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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Mar
11
comment What does “さ” means in 探偵さ?
@sawa ね is gender-neutral. Omitting copula before it is feminine, though.
Mar
10
comment Is there a general/default word for “to wear”?
@istrasci Good point. Only works in relative clauses, though.
Mar
9
answered Is there a general/default word for “to wear”?
Mar
9
answered Less-approximate and more-approximate forms of loan words
Mar
8
answered Different transcriptions for words with related origin
Mar
8
comment relative clauses without verbs
アナタがピンチの時 is a subordinate clause as you say, but I think OP is referring to the relative/appositive/adjectival (not sure how/if these are distinguished) clause アナタがピンチの, which modifies 時
Mar
8
comment Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
Great writeup and links, thank you! I would probably put both of the sentences under the 現象描写文タイプ category.
Mar
8
accepted Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
Mar
7
revised What is the formula to say “I'm trying to do X regularly”?
added 4 characters in body
Mar
7
answered What is the formula to say “I'm trying to do X regularly”?
Mar
7
comment Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
Ah, answer to my own comment... According to meta.japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/312/…, linguistics are OK as long as it's Japanese linguistics
Mar
7
comment Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
I'm beginning to wonder myself whether this question should be migrated to linguistics.stackexchange.com. I'm not really confused about the usage of these constructions, merely about the grammatical/linguistic analysis of them. Not sure what the policy is for questions about Japanese linguistics. On one hand they're not really about usage, on the other hand I'm worried that they would be too Japanese-centric for linguistics.stackexchange.com.
Mar
7
comment Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
@sawa "Your translations are wrong”. Which translations? If ピンチだ means "be in a crisis", so would e.g. 危機だ. I am asking for the mechanism or pattern that takes nounだ and gives it e.g. the meaning be in a noun. Also, I am well aware of the use of が as a focus marker, but common analysis restricts the focus given by が to subjects. For example you cannot say × りんごが食べた if you intend it to mean "It is the apple that I ate". Besides, が in 明日が雨だったら does not necessarily mark focus, so focus marking does not really seem relevant.
Mar
7
revised Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
added 5 characters in body
Mar
7
asked Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
Mar
5
answered relative clauses without verbs
Mar
5
comment relative clauses without verbs
@gibbon "あなた being the subject of ピンチの時" and no verb? Also 厳しいでしたか is ungrammatical. Do you mean 厳しかったですか?
Mar
2
comment ~たい forms of double-subject sentences
I don't disagree, like @Matt I'm just curious about how to analyze it grammatically, which is why I was hoping for sources. Please do not get me wrong, I value your input anyway, but it just doesn't quite make sense to me yet.
Mar
2
revised ~たい forms of double-subject sentences
asking for extra explanation
Mar
2
comment ~たい forms of double-subject sentences
Interesting... so if according to your explanation, "髪が長くなりたい" is towards the ungrammatical side, and "長い髪が欲しい" is unnatural, what is the most idiomatic way to say "I want long hair"? Is it then necessary to rewrite to 髪を長くしたい or 髪を伸ばしたい? As for the alienable-inalienable distiction, I've seen it used for the double-subject contruction itself, i.e. ("彼は髪が長い" grammatical) versus ("?彼は本が厚い" less grammatical), but never for the ~たい construction. Do you have any sources to share?