain strokes that are not radicals?
Sorry @heefske: I was just repeating the exact text of the OP's question which doesn't include this "all" but which does offer two options which it's difficult to assign your single "no" to.
Dec
9
comment Are kanji characters made up of radicals only or could they contain strokes that are not radicals?
Does your "short answer no" mean 1. "No - kanji characters are not made up of radicals only" or 2. "No - they could not contain strokes that are not radicals"?