5,164 reputation
33293
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Tamarama, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Nov 19 at 15:12

I've just finished a 9.5 month hitchhiking trip around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now back home between trips.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Mar
25
comment Usual term for the topic of foreigners learning Japanese?
I haven't heard "JSL" before actually. If there is a single standard or usual way, that's what I want. If, like in English, there's more than one way then I suppose a longer answer might be warranted. I'll start with 日本語教育 as you suggest though.
Mar
25
comment Can 交番 (koban) be used for old British-style/Dr Who police boxes?
Yes I also got a number of hits just by searching for "交番 tardis", so at least some people associate the two concepts.
Mar
25
comment Can 交番 (koban) be used for old British-style/Dr Who police boxes?
The English version of the Wikipedia article on kobans does offer us a little of their history. It seems they were originally much smaller until 1881. Unfortunately there's no Japanese version of the Wikipedia Police box article.
Mar
25
comment Can 交番 (koban) be used for old British-style/Dr Who police boxes?
But have 交番 always been "more like a mini-police station manned 24/7"? Or is this just their modern manifestation? Dr Who's police box isn't modern either, and doesn't even have a modern manifestation. But this doesn't mean that in the past they weren't more similar. I for one don't know either way but find this question interesting (-:
Mar
25
comment What´s the (entire) direct object in this sentence?
Yes even "stab into" sounds at least unnatural but it's a bit harder to call than "stab in".
Mar
24
comment What´s the (entire) direct object in this sentence?
Just a minor point that "stab a dagger in someone's hand" is not grammatical English. It literally means somebody is holding a knife and you stab that knife with your knife. You probably want to say "stab a dagger into someone's hand".
Mar
24
comment What does 私たち imply?
In many languages there is a distinction between "inclusive" and "exclusive" pronouns. The former means "me and you (and maybe others too)" and the latter means "me and others but not you". Neither English nor Japanese has this distinction though. Then of course ~たち is pretty special and is something like a noun meaning "and others". Japanese pronouns are actually very different from pronouns in most languages (other than Korean and Okinawan) for this and other reasons.
Mar
24
comment Is を used in real Japanese?
Also "start simplifying and breaking linguistic rules" is definitely wrong. To speak casual, everyday Japanese you have to know more rules, you don't just drop all particles without rhyme or reason, you have to know which can be dropped under which conditions, following linguistic rules. Any linguist will tell you so. Learning textbook Japanese is easier because it's in so many textbooks and is never wrong. It's harder because the normal people you're likely to meet don't talk like that and you can only learn by experience since textbooks don't cover casual, everyday Japanese well.
Mar
24
comment Is を used in real Japanese?
This is a good answer, but I don't believe the logic in your final paragraph really follows. It would make just as much sense to say "That said, you should understand casual, everyday Japanese before you start learning complex formal and keigo rules. You might end up in a situation where you don't know casual, everyday Japanese when that is required."
Mar
24
comment Are there native Japanese numbers greater than 10? What use are they?
ほ (which, due to the 1946 simplifications, would be pronounced as お) - They simplified pronunciations too? I thought they only simplified orthography (kanji and kana use).
Mar
24
comment Difference between って and は as topic marker
Reading this answer gives me the impression that って functions more like the subject particle が than the topic particle は - would that be correct though?
Mar
21
comment On the replacing of kanji made obsolete in the 1946 reforms with similar-looking kanji.
This is the answer I've been waiting for for so long! I've changed to this as the accepted answer since it has more detailed and specific information I wasn't able to uncover before even with the previous accepted answer.
Mar
18
comment Is “琉語解釋” Japanese?
@Kaji: Yes simplification is something that's existed forever in both Chinese and Japanese. When the languages had their reforms some of the long used simplified variants became the new standard character and others were invented as part of each reform. But other simplifications were always used and invented and popularised before during and after each reform. Some have appeared in Unicode or some fonts. And thanks for the link! (-:
Mar
17
comment does anyone know of any o-words or go-words which are absolutely neutral?
For anybody reading these comments and interested in the process mentioned by sawa, you can get an introduction from reading the Wikipedia article on lexicalization.
Mar
14
comment Do Japanese's sister languages have equivalents of the particles は and を?
Yes I got a glimpse of the ga/no stuff in secondhand bookshop in Ginowan today, which is where I didn't spot the other particles. Sadly the book was outside my price range or I would've loved to buy it. Anyway the ga/no stuff looked too interesting to lump in here - it probably deserves at least one question of its own (-:
Mar
13
comment “Seemingly cute” - かわいい + 〜そう
Does this mean that blind and visually people never use ~そう or that they shouldn't use it?
Mar
13
comment “Seemingly cute” - かわいい + 〜そう
@EnnoShioji: Out of interest, if it never means "seems cute", what mistake do you make? Somebody says "pitiful" and you at first hear "seems cute", or you actually sometimes say "seems cute" before realizing people will hear "pitiful"?
Mar
12
comment In Okinawan, what is the ン in ウチナーンチュ?
@ZhenLin: I suppose it could seem like assimilation, which is what rendaku is an example of. But what makes it different is that in assimilation, properties of one or both sounds influence each other at a point of contact. Whereas epenthesis adds a new sound. Both are for reasons of prosodics though. These examples show that the first component can change but the n comes with the チュ
Mar
12
comment Etymology of “よう” in “豆腐{とうふ}よう”
@TokyoNagoya: "豆腐糕" might just mean "tofu pudding" in Chinese, so it could even be a coincidence.
Mar
12
comment Etymology of “よう” in “豆腐{とうふ}よう”
@TokyoNagoya: I'm interested in the whole history of the term. I started by wondering what "yo" meant but I'm curious about etymology and food so began to wonder where it came from. I was thinking Okinawan until your comment. It's not yet proof though. It could still be from Okinawan and the "餻" is an ateji chosen under influence from the Chinese term or that the dish spread from Okinawa to China. I found a history of fermented tofu on the Internet but as I'm a slow reader and doing many things at once I haven't got through it yet ...