2,026 reputation
535
bio website
location Fukuoka, Japan
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 6 '13 at 10:31

Aug
2
accepted The difference between 書物、図書 and 本
Aug
2
asked The difference between くらい and ほど in hyperbole
Aug
2
asked Contrasting っぽい、らしい、みたい
Jul
31
comment What does しちゃい mean?
This sentence isn't odd at all. If you read the first tweet (comes second in this question) you can see that he/she wrote: 「無理してはいけません」と書きたかったところ、「無視してはいけません」と書いてしまいました。to which this person replied: いいえ!無視はしちゃいけませんな somewhat jokingly.
Jul
29
comment How to say, “things like”
Ohhh, I see the logic. He could be asking for either, without an example sentence or context I don't think we can tell.
Jul
29
comment How to say, “things like”
I think he understands the functions of とか、など and し and was more asking how to say things like "Aみたいな物", "Aのような物”, ”Aと似ているもの”.
Jul
29
comment does anyone know of any o-words or go-words which are absolutely neutral?
I wonder if おまえ counts.
Jul
28
comment Difference between ◯◯を掃除 and ◯◯に掃除
It would be amazing what you would learn if you just opened ANY beginner Japanese textbook instead of "language hacking" using Twitter.
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
@Derek Schaab: In my grammar book this is explained as follows: "In casual conversation wake, an informal form of wake da, is used quite frequently to give slight emphasis to a fact when the speaker does not expect the hearer to know about it.". Which I think sums it up quite nicely.
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
To be fair, it's quite hard to determine what exactly the question was asking. There are many ways to "end a sentence in wake" which have been discussed here.
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
@Derek Schaab: Thank you! I haven't had a chance yet to read the paper yet, I'll give it a look as soon as possible.
Jul
28
comment How to end a sentence in わけ
Perhaps this warrants its own question, however, is it possible to replace some of these with ということ? For example: "波がずいぶん荒いですね。今日は船が出せないわけですか。" into "波がずいぶん荒いですね。今日は船が出せないということですか。" How does the feeling of the sentence change if this is possible?
Jul
27
comment What does こと refer to in だけのことはある
@sawa That question was incredibly helpful in understanding the overall meaning (especially the "だけ" aspect) however I couldn't seem to find any good reason as to why こと has been thrown haphazardly into the mix. I tried to differentiate this question by focusing on こと and contrasting between both だけのことはあって and だけあって.
Jul
27
asked What does こと refer to in だけのことはある
Jul
26
comment に vs で again: 前に vs 後で
I was under the impression that に or で can be used with 後。Google agrees and it seems that 食べた後に is more common than 食べた後で。How I feel about this however, is that に indicates you will do the action soon after eating, where as で is much more ambiguous. 食べた後に水を飲む indicates that you will drink water soon after eating. Where as で would be used like 食べた後で勉強する, this indicates you will study after eating, but not necessarily right away. (Could be something in between eating and studying). However, since this is all just gut feeling, I would LOVE if someone could confirm or deny this.
Jul
25
comment Anti-causal/Non-causal relationship
@Axioplase: They seem pretty natural to me. "The explosion is not due to pressure.", "The explosion is not because of the pressure", "The explosion did not arise from the pressure", "There are other reasons for the explosion". They all sound perfectly fine to me.
Jul
25
comment Differences in meaning of using へ, に, or で in marking locations.
@Flaw Like Axioplase has already stated we have quite a few ways to do the same thing in English. "I will go to the beach" vs "I'm going to head toward/to the beach". Whilst the destination is known and both sentences roughly mean the same thing, the nuance is slightly different.
Jul
24
revised The difference between Aが見える and Bを見る
Edited to address the actual question.
Jul
24
comment The difference between Aが見える and Bを見る
@language hacker: Can you update your question?
Jul
23
comment Is a computer displaying “インストールしています” correct? Weird?
Oh really? I'm sure I had seen されています used somewhere. Does this mean, in this context that passive + います is not being used to indicate an on-going action, but is instead indicating a STATE? I was going on the assumption that "インストールしています" == "something is installing" vs "インストールされています" == "something is being installed". I take it my understanding of the passive form is incorrect?