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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Mar
30
comment What are the valid potential forms of special “suru” verbs?
@Pacerier, 愛しうらない doesn't work. うる is really a fossilized 連体形 of the classical Japanese (auxiliary) 下二段活用 verb う, which in negative would be えぬ・えず. In modern Japanese 下二段活用 verbs turned into 下一段活用 verbs, i.e. える with negative えない. In short, える and うる are really the same verb, the latter is just a fossilized archaic conjugation. Negative is the same for both.
Mar
29
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
読書 is also a noun by itself, but according to Chocolate, 読書に行く is not possible. My question is when it is possible and when it is not.
Mar
29
comment When are へ and に used together?
@Flaw Done japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/5134/…
Mar
29
asked When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
Mar
28
comment When are へ and に used together?
I don't think it's a typo. せんたくに sounds OK to me, and looking up the fable 桃太郎, which I think this is from, this is the usual formulation. I'm just wondering why you can omit it, since it doesn't seem to be a general rule
Mar
28
comment When are へ and に used together?
I don't know if this is what OP is asking, but why is it せんたくに, not せんたくしに? I don't think it's always allowed to omit the し in しに, for example, saying 勉強に帰る instead of 勉強しに帰る sounds strange.
Mar
28
comment Does subject marker が always have to be before the conjugated verb?
If you're asking if you can omit the が in your example sentence, the answer is no.
Mar
28
comment Does subject marker が always have to be before the conjugated verb?
Instead of what? 私はいました is a correct sentence, but means something else. 私、いました and maybe even いました、私 are heard in speech, although not correct by the strictest of measures. Again, it's not very clear what you are asking.
Mar
28
comment Does subject marker が always have to be before the conjugated verb?
いました is a full sentence by itself, so is 彼{かれ}はいました. None of these have a が. But maybe this is not what you're asking? Could you clarify the question?
Mar
27
answered What are the valid potential forms of special “suru” verbs?
Mar
27
comment “10倍もの” vs “10倍の”
@Pacerier 個{こ} can be used for any number of items. つ-numbers, which are native Japanese, only exist up to 9, ひとつ ふたつ みっつ よっつ いつつ むっつ ななつ やっつ ここのつ. There are also native Japanese words for numbers bigger than 9, とお もも etc, but they're not used much, and I'm not sure they have つ versions and/or can be used as counters.
Mar
26
comment “10倍もの” vs “10倍の”
@Pacerier こ. つ only goes up to 9.
Mar
26
comment Trying to translate 遊ばにゃ損なってなもんだろうがおう!
@Dono, if you're able to parse the sentence with 損なって as そこなって, please explain. I personally lean towards believing that 損って was corrected to 損なって because somebody thought it was an おくりがな error
Mar
26
comment Trying to translate 遊ばにゃ損なってなもんだろうがおう!
I feel like I'm missing something... the sentence doesn't really make sense if 損なって is そこなって. If 損 is そん, I would say 遊ばにゃ損ってなもんだろうが. Can you provide more context?
Mar
26
comment “10倍もの” vs “10倍の”
@Pacerier Removing the の doesn't seem right, since it would turn 神経細胞 into a counter word. But you're right, there's no counter word in the first place, so you could argue that it really should be 40億個の神経細胞. Omitting the counter feels acceptable in this case where the number is so big, though.
Mar
26
answered In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
Mar
23
comment The role of と particle in 「二度としない」
@TsuyoshiIto I agree that と is productive, but the と in the most common usage of 二度と is not an instance of this (although it obviously stems from it etymologically). In the most common usage, 二度と does not mean "twice", but "(not) ever again", i.e. you can say 二度とやるなよ about something that somebody has already done many times.
Mar
23
comment In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
I don't understand your argument about why the loss of the predicative/attributive distinction happened at the same time as the replacement of negative forms with ない. They could have happened independently, no? I.e. hypothetically you could have used ~ぬ for both predicative and attributive, or you could have had separate predicative/attributive negative forms with ない, i.e. 食べなし vs. 食べなき.
Mar
23
answered How to say two actions are the cause of a third?
Mar
23
answered When do you use するには as opposed to するため(には) to mean “in order to”?