10,024 reputation
21984
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location 東京
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

Lived in Japan for longer than I'd like to admit, given that my Japanese isn't where it should be given the time here.

I'm strongest in reading, and weakest in speaking. I can never express my thoughts accurately enough or fast enough.

I also have a lot of bad habits when it comes to grammar, having gone for so long without proper study. Japanese is not a language learned by osmosis. I'm hoping to stamp those quirks out by asking questions here.


Aug
13
revised なった versus なってきた
Corrected typo.
Aug
13
asked なった versus なってきた
Aug
12
accepted Are foreign adjectives always な adjectives?
Aug
11
comment 「安い」って英語からきた表現?
うん、でも翻訳したら、違いが明解になると思う。英語で"You're cheap"と日本語で「安いな」の意味はかなり違う。僕にとって、"You're cheap"はすごく侮辱的な。
Aug
11
answered 「安い」って英語からきた表現?
Aug
10
comment What Does 火信 Mean?
@Tsuyoshi Ito: Sorry if I am misunderstanding what you are trying to convey, but it just seems you're trying to deny the flexibility of the language.
Aug
10
comment What Does 火信 Mean?
@Tsuyoshi Ito: You are talking about "correct" words. The conversation is about new words. Also, the intended meaning is not "belief in fire", that was just one of the suggestions that a Japanese person guessed.
Aug
10
comment What Does 火信 Mean?
@Kobi: "Abiding" is not one of the meanings associated with either kanji, so no Japanese would assume or guess that definition. You would most likely have to explain every time you showed the word to someone that it was a term you felt had to be invented because no existing Japanese word captured the meaning of the Hebrew word you wanted to express. Beyond that, whether or not your new word took hold in Japanese (like any word in any language) is constrained only by how widespread your influence is.
Aug
10
revised What Does 火信 Mean?
Updated based on information from testing the word on Japanese friends, and took into account Chinese origins.
Aug
10
comment What Does 火信 Mean?
@Tsuyoshi Ito: No one is doing anything random, and you are simply wrong that 火信 would not make sense to native speakers. I tested it on a few earlier today, and half guessed the intended meaning, and the other half guessed "belief in fire". But when creating words, which in this case is the completely non-random process of importing it from Chinese, then that is what happens - not everyone gets it right away. I'm going to edit my answer slightly, but my point still stands - Japanese can make up words, do it how they want, and the only thing that matters for validation is comprehension.
Aug
9
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
9
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Nice work! You're definitely in the right spirit of the question. I particularly like 大人のやりとり.
Aug
9
comment What Does 火信 Mean?
@Kobi: I would say that is a good fundamental definition of words. If two people understand it, it's a word. Though lets not get the the amateur Wittgensteins fired up! ;)
Aug
9
answered What Does 火信 Mean?
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Checked this answer partly because the bounty time limit was about to run out and something had to get chosen. Even though シンデレ is still a little off (it implies a suppression of feelings), it's probably the closest we're going to get. I knew we weren't going to magically discover a word never known before. The discussion, though, revealed many ways of talking about the topic with new vocabulary, and so the main goal of learning was achieved. This answer had the most material, but all the answers contributed to the goal and are much appreciated. Thanks to all for taking up the challenge.
Aug
8
accepted Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Aug
8
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@千里ちゃん: Nice! シンデレ has strong potential here. We may have a winner. I'm a little confused where the phrase "You know I like you, but we shouldn't ignore each other," came from, though. What is that in reference to?
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Thanks for your continued interest in this. I think one of the problems that is common in all the answers and discussion so far is that most of them are focused on the results, not the process. 甘い話, while problematic because of its associations with con-artistry, at least describes the type of speech behaviour. That's what differentiates the English term from a lot of the Japanese terms is that it can describe the way one is speaking/acting without necessarily saying what they hope to achieve. I would have thought that Japanese would be fantastic for expressing that kind of vagueness ;)
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
First, flirting is not reserved for high school students in English speaking cultures. Far from it. More importantly, though, I know that Japanese has a hard time expressing it. That's why I say this is a lexical gap. The only way to close a lexical gap is to utilize a term that is related but uncorrelated with with the undesired connotations, and then put that forward in situations that apply. In other words, participating in a language also involves helping create it. And I want to experiment with that as a learning exercise.