1,926 reputation
432
bio website
location Fukuoka, Japan
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Oct 6 '13 at 10:31

Jan
16
comment Fast Food Conversation - Any Practical Guides?
This question is a bit broad, but I think a few phrases might help you out. The phrases I hear from the staff at fast food places are generally always the same. "店内でお召し上がりですか?" This is generally asked first and means "Will you eat here?" to which you can reply either "Yes" or "持ち帰りで(お願いします)" (take away please). Then you can go ahead and order. Another one I hear often is "ご注文をお伺い致します" which means "I'll take your order now", so all you have to do is say what you want. Hopefully these 3 phrases can help you out.
Oct
13
comment Can 野郎{やろう} really have that many meanings?
I have absolutely no clue where you got the idea that "guy" could be considered sexual discrimination. This is absolutely not the case in English, at least not in Australian English. Also, "guys" can also refer to a group of people, of mixed genders. It is a very common greeting, "hey guys!". This does not indicate "only males".
Sep
28
comment How long of a time period does 最近 cover?
I don't see the English bias, is it because the question was asked in English? What if we were to ask the question in Japanese, like this guy: detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1117338791 There are countless others to be found on Google too.
Sep
24
comment Does Vて+いる always mean an action already completed?
+1. Really want to know the answer to this.
Sep
23
comment Can I use 行っている間(に) in the sense of a habitual action?
As far as I'm aware, ている、even with 行く, can mean both "going" and the state resulting after going depending on context. どこに行ってるの? Correct me if im wrong but, I believe this could be used to mean "where are you going?" rather than "where have you gone and now are?".
Sep
20
comment Why are there two versions of the kanji for "tsumetai'?
@sawa is correct. It's simply handwriting vs print. Different styles. 冷 vs storage.kamezo.cc/asp/katchnetwork/img_17/178038/k693197271.jpg (The last stroke is simply angled instead of perfectly vertical.)
Sep
15
comment Where does the verbal form しとく come from?
Found this: homepage3.nifty.com/i-yasu/Lesson33.htm Just before the last bullet point there is a list of commonly used verbs which change in spoken language. 話しておく → 話しとく, 飲んでおく → 飲んどく, etc.
Sep
15
comment Where does the verbal form しとく come from?
I thought this was a contraction of しておく. I may be off, though.
Sep
14
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
@sawa: That's how it was written when I found the examples, error on the author's part?
Sep
13
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
Just double checked Google, there are a few million results for "閉まってある”, for example: "本棚に閉まってある本", "本当に大切な事は閉まってある". I thought this wasn't acceptable? Every day, something I was taught about Japanese gets blown out of the water.
Sep
13
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
(Edited, due to it being a typo.) Additionally, I think using "just" in the translation for 電車が来た is a little off. There are separate grammar points which express the meaning of "just" in Japanese. 来た merely shows the action has completed, and implies nothing of when, no?
Sep
8
comment Differences between 度 and 回 when counting occurrences
I wonder what the differences are when asking questions, as in: 何度 vs 何回? If you say 何度 are you expecting an answer less than 6 times?
Aug
26
comment Where does the いかない in ~わけにはいかない come from?
I thought that was the question. I'm interested in where it came from and why it means what it does. I was merely guessing in the original question due to the same pronunciation.
Aug
25
comment What is the role of の in 「お父さんのバカ!」
@Karl Knetchel I think it's very similar in English too, though. The fansubbers probably just bring it down to the bare meaning. I see this happen in translation a lot. For example if we say "That was very stupid of my father." We are essentially saying "My father's behaviour was stupid." or "My father was stupid. (In that case)". This usage of "of", is quite common too. "That was silly of her.", "How brave of you", "How ridiculous of him to suggest such a thing." etc. However, I'm no where near an expert on grammatical issues, I'm just thinking out loud here.
Aug
25
comment What is the role of の in 「お父さんのバカ!」
@Karl Knetchel It's perfectly correct to say something like "That was very stupid of my father." in English. You don't need the 'ity' in those cases.
Aug
25
comment What is the difference between 〜ないではいられない and 〜ずにはいられない
I've never even seen なくてはいられなかった... D:
Aug
22
comment What is this crazy guy shouting?
I made a few comments on Soundcould for what I could hear, but it doesn't make /any/ sense, so I assume I'm hearing it utterly wrong. Especially the last part where he seems to forget what he was talking about.
Aug
21
comment ことにする vs. ことに決める
Oh okay, yeah that makes perfect sense. I originally took your answer to mean the decision AND action have both been completed.
Aug
21
comment ことにする vs. ことに決める
I don't think this is completely correct. ことにした is referring to a decision being made, not the action being completed. For example: 夏は北海道を旅行することにした. This means you have decided that you will travel around Hokkaido in summer, not that it has been completed.
Aug
21
comment Contrasting 〜てならない、〜てしょうがない and 〜てたまらない
I'm trying to get a feel of WHY these phrases are used when expressing uncontrollable emotions. I understand if the translation were more on the literal side, it's going to sound awkward and hard to understand. But it may assist in my comprehension of these 3 phrases and when each are to be used. As for a), I wasn't trying to say something different. The "just won't do" is, like you've stated, is clearly related to the frustration. As for b), again it's linked to the frustration. "(There is nothing that can be done (about the frustration))." Sorry for the incomprehensibility.