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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen May 30 '12 at 22:16

May
19
comment Why do some kanji have furigana that are not valid readings?
A common one would be 宇宙船{ふね}
May
5
comment Is “今の” in “今のは誰?” considered a synthetic noun?
Well there is also the general rule of using no more than 2 or a maximum of 3 のs in a noun before you just start omitting them. Because of that general rule of thumb it is extremely rare to even have something with 3 のs in it?
May
4
comment Is “今の” in “今のは誰?” considered a synthetic noun?
The grammatical correctness of it relies on the listeners ability to assumed the obvious. Personally I would say 2 のs are the limit, but I would not consider myself a native speaker either. This question is best suited for a native.
May
2
comment How can you figure out whether 鍵【かぎ】 means “lock” or “key”?
In Japanese 鍵 is almost always lock. In the cases it is not it is very easy to tell by the context of the sentence.
May
2
comment Why is “there” pronounced あそこ and not just あこ?
I am sorry to say that I don't think this is a very good question. Whys rarely are. In most cases languages are just arbitrary rules development over time, rather than things with clear reasoning behind them.
May
2
comment When is it appropriate to refer to yourself using your name, rather than 私 (or others)?
@ジョン i mean in place of using a "you" pronoun. For example it is very rare to hear あなたは~ですか patterns and is even considered rude in many cases. However ジョンさんは~ですか like patterns are very common even mid conversation with that person. In the same way one might replace an "I" pronoun with their own name in order to indirectly state things about themselves.
May
2
comment What is the meaning of ~んです?
Do you have a reliable source that states that んだ and のだ are always equal? I don't think that they are. For example I have never once heard のだ used in a sentence like this the following. 本当にしたいんですけど、できません.
May
1
comment When is it appropriate to refer to yourself using your name, rather than 私 (or others)?
Well this is also a case of trying to be indirect. It applies most often when talking about others.
May
1
comment What is the difference between ~すぎ and ~すぎる?
@ジョン yes that is what I meant. My basic grammar seems to be falling apart since I moved away from Japan.
Apr
29
comment Pronunciation of す in です and the end of ます verbs
@ジョン I was talking to a person from Kansai today and noticed them use a very extended る sound, it was like るうぅぅ. This adds something to the argument that people from Kansai do this. The sentence it was used in was a question of sorts. However I notice no extra ぅ sounds on any of her other sentences. Personally I think this adds credibly to what I said above. However it also adds credibly to comments that say it is regional. If this sound is regional, it is not something that is used outside of a limited set of contexts. However I am not sure what those contexts are.
Apr
28
comment What is the difference between ~すぎ and ~すぎる?
@rintaun From the perspective of meaning, the only difference between the two forms is one conveys time and the other doesn't. This means that the forms that do convey time in their meaning can only be used in the correct context, while forms without a time element to their meaning can be used in any context since they will inherit the time element from that context. The other people here are attempting to point out how they are grammatically different, yet they are ignoring the differences in meanings.
Apr
26
comment How do you write someone's name if you don't know what kanji to use?
The reason why they tend to write names in katakana is because katakana is thought of as a direct display of the sounds. Basically the line of thinking is "I don't know his name, but this what it sounds like". Whereas kanji and hiragana are thought of as displaying meaningful words.
Apr
26
comment Who decides what katakana will be used to form English loan words?
@Jesse No they do. The government can't regulate the use of the language beyond official documents and the minimum requirement for education. There is no rule stating "news papers can only use these words", or "books can't use these words". Japanese magazines are famous for just making up new katakana words.
Apr
24
comment What exactly does “るぅ” mean?
@Pacerier It definitely can be used to make fun of the other person. However this is normally targeted at English speakers attempting to speak Japanese since beginners normally extend the u sounds more than they should.
Apr
24
comment Problem understanding a sentence
@xrac That would be トムより高い, the は makes all the difference
Apr
22
comment Using な or ね when addressing a mixed-gender group?
I wouldn't put much trust in what teachers/text books tell you is masculine or feminine when it comes to the end of sentences. When you are out in the real world in Japan you often hear most of supposedly gender specific particles use by almost everyone.
Apr
19
comment Which kanji to use for saying ありがとうございます in emails?
What have seen doing business in Japan is that 有難う is very common. However 御座います is basically never used. Other than that all the possibilities are fine.
Apr
19
comment Pronunciation of す in です and the end of ます verbs
The point I am trying to make here is that I have never heard it pronounced differently based on region or other personal factors. を however is pronounced differently between different people. What you are referring to is not the pronunciation anyways, it is the tone. It is a falling tone normally, so you hearing it or not hearing it depends on the volume of the speakers voice more than anything. Remember just because something isn't noticeably audible doesn't mean it wasn't pronounced.
Apr
17
comment General rules in negative adjectives in superpolite form
No, it really isn't. ござる follows it's own special rules.
Apr
1
comment Do viruses あります or います?
@sawa It would probably be more constructive if you read the information provided by wikipedia rather than insisting on repeating your own personal opinion.