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〖οτμκαЯе〗(´__`)


Apr
24
comment What does 正宗で大根を切る。 言い出しっぺ。 mean?
@silvermaple Good advice for future questions :)
Apr
23
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
Does this response answer the entire question being asked? ^^
Apr
23
comment What does 正宗で大根を切る。 言い出しっぺ。 mean?
@silvermaple At the same time, I'm not without at least some bias in this overall post... :) so, please take my earlier response with a grain of salt :|
Apr
22
comment What does 正宗で大根を切る。 言い出しっぺ。 mean?
@silvermaple For what it's worth (and after checking the relevant FAQ-related information on translations,) it would seem to me that this type of question is more than a standard "dictionary lookup" translation... because it ultimately involves the meaning behind the ideas presented (not just the words in and of themselves.) In other words, it's not necessarily a word-for-word translation question. :)
Apr
22
comment What does 正宗で大根を切る。 言い出しっぺ。 mean?
@gekkostate Sure thing; sorry about that! In romaji, those phrases would be: "daikon (w)o masamune de kiru" and the second phrase would be: "iidashippe" :)
Apr
21
comment Problem understanding some parts in a sentence -てくの and -んだろうって
What is the overall context of this sentence? (Where does it come from?) :)
Apr
13
comment Etymology of もん・もの
@snailplane Interesting examples given in that link; especially those in Part 6 (in particular, the substitution possibilities given for もん at the end of a sentence... as well as the sometimes-implied dissatisfaction expressed with that sort of もん.)
Apr
13
comment Etymology of もん・もの
@user1205935 If it helps any, here's another dictionary entry for もん that might further help to explain the usage difference: gokanji.com/cgi-bin/j-e/euc/… When it comes down to it, there may not (in this case, perhaps,) be a clear explanation (historical, linguistic-based, or otherwise) as to how もん ended up being used as a particle at the end of a sentence; languages can be funny like that, sometimes...
Apr
12
comment Etymology of もん・もの
@user1205935 Actually, for the particle case (case 1) I don't think it particularly relates to 物... that's for case 2 :) Sorry if I didn't write that clearly. Children (or someone trying to be like a child) could use もん, I suppose, but I hear it most often from female speakers. It's just not something I would normally hear from a male speaker... unless it was used as a joke... or maybe used in a direct quote from someone else... etc. (although this could change in the future...)
Apr
12
comment Why “you don't have to want to hold”?
Where did this sentence come from? :)
Apr
12
comment Is there some way that a Japanese (sur)name must be written for it to make sense?
Are you planning on making a new surname? :)
Apr
9
comment What is the わ in 忌まわしい and 嘆かわしい?
Thanks for posting it for future readers :)
Apr
9
comment Konnichiwa and Konbanwa
To help get you started, "konnichi wa" can be used as a general greeting (often during daytime hours) whereas "konban wa" tends to be used during evening hours.
Apr
8
comment しゅみについて meaning
Sorry, the sentence would read something like: "I am a mystery; I like anime." Is this an online sort of class that you're taking?
Apr
8
comment What is the よっか in はじめよっか?
@dainichi Strictly speaking, fair point. I would still make an assertion, however, that はじめよっか is shortened in the sense that the ようか sound changes to a よっか sound which sounds more "clipped" (at least when spoken...) although there are the same number of morae in each phrase. Added something about this in the answer above; thanks for pointing that out!
Apr
7
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
@snailplane Nice link... but isn't the OP partly wondering about the Japanese side of when those words came about (or at least came to be used in Japanese?)
Apr
7
comment Etymology of 赤字/黒字
Here's another link that possibly points to the 1929 stock market crash as being somewhat related to this sort of usage. (Linked page is in Shift_JIS encoding.)
Apr
5
comment What is the よっか in はじめよっか?
I third your guess ;) Except... I'd be careful with using that style of speech unless you are older than the person with whom you are speaking. (Or if you are somehow related... or are really familiar with the person.)
Dec
11
comment pronunciation and meaning of the word 干支崩年
@DajkaLaszlo No problem! Yeah, that's a good description of the Japanese langauge :)
Jul
19
comment Linguistics and Japanese study
@JamieTaylor Actually, translating should help you; cool that you are doing some translating already :)