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location 東京
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

Lived in Japan for longer than I'd like to admit, given that my Japanese isn't where it should be given the time here.

I'm strongest in reading, and weakest in speaking. I can never express my thoughts accurately enough or fast enough.

I also have a lot of bad habits when it comes to grammar, having gone for so long without proper study. Japanese is not a language learned by osmosis. I'm hoping to stamp those quirks out by asking questions here.


1d
comment Is this seat being chased, or is the person in it being chased from it?
@istrasci, I put an explanation on JLU Meta.
1d
comment This mother doesn't know her own child?
@virmaior, I agree with ssb, the more the merrier. I'm glad to have different approaches to the same conclusion. The only difficulty is deciding which one to mark correct. It's a good problem to have.
1d
comment Is this seat being chased, or is the person in it being chased from it?
The SAD strikes again.
Mar
27
comment is ~だ~だ another way of listing things, or does my JLPT book have a typo?
Been in Tokyo a long, long time, but I swear, I really don't recall encountering the Noun + だ + Noun + だと form. Though, I've had this happen before where I've lived in blissful ignorance of some term or phrase for a long time, and then once I know it exists, it will then seem like I hear it all the time. :) Also, you're right, the example in the book is 就職したらしたで. I had simply mistyped when copying from the book, so I'll correct the question.
Mar
25
comment What exactly does the grammatical form NがNなだけに mean?
I did not catch at all the context that the problem with the time in the first example was that it was too late at night. Now that you've pointed it out, the whole of the example makes total sense. Also, your wording for the English explanation is much clearer than the book's. I think I get it now.
Mar
25
comment What exactly does the grammatical form NがNなだけに mean?
@dainichi, thanks for that. Your explanation makes the examples much clearer. Want to upgrade your comment to an answer?
Feb
25
comment What are those 踊り字, their usage, and examples
Thanks for coming to JLU. We're happy to try and help you understand Japanese, but I'm afraid that your question is very broad. Too broad to really answer in any meaningful way. If you can specify exactly what it is you want to know, as opposed to just wanting to know "more", then you're likely to get good answer. Thanks.
Feb
25
comment Does this Japanese sentence sound right?
Is あてもなく really "anywhere", though? My dictionary lists it as "aimless, randomly". I'm not sure that's the same nuance as "anywhere". Saying she's going aimlessly means she doesn't care where she ends up, whereas in the song she wants to end up somewhere better than her home town. Anwyhere will do, but it has to at least meet that criteria, so it can't be entirely random. Unless あてもなく has a broader nuance than what the dictionary is telling me?
Feb
25
comment Does this Japanese sentence sound right?
I'm not sure why this is getting downvotes (recently there seem to be some very aggressive downvoters on JLU). 夜行列車 seems like a very good translation of "midnight train". If there's something wrong grammatically with this sentence, I would certainly like to know what it is, and if someone could explain, that would be much more helpful than just downvoting.
Feb
25
comment Does this Japanese sentence sound right?
@Ash, I hope you're aware that I was being ironic. The implications in the original English lyrics of a "midnight" train is clearly that the woman is beginning a journey, to escape her small town. By saying 終電, or "last train", it would make the song sound like it's just her going home after work. That's why I said it makes the song "mundane", which I thought would be kind of funny. Being serious, Nicolas's use of 夜中にどこかへの電車 is in keeping with the song's intent, not 終電.
Feb
24
comment Does this Japanese sentence sound right?
+1 for 終電, which I think makes the premise of the song delightfully mundane.
Feb
22
comment meaning of particle と in ためにと用意した
This question would be perfect without the commentary on Japanese learners.
Feb
22
comment What makes 飯場 sensitive?
"Enforced" is perhaps too strong. It's more just by virtue of the interface and the community, English is the lingua franca for talking about Japanese. Note that the question you are answering is stated in English. It's arguable that if someone had enough Japanese ability to understand the text you cite, they probably wouldn't need this site. Also, there are other users of JLU who are earlier in learning that would benefit. As for sensitivity, it's commendable that you are concerned, but I think we're all adults here and can deal with difficult topics objectively.
Feb
21
comment What makes 飯場 sensitive?
This answer would be greatly improved by providing an English explanation of the content of the quoted text.
Feb
17
comment Use of と in this sentence
Downvoted, and yet no one has the courage to explain why.
Feb
13
comment Use of と in this sentence
And how is "and then" different from saying "when"?
Feb
8
comment What's the deal with/origin of the character 曰?
@Eric, thanks for alerting me to that. I've swapped out the dead URL for the ones you suggest.
Jan
21
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
This came up before, and although the question here is not a duplicate, you might want to see the comments on this question.
Jan
15
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, I feel I engaged you to address your legitimate concerns about factual accuracy, but I'm very sorry to say that the comment "helpful to yourself" comes across as a need to win an argument. Obviously, I put it as an answer because I feel it's helpful to others as well, and just because it's not the angle you would take doesn't mean it's not what others might benefit from. In the future, let's please just keep comments limited to trying to collaborate on the most accurate information possible, and leave it to individuals to decide what they find "useful" or not.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, could you elaborate on why "do" is a bad parallel for する? In my dictionary, "to do", is the first definition for する.