9,992 reputation
21984
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location 東京
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 6 hours ago

Lived in Japan for longer than I'd like to admit, given that my Japanese isn't where it should be given the time here.

I'm strongest in reading, and weakest in speaking. I can never express my thoughts accurately enough or fast enough.

I also have a lot of bad habits when it comes to grammar, having gone for so long without proper study. Japanese is not a language learned by osmosis. I'm hoping to stamp those quirks out by asking questions here.


Jan
21
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
This came up before, and although the question here is not a duplicate, you might want to see the comments on this question.
Jan
15
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, I feel I engaged you to address your legitimate concerns about factual accuracy, but I'm very sorry to say that the comment "helpful to yourself" comes across as a need to win an argument. Obviously, I put it as an answer because I feel it's helpful to others as well, and just because it's not the angle you would take doesn't mean it's not what others might benefit from. In the future, let's please just keep comments limited to trying to collaborate on the most accurate information possible, and leave it to individuals to decide what they find "useful" or not.
Jan
14
revised Confusion between using ga and wa
Edited title to use complete words.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, could you elaborate on why "do" is a bad parallel for する? In my dictionary, "to do", is the first definition for する.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, I've updated my answer to reflect the concerns you raised. I hope it's improved.
Jan
14
revised What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
Made clarifications based on comments.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, Fair enough. I agree it's not as unnatural as the English. Perhaps if you could think of an example where a [noun]をする construct merely created emphasis over the same noun in a [noun]する without sounding awkward, then that would drive your point home. As it is right now, I'm not sure what part of the context of 勉強 creates awkwardness that would not be there otherwise.
Jan
14
comment What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
@DariusJahandarie, Thanks for your comment, and I appreciate what you mean about focus, but there is a grammatical difference, and I think you might be discounting the unnaturalness of 勉強をしたい too much.
Jan
14
answered What is the difference (if any) between these two sentences?
Jan
13
comment What is the difference between まだしません and まだしていません?
@TokyoNagoya: It would be far more helpful to state what まだしない does mean than only saying it doesn't mean what's written in the answer.
Jan
11
comment Is 「でいい」 the same as 「でもいい」?
I corrected the spelling, grammar, and punctuation, which I think should be uncontroversial. Additionally, I couldn't help but also change the formatting a little, mainly highlighting the Japanese text. Only because otherwise there was so much punctuation it was a little hard to read. I hope that's acceptable.
Jan
11
revised Is 「でいい」 the same as 「でもいい」?
Corrected spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Also adjusted formatting.
Jan
11
comment ~したいと思います Does it mean exactly as translated? I think I want to
@JonathanC: Welcome to JLU. If you feel this answer is correct, please mark it with the check mark just underneath the up and down arrows to the left of the text.
Jan
10
comment How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
@DariusJahandarie, I've edited my answer to reflect what I've learned in the comments. Is what I say in my revision accurate enough?
Jan
10
revised How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
Hopefully corrected mistranslation, added better explanation.
Jan
10
comment How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
@DariusJahandarie, thanks for that. I still get thrown by 外来語 drawn from English words because I can't help but think of them in terms of what they mean to me in my native language. If the meaning in Japanese is more restricted to "an evaluation of something", then I can see how 昨日、僕がテストをした is a little quirky.
Jan
9
comment How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
@DariusJahandarie: Thanks for your explanation, but I'm actually still not clear on why テストをしました has to mean that the speaker tested someone else. I can see that テストした, which makes a verb of "test", and is therefor "tested", leans more to that meaning. In English "I tested..." seems incomplete and also implies acting a test on another. But in テストをしました, "test" is still a noun, meaning, "did a test", and as such, I can't see why a person couldn't say 昨日、僕がテストをした. Unless in Japanese テスト as a noun carries implications that it does not have in English...?
Jan
9
comment How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
@virmaior: No one should ever "swat down" anyone's answer. We're all here to learn Japanese, not punish people for what they don't know. If there is something wrong with an answer, as with mine, then edits or comments should contain suggestions to improve them. That way, the both the person who asked the original question can learn that much more, and the person who suggested the partially incorrect answer can both learn, and everyone wins that much more.
Jan
8
awarded  Pundit
Jan
8
comment How are these translations of “I had an exam yesterday” different?
Wow, @TokyoNagoya, that is quite hostile comment. Is it really so bad that I offered a way of comparing the sentences by offering their English counterparts? That you can offer more insight with suggestions of who might say these sentences is fine, but the clarity of the comparison is up to the individual to decide. It would be more helpful to the site to be supportive with more information, not swatting down subtleties you don't like.