9,969 reputation
21984
bio website
location 東京
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 8 hours ago

Lived in Japan for longer than I'd like to admit, given that my Japanese isn't where it should be given the time here.

I'm strongest in reading, and weakest in speaking. I can never express my thoughts accurately enough or fast enough.

I also have a lot of bad habits when it comes to grammar, having gone for so long without proper study. Japanese is not a language learned by osmosis. I'm hoping to stamp those quirks out by asking questions here.


Jul
29
comment Difference between ◯◯を掃除 and ◯◯に掃除
@language hacker: Rushing to accept an answer so as to protect a question is indicative of a complete misuse of the site and a misunderstanding of its purpose. Any question that requires such behaviour is clearly flawed, as any normal question should be able to sit indefinitely until the right answer comes along.
Jul
28
asked What are the origins of ド when used as emphasis, and is it always negative?
Jul
28
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@hippietrail: Thanks for that link. Very enjoyable. I'm a fan of Pinker, having read many of his books, which is why I believe that swearing is connected to some fundamental brain processes, and why I don't believe all Japanese cursing is purely contextual. Amanda made clear at least one, and I can think of at least one other. Still, something is still not sitting right with me about how cursing is handled in Japanese. Right now, I'm thinking that where the strangeness is has something to do with the question of why Japanese culture is believed to not have them, both from outside and within.
Jul
28
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
I gave this answer the check over rintaun's because while it didn't quite hit all the points I hoped to address, it was at least concrete about answering some. I'm still a little fuzzy about some aspect of the place of curse words in Japanese, but after much consideration, I'm not sure I'm asking the right questions. I know I don't get something, but I don't know what.
Jul
28
accepted Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
Jul
26
comment What does 男前 mean when used to describe a woman?
Just as an aside, when I think of "a handsome woman", I think of someone like Sigourney Weaver. And that was before I looked at the link provided and saw that, apparently, I'm not alone in that.
Jul
26
answered What does 男前 mean when used to describe a woman?
Jul
26
revised Where's the missing い in ありがた迷惑【ありがた めいわく】?
Typo corrected.
Jul
26
comment Can't に always replace へ?
+1 for technically finding a situation where へ can not be replaced by に, but I think you already knew that it wasn't quite in the spirit of the question.
Jul
26
accepted Can't に always replace へ?
Jul
25
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
24
asked Can't に always replace へ?
Jul
23
answered How can I research how a film quote was translated into Japanese?
Jul
23
asked Is there an online list of frequently used words in the news?
Jul
23
accepted Why does そう in 「美味しいそう」 not mean “seem” the way I think it should?
Jul
23
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
Yes, I think that might fit the bill. I think this is potential evidence that Japanese does in fact have words that reliably create a context of extremes, and not merely follow contexts. Thus, at least on one of the points I'm addressing, that the Japanese claim, "we don't have those," can be countered with, "well, you have at least one."
Jul
22
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@Derek, rintaun: This seems to be going way off track. I don't see the importance of determining which words are curse words, or why. Yes, sure, they are culturally determined. Fine. Now that they are though, what are their implications and how are they used? That's what the original question is getting at. It seems rintaun's answer and this discussion is all about trying to establish that all swear words across all cultures are etheral except for context. I know that's patently untrue in English (fuck is a swear word, period), and I want to know how it works in Japanese.
Jul
22
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@Derek: Sorry to go a bit at length with a second comment, but I felt it necessary to add that I'm not saying swear words are now carved in stone, never to change. Just that while some words are buffeted by culture and come and go out of favour, other words are like boulders in a stream that are much harder to shift. A little web searching indicates the word "shit" (including variant spellings) is many hundreds of years old.
Jul
22
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@Derek: No argument that which words fill the role of swear words is arbitrary. But I believe that there is a desire, if not a need, in a culture to have a way of expressing extremes. So some words will get chosen to fill that role. Which words and why isn't as important as the fact that the category of extreme words does exist, regardless of how it gets made. The idea of rintaun's that I don't accept is that the words are always made bad by context and nothing else. In English, now that the words are delineated, however that happened, they no longer require context to be understood.
Jul
22
revised What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
Corrected "it's" to "its"