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〖οτμκαЯе〗(´__`)


Jun
10
comment Why do Japanese titles often start with titles/appositions?
It happens in other languages as well, though, right? For example, these type of titles can be found in English... often used when trying to honor (or criticize) a certain person. It seems to be something that is used for some sort of humorous effect.
May
14
comment Irregularity of あ-series in demonstratives
@Gradius Thanks for the reminder; I noted this in the answer above beforehand, though... see this line: "in an essay (labeled as fictional... so take it with a grain of salt" That disclaimer is noted on many pages on that essay-style website... so it is speculative thought more than hard evidence, yes.
Apr
25
comment Why does furigana occasionally appear as katakana?
Sometimes this is just used to convey a particular meaning while using a different written character. :)
Apr
25
comment What differences, if any, are there between 婦 and 女?
It could be that characters like 婦 denote some sort of career-related (or work-related) meaning, because 帚 (the part on the right side of the character in question,) includes the meaning of a broom or brush (which, perhaps, includes the idea of housework?)
Apr
24
comment Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
It would seem to me, at least, that the writer is just combining two similar sentences into one longer sentence.
Apr
13
comment What does the “~ておく” mean in “任せておく”?
Whenever I see/hear 〜ておく being used... it seems to often follow the third meaning (that you listed above...) or... that something is to be done for future use (or for some future purpose.)
Apr
6
comment Difference between ほとんど~ない, めったに~ない and まれ
@ジョン まれ will come up from time to time in written form, at least. :)
Apr
4
comment Is there a figurative use to 春風?
From just searching around online... it does look like 春風 can be used in combination with something like 新しい+名詞 to convey the sense of "a new beginning." If I can find a more formal example of this... I'll try writing an answer later.
Apr
3
comment Does this convey “It's not surprising that ___”?
Yes, it could be translated like your "It's not surprising that..." line.
Mar
29
comment How to effectively start learning Japanese?
I still wonder if there isn't a better way to deal with language resource questions... as this forum is primarily in a language other than Japanese (English,) there will inevitably be more visitors asking about language-learning resources in the future.
Mar
28
comment translation for “It serves as a good reminder for me”?
@Flaw That makes sense; might have to do with the topic of morality, then.
Mar
26
comment What exactly does この通{とお}りmean?
@Pacerier Great question; that all has to do with the topic of "rendaku". More information can be found here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendaku. There is also a nicely-formatted (though not necessarily accurate,) article written about rendaku here, as well: tofugu.com/2011/08/23/rendaku-sequential-voicing-japanese
Mar
26
comment Trying to translate 遊ばにゃ損なってなもんだろうがおう!
@user1259 Welcome to the forum! You may already know this, but just a friendly note for the future: if someone posts an answer to your question here, make sure to "accept" the answer... so that the question has some sort of resolution for future visitors. :) Thanks~
Mar
23
comment When is it appropriate to use ごくろうさま?
@Chocolate true, true, that would be interesting; people my age always seem to end up using お疲れ〜 with me, and older people always seem to use ご苦労 with me, haha...
Mar
21
comment How to “shoo away” a sales clerk?
You could always say something like "thank you" and then just keep looking around on your own.
Mar
20
comment When is 終わる used as a transitive verb?
@TsuyoshiIto That does sound more natural, at least.
Mar
20
comment Are 終{お}わる and 済{す}ませる synonyms?
@dotnetN00b It looks like 済ませる would be for when there is a direct object, like in this example... but the meaning would still be relatively the same. But you might want to stick with 終わる・終える to keep things a bit more natural.
Mar
19
comment Are 終{お}わる and 済{す}ませる synonyms?
@dotnetN00b It sounds like the difference might be something like: use 済む here when you mean that something is "completely finished". Example: After you have (completely) finished your homework, you can have fun.
Mar
17
comment Just so you know
@infinitecardinal No problem! Welcome to the forum...!
Mar
16
comment Meaning of 真逆, how it is different from 逆
Just another thought: does slang have to be justified?