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〖οτμκαЯе〗(´__`)


Apr
8
comment しゅみについて meaning
What are you wanting that sentence to say?
Apr
8
comment What is the よっか in はじめよっか?
@dainichi Strictly speaking, fair point. I would still make an assertion, however, that はじめよっか is shortened in the sense that the ようか sound changes to a よっか sound which sounds more "clipped" (at least when spoken...) although there are the same number of morae in each phrase. Added something about this in the answer above; thanks for pointing that out!
Apr
7
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
@snailplane Nice link... but isn't the OP partly wondering about the Japanese side of when those words came about (or at least came to be used in Japanese?)
Apr
7
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
Here's another link that possibly points to the 1929 stock market crash as being somewhat related to this sort of usage. (Linked page is in Shift_JIS encoding.)
Apr
5
comment What is the よっか in はじめよっか?
I third your guess ;) Except... I'd be careful with using that style of speech unless you are older than the person with whom you are speaking. (Or if you are somehow related... or are really familiar with the person.)
Dec
11
comment pronunciation and meaning of the word 干支崩年
@DajkaLaszlo No problem! Yeah, that's a good description of the Japanese langauge :)
Jul
19
comment Linguistics and Japanese study
@JamieTaylor Actually, translating should help you; cool that you are doing some translating already :)
Jun
11
comment Why do Japanese titles often start with titles/appositions?
@sawa Maybe we will agree on something, someday.
Jun
10
comment Why do Japanese titles often start with titles/appositions?
It happens in other languages as well, though, right? For example, these type of titles can be found in English... often used when trying to honor (or criticize) a certain person. It seems to be something that is used for some sort of humorous effect.
May
14
comment Irregularity of あ-series in demonstratives
@Gradius Thanks for the reminder; I noted this in the answer above beforehand, though... see this line: "in an essay (labeled as fictional... so take it with a grain of salt" That disclaimer is noted on many pages on that essay-style website... so it is speculative thought more than hard evidence, yes.
Apr
25
comment Why does furigana occasionally appear as katakana?
Sometimes this is just used to convey a particular meaning while using a different written character. :)
Apr
25
comment What differences, if any, are there between 婦 and 女?
It could be that characters like 婦 denote some sort of career-related (or work-related) meaning, because 帚 (the part on the right side of the character in question,) includes the meaning of a broom or brush (which, perhaps, includes the idea of housework?)
Apr
24
comment Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
It would seem to me, at least, that the writer is just combining two similar sentences into one longer sentence.
Apr
24
comment Does 換骨奪胎 have negative connotation?
Any way we could know what book that is that you are reading?
Apr
13
comment What does the “~ておく” mean in “任せておく”?
Whenever I see/hear 〜ておく being used... it seems to often follow the third meaning (that you listed above...) or... that something is to be done for future use (or for some future purpose.)
Apr
6
comment Difference between ほとんど~ない, めったに~ない and まれ
@ジョン まれ will come up from time to time in written form, at least. :)
Apr
4
comment Is there a figurative use to 春風?
From just searching around online... it does look like 春風 can be used in combination with something like 新しい+名詞 to convey the sense of "a new beginning." If I can find a more formal example of this... I'll try writing an answer later.
Apr
3
comment Does this convey “It's not surprising that ___”?
Yes, it could be translated like your "It's not surprising that..." line.
Mar
29
comment How to effectively start learning Japanese?
I still wonder if there isn't a better way to deal with language resource questions... as this forum is primarily in a language other than Japanese (English,) there will inevitably be more visitors asking about language-learning resources in the future.
Mar
28
comment translation for “It serves as a good reminder for me”?
@Flaw That makes sense; might have to do with the topic of morality, then.