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Sep
4
answered Using “ha” instead of “wa” with QWERTY keyboards
Aug
30
reviewed Reject homonyms tag wiki excerpt
Aug
30
reviewed Reject homonyms tag wiki
Aug
28
revised How to say “also” or “too”
minor grammar fixes
Aug
28
comment What does the construction “passive voice + ままに” mean? (~{ら}れるままに)
@SomethingJapanese 言われるまま is definitely ongoing. 通り is similar as you say, but focuses on following the orders to the point, whereas まま focuses on not making objections.
Aug
28
comment What does the construction “passive voice + ままに” mean? (~{ら}れるままに)
@user1205935, not at all.
Aug
28
answered What does the construction “passive voice + ままに” mean? (~{ら}れるままに)
Aug
28
comment Expressing desire of a third party using したいそうです
@TsuyoshiIto, would you say that's also the case for 留学したい「ん」です? Although I agree that the rule generally applies, I can think of situations (e.g. the third person is 身内 and you want to make a strong statement) where 姉は海外留学したいんです doesn't sound that unnatural to me.
Aug
27
comment How did 家, 手, and 士 come to be included in the names of professions?
@Tim, So do you have to be elite to be an 愛煙家? :P
Aug
24
comment Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
@taylor, what's not formal about the above rules? If you mean a complete grammar, I don't think it's easy to make one. Language evolution and the choice of kanji aren't predictable, these transformations aren't productive.
Aug
24
comment Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
@taylor, what do you mean by a transformational rule?
Aug
24
answered Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
Aug
23
comment Use of unit abbreviations in Japanese
30℃=摂氏30度. People would rarely say that in Japan, though, since Celcius is the default.
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
@jkerian, I'm not confusing the two, I'm saying that 送る is an action verb, i.e. the ている form expresses the progressive, not the perfective. But I'm losing confidence. Looking online and inquiring with other speakers, it seems some people would even use 食べている to mean "have eaten". This is not a natural use for me, but maybe I'm biased wrt. dialect and/or age group. Maybe I should ask another question about this from a diachronical/regional standpoint.
Aug
22
revised When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
deleted 92 characters in body
Aug
22
answered What is the つく used at the end of this sentence
Aug
22
answered When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
戸を閉めている does not mean "The door is closed." It can only mean "Sby is closing the door."
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Nope, @Flaw. 怖がる is not a change-of-state verb, but a progressive-action verb (not sure about the nomenclature). Therefore 怖がっている is present progressive (showing signs of..) whereas 怖がる is either future or habitual.
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Disagree with 1. Verbs ending in がる are non-stative, so the plain がる form expresses habituality or future tense. I don't think either fits the situation you describe. It should be がっている.