9,986 reputation
830
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 23 hours ago

I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Aug
28
comment What does the construction “passive voice + ままに” mean? (~{ら}れるままに)
@user1205935, not at all.
Aug
28
answered What does the construction “passive voice + ままに” mean? (~{ら}れるままに)
Aug
28
comment Expressing desire of a third party using したいそうです
@TsuyoshiIto, would you say that's also the case for 留学したい「ん」です? Although I agree that the rule generally applies, I can think of situations (e.g. the third person is 身内 and you want to make a strong statement) where 姉は海外留学したいんです doesn't sound that unnatural to me.
Aug
27
comment How did 家, 手, and 士 come to be included in the names of professions?
@Tim, So do you have to be elite to be an 愛煙家? :P
Aug
24
comment Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
@taylor, what's not formal about the above rules? If you mean a complete grammar, I don't think it's easy to make one. Language evolution and the choice of kanji aren't predictable, these transformations aren't productive.
Aug
24
comment Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
@taylor, what do you mean by a transformational rule?
Aug
24
answered Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
Aug
23
comment Use of unit abbreviations in Japanese
30℃=摂氏30度. People would rarely say that in Japan, though, since Celcius is the default.
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
@jkerian, I'm not confusing the two, I'm saying that 送る is an action verb, i.e. the ている form expresses the progressive, not the perfective. But I'm losing confidence. Looking online and inquiring with other speakers, it seems some people would even use 食べている to mean "have eaten". This is not a natural use for me, but maybe I'm biased wrt. dialect and/or age group. Maybe I should ask another question about this from a diachronical/regional standpoint.
Aug
22
revised When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
deleted 92 characters in body
Aug
22
answered What is the つく used at the end of this sentence
Aug
22
answered When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
戸を閉めている does not mean "The door is closed." It can only mean "Sby is closing the door."
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Nope, @Flaw. 怖がる is not a change-of-state verb, but a progressive-action verb (not sure about the nomenclature). Therefore 怖がっている is present progressive (showing signs of..) whereas 怖がる is either future or habitual.
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Disagree with 1. Verbs ending in がる are non-stative, so the plain がる form expresses habituality or future tense. I don't think either fits the situation you describe. It should be がっている.
Aug
20
comment 得意とするところ explanation?
"得意にする" sounds very unnatural to me, unless maybe you mean something like "become good at".
Aug
20
answered Where does the word キレる come from?
Aug
18
comment List of Japanese counter words
@MarkHosang who decides what is correct or not if not the people using the language?
Aug
18
comment List of Japanese counter words
"+ 船 (sen) for ships". Really? Don't see this in the page you link to. Sure you don't mean 隻 or 艘?
Aug
18
revised Why do children call themselves by their name?
added 17 characters in body