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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Jul
28
comment 「~てはいただけません」- Why the は?
possible duplicate of Why is the topic marker often used in negative statements (ではない, ~とは思わない)?
Jul
21
comment Some Japanese dictionaries (e.g. 大辞林, 大辞泉, and 明鏡国語辞典) use this inverted triangle outline symbol (▽) for some kanji compounds. What does it mean?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about specific conventions in specific dictionaries, not about the Japanese language.
Jul
18
comment 私は猫が好き and 猫は私が好き
These are the default interpretations, and probably good enough since OP is a beginner. However, 1 can also mean "cats like me", and 2 can also mean "I like cats" (In the right context with the right prosody)
Jul
16
answered Is “先生 / せんせい / sensei” haughty or overly-formal
Jul
16
comment Is the 'h' in Japanese pronounced the same as the 'f'?
"For other speakers, the ɸ>h sound change is complete". You mean for certain dialects? I haven't noticed this in standard Japanese, and FWIW, it's not mentioned here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_phonology
Jul
16
revised What does adding お at the end of a word change?
edited title
Jul
16
answered Does the use of 予 such as in 猶予 to mean “in advance” have any precedent in Chinese?
Jul
15
comment Can you say “よい夢へ” instead of “よい夢を”?
@user312440, "The only rule that is always true in English is that every sentence must have a verb." That cannot be true. Even if you relax this and say that it's a rule of English, this would mean that you don't consider "Sweet dreams!" a sentence, and so, the rule is irrelevant for this discussion.
Jul
14
comment What does よいではないか mean?
I took the liberty of replacing "No problem, no problem" since it seemed a bit off. "No problem" is usually used to reply to thanks or apologies.
Jul
14
revised What does よいではないか mean?
edited body
Jul
14
comment Valid interpretations of the (first) て-form in 何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。
@Svante, 成り立つ is a change-of-state verb (or whatever your preferred nomenclature is), so the perfective state-of-having-been-built is 成り立っている. 成り立つ could be used as a habitual.
Jul
10
comment Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
@ThomasGross, any sources for your rule that counterfactual expressions require the past tense? There is no such rule, and Naruto seems to agree with me in his example 仮に公園に行くなら、何をすると思いますか?
Jul
10
comment Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
That's because 行った is not past tense, it's perfective aspect. What will you do after having gone to the park. 死んだら何する?doesn't work because you cannot do anything after having died.
Jul
10
comment Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
@virmaior, the semantic difference between "If I play, I win" and "If I played, I'd win" is that the latter is counterfactual, i.e. I don't play. The grammatical difference is only in verb forms, at least if you agree to call "would win" a form of "win".
Jul
10
comment Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
@ThomasGross, I would say 行った does not express counterfactuality, it expresses aspect. 行ったら何する? has no counterfactual conditional, it can even express future tense, the point is that 行った is perfective aspect in relation to the する.
Jul
10
comment Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
@virmaior, I'm not talking about how to express conditionals, I'm talking about how to express counterfactual conditionals. Japanese cannot do that with verb forms, or to be more precise, the conditionality might be expressed by a verb form, but the counterfactuality is not expressed by a verb form.
Jul
9
answered Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
Jul
9
comment What is a word for “participation” that resembles “kameseru”?
That is not the only confused Japanese in that article. What is 外面九天??? 遅出 exists as a word, but doesn't carry the nuance of being later than you're supposed to. 遅刻 is probably the word he's looking for.
Jul
9
comment Particle の in this sentence
@snailboat, great find, thanks! It's nice to see that some of the theories that I pull out of my wazoo as a mere hobby linguist aren't completely off. (Although I guess the conclusion is that these compounds are, in a way, words after all)
Jul
9
comment Differences between the many words for dinner
@小太郎, formality and politeness are not the same. ~食 is formal (not very, but a bit), i.e. you'd see it in newspapers etc. ~ご飯 is polite (although almost neutral) but not formal, and would therefore be more common in speech. These dimensions have some correlation, but are slightly different in nature.