4,772 reputation
2280
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Kagoshima-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 mins ago

I'm hitchhiking around Asia, learning bits of the languages on the road as needed.

I'm now in Kagoshima after over a month in Okinawa.

召し上がり方
今、売れています
毎日得だ値
超目玉品


Apr
4
revised Again question about modifying nouns
edited tags
Apr
4
comment ~った with a noun (生い立ち > 生い立った) - what's really going on?
Thanks. I'm not trying to figure out the author&translator's motives but understand the grammar process with these renyokei compounds that bilingual dictionaries state are nouns, but are not really.
Apr
4
asked ~った with a noun (生い立ち > 生い立った) - what's really going on?
Apr
4
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
Yes it's possible to read @Tim's comment as "Why? What's your use case for writing a word in kanji that's usually written in hiragana?" But to me the natural way to read it was "Why? It's already annoying how much beginners use kanji for words normally written in hiragana and you just want to make that worse". Questioning people's motives is decreasing the signal to noise ratio. Even if the OP wanted start a grass roots spelling revolution to bring back neglected kanji that's not our concern. 在りません is right, 有りません is wrong, and the OP already makes it clear they know ありません is the normal way.
Apr
4
comment How to read this kanji? (see image)
You want to read it or you want to know its stroke count? The top element is four strokes and means "stop". The bottom element is four strokes and means "few". As you learn more characters you lot to spot common elements, which helps you know what's one long stroke and what's two short strokes, which helps you work out the stroke count.
Apr
4
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
I don't think this answer is in the spirit very clearly expressed by the OP by saying "curious about a bit of academic pedantry of trivial importance". Learners over-using kanji. Teachers over-answering curiosity...
Apr
4
comment kanji 有る, usage in the negative be verb
Why? Why be determined to write it in Kanji? Is that rhetorical? I think this is a good answer. It says it's not normally written in kanji but on the rare occasions when it is you want to recognize it. Maybe you're determined to write in a mock foreigner kanji-overusing style. Maybe you're determined to write in an old-fashioned style from before writing in hiragana became the norm. Maybe you're curious about a bit of academic pedantry of trivial importance. Who cares why somebody would want to learn a rare usage as long as we teach them how to do it right.
Apr
4
comment Is there a kanji for しか?
@paullb: Don't worry, you're not ignorant. Many features of the English Wiktionary are extremely well hidden. I only know some things about it because I've been a contributor since 2002 and was formerly very deeply involved. en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
Apr
4
comment Is there a kanji for しか?
I've submitted etymology requests for both words in the English Wiktionary. I've made a new manyogana tag too and added it here and to a few previous applicable questions. I find this pretty interesting myself.
Apr
4
revised Was the の particle sometimes written in katakana?
edited tags
Apr
4
revised Was “乎” the manyogana spelling of the accusative/object particle “を”?
edited tags
Apr
4
revised Pre-Kana Kanji readings
edited tags; fmt
Apr
4
revised Is there a kanji for しか?
edited tags
Apr
4
revised Use of から vs を with 出て行く?:
edited tags
Apr
3
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
Perhaps you should share with us "the" definition of "transitive".
Apr
3
revised Use of から vs を with 出て行く?:
consistent use of fullwidth and normal width spaces and punctuation
Apr
3
comment Explain how 向{む}く “to face” can take “上{うえ}” as a direct object using を?
@Tim: I agree, I attempted to allow for either outcome as the answer when I asked, but I went with the naive language learner terminology too, because that's how we're taught to understand it. I think this all underlies the problems of learning without a teacher or at least without a directed course taking you from a first approximation toward better and fuller understanding.
Apr
3
comment Making sense of transitive usage of 行く and 来る - 「を行く」 and 「を来る」
@sawa: I wouldn't characterize that as transitive use of "to die". Definitely not semantically and quite possible not syntactically either. My native speaker intuition is that it's some quirky kind of adverbial modifier.
Apr
3
comment Repetitive words (e.g. どんどん, ぺらぺら, いらいら…)
Snailboat gives you the term for this kind of phonological / word-formation process. Istrasci gives you the two terms for the classes of words that use this process in Japanese.