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Sep
24
comment Is 〜たち used for groups of only two people?
Can you clarify when 親 is used as an actual parent? 親に反対された sounds like an actual parent to me. Can you give examples of rude usages of 親?
Sep
15
comment Is it okay to use つ counting for everything?
Off topic: it's much more natural to use 2匹 adverbially, e.g. 子猫を2匹.
Sep
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
comment How did we get “Foreign Carrot Regime”?
Hilarious, I hadn't seen this one before. Where is it from?
Aug
18
comment ございます - Humble or neutral?
I've sometimes seen it called "super-polite". As such, it's in the teineigo-spectrum, not the sonkeigo/kenjougo-spectrum.
Aug
10
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
10
comment Having troubles understanding aspect in Japanese (unclear word choice in this sentence written by native)
Not sure if you speak English natively, but if you do, would you also consider "returned home on foot" in that place wrong? Or just unnatural?
Aug
10
comment Having troubles understanding aspect in Japanese (unclear word choice in this sentence written by native)
@Aleksander, I understand your reason 2, but not your reason 1. In English, "(had) walked the long way home" is fine, just as "was walking the long way home" is.
Jul
17
comment 「聞こえなくなった」 or 「聞けなくなった」?
This doesn't really answer anything. According to this explanation, if A says something, and B wants to say "I can't hear you", which one would B use?
Jul
16
comment Does the Japanese equivalent of a lengthy combination of hyphenated English words exist?
I don't understand why you are talking about nominalization. "not-technically-in-a-recession" is used an adjective.
Jul
8
comment Difference between だの and など/とか
What leads you to think it might have "fallen out of fashion"?
Jul
8
comment 犬と猫が好き or 犬も猫も好き, which one is correct?
犬や猫が好き is another option.
Jul
7
comment Using 尊敬語・謙譲語 but not 丁寧語 on the same target
I would say that both of your theories are - or could be - correct. I would describe 尊敬語/謙譲語 without 丁寧語 as "friendly, but respectful", but as you've already guessed, there are lots of subtle implications. I can imagine upper-class madams speaking in this way, although this might be mostly a stylized way to depict such madams. I don't think many young people use this way of speaking regularly.
Jul
3
comment When to use べき and when to use べし
@eltonjohn, well, I was talking about べし in this particular form. I didn't really touch upon 連用 usages, and I agree that べく is used productively as a slightly archaic/literary alternative for ために (or something like that). すべく in particular is definitely fossilized, since the す instead of する is archaic.
Jul
1
comment て form followed by て, 「見てて」
What was the toy? I assume the kid wants the father to watch him/her play with it, not just quickly glance at the toy.
Jul
1
comment て form followed by て, 「見てて」
"in the case of 見てて, this interpretation seems odd when all that's needed is a quick glance", what's the situation? If indeed all that's needed is a quick glance, 見てて is weird. 見てて implies "keep watching" (e.g. "... me, while I do bla bla")
Jul
1
comment て form followed by て, 「見てて」
出てて is possible, but means something like "go out and stay outside". You're possibly talking about 出てって, a contraction of 出て行って. 待ってて is unnatural for the translation you give, it means something like "wait (for me) here". First one is resultative, second one is continuous.
Jun
30
answered When to use べき and when to use べし