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〖οτμκαЯе〗(´__`)


May
16
comment Encountered な with ten-ten
You might want to check out this old (2002) thread about this sort of thing: q.hatena.ne.jp/1040004428#a7692 Interesting thread :)
May
15
comment What's the most appropriate negative potential form for this situation?
@istrasci Thanks for the clarification. I guess my main point about "simplicity" in regard to the Japanese language is the idea that there will often be cases where we can't directly convert our native language understanding to another language (such as Japanese) :) Even when grammar is correct (or at least theoretically correct,) the usage might still (unfortunately) be formed from our native language understanding... instead of thinking from the perspective of the other language (i.e. thinking in Japanese.)
May
14
comment 上手(じょうず)vs。上手い(うまい)
@yadokari Two different words... though sharing some similarities :)
May
13
comment What verb is in 覚­えてみたい?
@EricDong Interesting point about the 覚{さと}る reading, though :)
May
12
comment への対へ/に-Difference between への and へ/に
@Tony I've updated the answer above to include at least some sort of answer to each of your questions within your original post. Hope some of it helps... and again, good detective work with the link you found earlier!
May
12
comment への対へ/に-Difference between への and へ/に
@Tony Good find! And great to see your effort with all of this! And as for your question about if「への」is commonly used, I would say "yes". :)
May
12
comment への対へ/に-Difference between への and へ/に
@Tony Let's look at the「の」particle, here; in the example:「あなたへの愛」if we were to write the phrase like this:「あなたへ愛」it might still work... at least on a poetic level, but it would possibly need a comma to break up the sentence, like this:「あなたへ、愛」which could be a reversed version of this:「愛、あなたへ」. When you add the「の」particle, it at least begins to connect this otherwise disjointed phrase... and it introduces a more definite idea of what we are focusing on in this phrase. ^^;
May
12
comment Help translating this japanese sentence please?
@Dai Nice work :)
May
11
comment Can 助動詞(auxiliary verbs) be used with other 助動詞?
@firtree No problem; and sorry if my answers came off too "teacher-like"; I'm only a student, myself. I think I know what you were getting at by dropping the particles in those examples... but technically-speaking, if we look at what particles might go between those words and verbs... I think the examples then become different than the original 複合動詞{ふくごうどうし} question... :)
May
11
comment Can 助動詞(auxiliary verbs) be used with other 助動詞?
@firtree Even if these are two different examples, I still do not see where there would be two verbs being combined, here :) 手続きが無事に終わりました。 and 〜お目にかかり、相談しました。 Whatever compounds there are here are actually being broken up by particles or punctuation... as far as I can tell. ^^;
May
11
comment Can 助動詞(auxiliary verbs) be used with other 助動詞?
@firtree Just for my clarification, what are you wanting this example sentence to say in English? At the moment, I don't see a place in that sentence where there are two verbs being combined... :) (I do see places where there is a noun+verb being combined... and where there are some dropped particles... but I do not see a place where two or more verbs are being combined.)
May
11
comment Can 助動詞(auxiliary verbs) be used with other 助動詞?
@firtree Can you give an example of a "free chain" verb?
May
10
comment Can 助動詞(auxiliary verbs) be used with other 助動詞?
@snailboat Thanks; for the sake of this particular question, I am mostly trying to borrow a couple of examples from the paper to illustrate that there are times where triple verb compounds can occur. :) I haven't heard of the term "lexicalized compound verb", before; thanks for the comment.
May
9
comment What is the meaning of “beta”?
@eru Interesting transition with the "cliché" idea to "what else"... it does seem to sound a bit more modern than using the actual word "clichéd" in the sentence, like this: "It might sound a little clichéd, but my next destination is Chicago."
May
8
comment What is the meaning of “beta”?
Could you provide a little more context for where you found this word (where it appears... or if this word is written in katakana, etc.)?
May
7
comment Japanese construction verb+noun, how do I interpret it. I am confused!
それでも、ナイスショットですよ〜
Apr
30
comment Does all kana in the う line rhyme?
"but not any other pair"? :) In (modern-day) normal circumstances, each syllable of the "う line" (う、く、す、つ、ぬ、ふ、む、ゆ、る) does rhyme. :) There will be times where people shorten the pronunciation of す... and times where a small っ won't be voiced... but technically speaking, that whole う line would normally rhyme.
Apr
29
comment How to playfully scold someone?
What if you were to just use something like: "お久しぶり"?
Apr
27
comment Should I use On reading or Kun reading for numbers?
@BraedenOrchard Here's at least one general "rule" you could keep in mind when it comes to ON vs KUN readings for words in Japanese (in general): use ON when you have combined kanji (for example: 天気{てんき}, 漢字{かんじ}, 同情{どうじょう}, etc.) and use KUN when you have single kanji or single kanji+hiragana (for example: 緑{みどり}, 書く{か}, 読む{よ}, etc.) This is just a general idea of a "rule", though, and there will probably always be exceptions (especially when reading books... where character readings might be more varied than normal.)
Apr
26
comment pronounciation of じょ and よ
@ssb Joad is a surname. (As in Tom Joad from The Grapes of Wrath.)