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Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
comment Pronouncing が as 'nga'
To me, the が sounds different regardless if it's preceded by ん but perhaps this is just pronunciation differences with proximity of different sounds. Maybe what I've been hearing is ですんが when I thought people were saying "ですが". I've heard のです and のが but have not yet come across ですのが and perhaps didn't realized that there was also a contracted form ですんが.
Jun
8
awarded  Scholar
Jun
8
accepted What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
Jun
1
revised Pronouncing が as 'nga'
fixed some simple mistakes in verbage
Jun
1
comment Commonness of casual phrases like “あたし” and “ちっちゃい”
Also words like あったかい instead of あたたかい although I'm not sure whether it would be spelled with a っ
Jun
1
awarded  Commentator
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
With one caveat, 寒い(samui) also seems to describe a persons physical experience of a relatively cold temperature. So one could feel cold air and state that it feels 冷たい when they walk out of the house but after a walking about in the winter air for an more than an hour they may describe themselves as 寒い. In this case samui seems to describe the experience of being physically cold and I'm assuming it is reserved for humans but it may be used to describe the experience of cold temperatures for other living things such as animals perhaps.
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
@Tsuyoshi - Ok, perhaps this eludes to the fact that air is recognized as tangible so that 寒い is really reserved to more abstract concepts like weather. I wonder if there are any other cases where it is used.
Jun
1
comment Pronouncing が as 'nga'
My guess is that the difference in pronunciation is very similar to how the t's in the word Button are regularly not pronounced in English because the consonant is just to strong for the middle of the word. Since language normally follows the path of least resistance, "nga" like the softened t's in Button is just easier for many native Japanese speakers to pronounce and many may be quite unaware that they are doing so.
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
I've come up with the same explanation myself for why air may have been given special terms in that in that air/gas isn't precievably tangable in the same way that solids and liquids are so using a words that normally describes intangble materials for air makese sense in that case. I'm curious why the use of 冷たい in modern times isn't acceptable however since it is more technically correct given the fact that gasses are still just another form of matter. I'm assuming scientific literature must have a preference for describing relatively cool temperatures of a gas.
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
@Mark Hosang & @rcjsuen - I've made the requested edits to my original question to help clarify my confusion.
Jun
1
revised What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
Provided some example of cases that make use of these two words confusing for me
Jun
1
awarded  Editor
Jun
1
revised What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
added 84 characters in body
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
Ahhh, so warm and hot do have analogues but they just happen to be pronounced the same as their "to the touch" counterparts only differing when in written form.
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
I have to admit that I like this explanation because it is very logical however I'm tempted to doubt that it is this simple. Going off of the assumption that it is correct however, I suppose this would rule out 寒い for scientific purposes as it is more of a subjective description of a persons tolerance to a particular temperature. So it would be strange to say something like the planet Neptune's moon's are 寒い since it's unrealistic that anybody would ever touch it and thus should never be able to equate it to a personal sense of unpleasantness.
Jun
1
awarded  Supporter
Jun
1
awarded  Student
Jun
1
comment What is the real difference between the proper use of the words さむい and つめたい?
I've heard 冷たい used to describe unpleasant things as well though such as jumping into a frozen lake or having an ice cube slipped down your shirt. So it seems like there is still something about the word さむい that makes it inapplicable to common cases where a person physically feels an object except for air. Strangely it seems that the word さむい is used in general when somebody describes their reaction to being cold such as when jumping into cold water or air but when you ask them to describe the water itself they use つめたい or at least that's what I recall at the moment.