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Apr
26
comment Conjugation of いけない or いける?
Might wanna take a look at japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/4746/… as well.
Apr
25
revised Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
edited body
Apr
25
answered Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
Apr
25
comment Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
Only one を per sentence is definitely not a rule. One per clause, maybe. So the question is, is this two clauses with the verb dropped in the first one, or one clause with multiple objects... it seems more complicated than just combining objects with と or や, since there are different adverbial phrases hanging off the objects.
Apr
5
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
This sounds plausible (although maybe a bit fuzzy). So in the example from 桃太郎 in the linked question, 洗濯に行く works, because it is understood that grandma couldn't do laundry at home, and therefore had to go to the river...
Apr
4
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
Yeah, 読書に行く does get quite a few google hits. Can you clarify "depends on the meaning"? So are there any guidelines or do you need to memorize on a word by word basis?
Apr
3
comment What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
@ジョン I think it's rare to ask a question with a negative verb (wihtout んです) unless you have the expectation/invitation aspect. If it's a neutral question, I would just ask 空いていますか. If there's a contextual clue that the other person is not hungry, I would ask 空いていないんですか. But I guess in other situations it's possible, e.g. a mother scolding her child: 「先生はまっすぐ帰れって言わなかった?」「うん、言わなかった」But then, 「うん、言った」doesn't sound completely wrong to me either. Yes, repeating the verb is very common.
Apr
3
answered “乗せる” vs “乗っける”
Apr
2
comment What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
I disagree. I would reply はい、空いています to your question. See also my answer. In all situations I can think of, you would be asking this question because either you're hungry yourself, asking for agreement, or you have reason to expect that the other person is hungry, and maybe you're inviting them to eat something.
Apr
2
answered What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
30
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
@sawa, thanks for editing. Yes, I admit my quoting of Chocolate's comment was too verbatim. The question is clearer now!
Mar
30
comment What are the valid potential forms of special “suru” verbs?
@Pacerier, 愛しうらない doesn't work. うる is really a fossilized 連体形 of the classical Japanese (auxiliary) 下二段活用 verb う, which in negative would be えぬ・えず. In modern Japanese 下二段活用 verbs turned into 下一段活用 verbs, i.e. える with negative えない. In short, える and うる are really the same verb, the latter is just a fossilized archaic conjugation. Negative is the same for both.
Mar
29
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
読書 is also a noun by itself, but according to Chocolate, 読書に行く is not possible. My question is when it is possible and when it is not.
Mar
29
comment When are へ and に used together?
@Flaw Done japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/5134/…
Mar
29
asked When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
Mar
28
comment When are へ and に used together?
I don't think it's a typo. せんたくに sounds OK to me, and looking up the fable 桃太郎, which I think this is from, this is the usual formulation. I'm just wondering why you can omit it, since it doesn't seem to be a general rule
Mar
28
comment When are へ and に used together?
I don't know if this is what OP is asking, but why is it せんたくに, not せんたくしに? I don't think it's always allowed to omit the し in しに, for example, saying 勉強に帰る instead of 勉強しに帰る sounds strange.
Mar
28
comment Does subject marker が always have to be before the conjugated verb?
If you're asking if you can omit the が in your example sentence, the answer is no.
Mar
28
comment Does subject marker が always have to be before the conjugated verb?
Instead of what? 私はいました is a correct sentence, but means something else. 私、いました and maybe even いました、私 are heard in speech, although not correct by the strictest of measures. Again, it's not very clear what you are asking.