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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Jan
29
accepted Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
Jan
28
answered What's the difference between “gohan” and “meshi”?
Jan
28
comment Usage of 「ごめんください」
@sawa Yahoo does not seem to agree dic.yahoo.co.jp/dsearch/0/0ss/107228500000 But I must admit that I too have only heard it used when somebody enters a house
Jan
28
comment How can I differentiate between feet and legs?
@flamingspinach How about older/big brother and younger/little brother? Or does it have to be one word?
Jan
28
comment How can I differentiate between feet and legs?
@Pacerier 足首まで砂に埋もれている would work.
Jan
28
comment Is this a proper use of tara and toki for “when”?
Most results for みんなさん on Google are by non-natives. It seems to also exist in some dialects. But in standard Japanese, I need to see more proof before I believe it.
Jan
27
comment which instruments use 弾く and which use 引く?
@WillihamTotland Why the focus on the single move? To play go, in the general sense, is 碁を打つ if I'm not mistaken.
Jan
27
comment Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
@alexandrec, thanks for showing interest! Ah yeah, forgot the single-mora exception. Updated the question to reflect that. As for compound nouns, I can't think of one with a drop after the last mora. Do you have one handy?
Jan
27
revised Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
Forgot single-mora exception
Jan
27
answered How does a noun phrase translate into a verb?
Jan
27
comment Reading fractions
@Matt +1 for tracing it back to Chinese. Although I don't know much Chinese, I was able to look up that 分 can also be a verb meaning divide. Since I believe 之 is an old version of the relative-clause-ender 的, 三分之二 could be taken to mean 'the 2 that 3 divides', i.e. '2 divided by 3'. At this point, we're really outside the scope of this forum, but I'd still be interested in the opinion of any Chinese speakers.
Jan
27
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
@istrasci: [[... no more the case for 留学 than for 勉強しに行く]]
Jan
27
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
I'd like to see any back up of the claim that 留学 implies language study. I know several 留学生 studying in Japan, where language study is not part of the curriculum. Sure, when you study abroad, language is an obvious candidate subject, but that is no more the case for 留学 than for 勉強しに行く.
Jan
26
comment Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
Thank you very much for the elaborate answer. So 次の and あの人 are special cases, and 日 has different pitch as day and sun. That sounds reasonable. However, I think I've heard other cases where この/あの changes things. For example, in 国が there's no drop, while in この国↓が I feel it's more natural to have a drop after 国. Unless 国 is another special case, I feel there might be some other principle in play. Either way, I'm thinking maybe I should buy the NHK pronunciation dictionary after all. I'll wait and see if people come up with other suggestions.
Jan
26
comment What is the difference between 〜となる and 〜になる?
@TsuyoshiIto That makes total sense, you've convinced me. Thank you very much for taking the time to explain.
Jan
26
comment Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
@chocolate Thanks for showing interest! I was actually pretty certain that this question would be totally ignored :P
Jan
26
asked Sentence level pitch accent for 標準語
Jan
26
comment Why is 自分 used instead of 私?
@Dave, I'd say there's a slight difference. The other question is about using it as a first person pronoun, this question focuses more on its hyoujungo use to refer back to the topic. But sure, there's some overlap, since it's natural to bring in some perspective.
Jan
26
comment The meaning of ~のみ
@oldergod, what kind of keigo would this be? Sonkeigo, kenjougo or teineigo? I think 'formal' might be more precise than 'written'. Formal language is used in spoken language all the time.
Jan
26
comment What is the difference between 〜となる and 〜になる?
@TsuyoshiIto, Aha, thanks for pointing that out. I'm not very strong in classical Japanese. Are you saying that both verbs have 連体形 なる, but the auxiliary verb has 終止形 なり, whereas the non-auxiliary なる has 終止形 なる, even classically? If this is the case, you've completely convinced me, although I'm still surprised that they do not share etymology.