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location 東京
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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 15 at 4:34

Jul
29
accepted What are the origins of ド when used as emphasis, and is it always negative?
Jul
29
awarded  Enthusiast
Jul
29
comment What is the らせ form of a verb?
@sawa: Agreed that language hacker needs to be more careful to post relevant questions. However, with much respect and appreciation for the fact that you are helping generate traffic and helpful answers on the site, you could do a lot to stop language hacker from posting irrelevant tweets by not rushing to answer every time he posts. You seem to try to answer no matter what the quality of his question, and the presence of your answer gives more validity than it deserves. This question should have been ignored. Please consider that always responding might encourage more poor questions.
Jul
29
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
29
comment Difference between ◯◯を掃除 and ◯◯に掃除
@language hacker: Rushing to accept an answer so as to protect a question is indicative of a complete misuse of the site and a misunderstanding of its purpose. Any question that requires such behaviour is clearly flawed, as any normal question should be able to sit indefinitely until the right answer comes along.
Jul
28
asked What are the origins of ド when used as emphasis, and is it always negative?
Jul
28
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@hippietrail: Thanks for that link. Very enjoyable. I'm a fan of Pinker, having read many of his books, which is why I believe that swearing is connected to some fundamental brain processes, and why I don't believe all Japanese cursing is purely contextual. Amanda made clear at least one, and I can think of at least one other. Still, something is still not sitting right with me about how cursing is handled in Japanese. Right now, I'm thinking that where the strangeness is has something to do with the question of why Japanese culture is believed to not have them, both from outside and within.
Jul
28
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
I gave this answer the check over rintaun's because while it didn't quite hit all the points I hoped to address, it was at least concrete about answering some. I'm still a little fuzzy about some aspect of the place of curse words in Japanese, but after much consideration, I'm not sure I'm asking the right questions. I know I don't get something, but I don't know what.
Jul
28
accepted Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
Jul
26
comment What does 男前 mean when used to describe a woman?
Just as an aside, when I think of "a handsome woman", I think of someone like Sigourney Weaver. And that was before I looked at the link provided and saw that, apparently, I'm not alone in that.
Jul
26
answered What does 男前 mean when used to describe a woman?
Jul
26
revised Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Typo corrected.
Jul
26
comment Can't に always replace へ?
+1 for technically finding a situation where へ can not be replaced by に, but I think you already knew that it wasn't quite in the spirit of the question.
Jul
26
accepted Can't に always replace へ?
Jul
25
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
24
asked Can't に always replace へ?
Jul
23
answered How can I research how a film quote was translated into Japanese?
Jul
23
asked Is there an online list of frequently used words in the news?
Jul
23
accepted Why does そう in 「美味しいそう」 not mean “seem” the way I think it should?
Jul
23
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
Yes, I think that might fit the bill. I think this is potential evidence that Japanese does in fact have words that reliably create a context of extremes, and not merely follow contexts. Thus, at least on one of the points I'm addressing, that the Japanese claim, "we don't have those," can be countered with, "well, you have at least one."