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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


May
2
answered How can you figure out whether 鍵【かぎ】 means “lock” or “key”?
May
2
comment Can we have two thematic は particles in a sentence?
Just curious... do we have any "authoritative" sources saying multiple はs are wrong? It might be considered bad style, but downright wrong? rate.livedoor.biz/archives/50375900.html
May
2
revised Is there a difference between んがため and ために?
added 43 characters in body
May
2
answered Is there a difference between んがため and ために?
Apr
26
answered What differences, if any, are there between 婦 and 女?
Apr
26
comment Who decides what katakana will be used to form English loan words?
Not sure I understand the "tuna" example... why would it be "tsuna"?
Apr
26
revised Why is 「この人」 sometimes pronounced like 「このしと」?
added 314 characters in body
Apr
26
answered Why is 「この人」 sometimes pronounced like 「このしと」?
Apr
26
comment What is the difference between 見える/聞こえる and 見られる/聞ける?
I think it's safe to say that for all Modern Japanese purposes, 見る and 見える can be (re)analyzed as two different verbs. I would say they are a transitive-intransitive pair, as in 切る-切れる etc. In terms of Classical Japanese, aren't 見る and 見ゆ also two different verbs, or am I mistaken? There is some regularity to these transitive-intransitive pairs, but I'm not sure if it's ever been completely productive/regular. For example in 止める-止む, the verb with the -er- is the transitive one, unlike 切る-切れる。
Apr
26
comment Conjugation of いけない or いける?
Might wanna take a look at japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/4746/… as well.
Apr
25
revised Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
edited body
Apr
25
answered Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
Apr
25
comment Can you use multiple を in one sentence?
Only one を per sentence is definitely not a rule. One per clause, maybe. So the question is, is this two clauses with the verb dropped in the first one, or one clause with multiple objects... it seems more complicated than just combining objects with と or や, since there are different adverbial phrases hanging off the objects.
Apr
5
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
This sounds plausible (although maybe a bit fuzzy). So in the example from 桃太郎 in the linked question, 洗濯に行く works, because it is understood that grandma couldn't do laundry at home, and therefore had to go to the river...
Apr
4
comment When does a suru-noun require し in front of a purposive-に?
Yeah, 読書に行く does get quite a few google hits. Can you clarify "depends on the meaning"? So are there any guidelines or do you need to memorize on a word by word basis?
Apr
3
comment What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
@ジョン I think it's rare to ask a question with a negative verb (wihtout んです) unless you have the expectation/invitation aspect. If it's a neutral question, I would just ask 空いていますか. If there's a contextual clue that the other person is not hungry, I would ask 空いていないんですか. But I guess in other situations it's possible, e.g. a mother scolding her child: 「先生はまっすぐ帰れって言わなかった?」「うん、言わなかった」But then, 「うん、言った」doesn't sound completely wrong to me either. Yes, repeating the verb is very common.
Apr
3
answered “乗せる” vs “乗っける”
Apr
2
comment What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
I disagree. I would reply はい、空いています to your question. See also my answer. In all situations I can think of, you would be asking this question because either you're hungry yourself, asking for agreement, or you have reason to expect that the other person is hungry, and maybe you're inviting them to eat something.
Apr
2
answered What's the difference between いいえ and English's “no”?
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Question