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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Jul
9
answered Is there a special way of asking hypothetical questions?
Jul
9
comment What is a word for “participation” that resembles “kameseru”?
That is not the only confused Japanese in that article. What is 外面九天??? 遅出 exists as a word, but doesn't carry the nuance of being later than you're supposed to. 遅刻 is probably the word he's looking for.
Jul
9
comment Particle の in this sentence
@snailboat, great find, thanks! It's nice to see that some of the theories that I pull out of my wazoo as a mere hobby linguist aren't completely off. (Although I guess the conclusion is that these compounds are, in a way, words after all)
Jul
9
comment Differences between the many words for dinner
@小太郎, formality and politeness are not the same. ~食 is formal (not very, but a bit), i.e. you'd see it in newspapers etc. ~ご飯 is polite (although almost neutral) but not formal, and would therefore be more common in speech. These dimensions have some correlation, but are slightly different in nature.
Jul
8
comment 「どこでもある」と「どこにもある」の使い分け
Nice answer! I think I find どこにも for positive sentences slightly marked, though. どこにも to me has negative polarity. After 「いつも車でどこ行くの?」,「どこにも…」is understood to mean どこにも行かない, and not とこにでも行く. Also one observation: polarity often depends on pronunciation. ど↓こも has positive polarity, どこも (no downstep) has negative polarity.
Jul
8
comment What is the etymology behind る in 日{ひ}/昼{ひる} and 夜{よ}/夜{よる}?
This page says -ru expresses 状態, but not sure what its sources are www11.ocn.ne.jp/~jin/GOG-3.htm
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
revised Particle の in this sentence
added 1 character in body
Jul
1
answered Particle の in this sentence
Jun
16
comment How to read 連体形 + 上
Maybe I'm not familiar with the term "dictionary form". So クラウド is not a dictionary form?
Jun
16
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
@Choko, actually, it might be more きれかった than きれくない. Googling, I definitely see pages suggesting that it's 関西弁 or 大阪弁, e.g. nanapi.jp/51230
Jun
16
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
@Choko, yes, she still uses it. She's in her 60's so she's definitely not a 若者, but she left Japan when she was in her 30's, maybe it was a 若者言葉 back then.
Jun
16
comment In what ways do Japanese children overgeneralize conjugation patterns?
@Choko, my mother (a native) uses きれくない. I think maybe it's a dialectal thing.
Jun
13
answered 住んでいたい and 住みたい
Jun
12
comment Verb classification of honorific/humble verbs
@EiríkrÚtlendi, as I said I've lost faith in my theory, but my train of thinking was that it was these 5 verbs, exactly because they are used for 敬語. When the power shifted, the Eastern language was "unrefined" and lacked honorific speak, so it's natural that 敬語 expressions were imported from Western dialects (just like the よろしゅう-renyokei still used in よろしゅうございます). Now, as you say, ます is a later innovation, so that is a good counterargument to my theory. So it would be interesting to know whether ござい etc. were used as renyokei in any other contexts.
Jun
11
comment Origin of -aru verbs: いらっしゃる、おっしゃる、くださる、なさる
"beginning with a voiced obstruent, something no native verb does" How about だまる, is that not native?
Jun
11
comment Verb classification of honorific/humble verbs
@EiríkrÚtlendi, after googling some more, I'm losing faith in my own theory... however, not sure what your point is? It's possible that the regular Eastern form was in competition with the established Western form, and eventually lost, no?
Jun
10
comment ‥ができないと vs ‥はできないと
@YangMuye, sure, but the は-phrase can be hoisted from subject in the the conditional clause to topic of the whole sentence, i.e. かたづけは、できないと怪獣が出る, As for cleaning, if you can't do it, the monster appears.
Jun
10
comment Verb classification of honorific/humble verbs
My guess is that these are remnants of western dialect in the standard language from when the power shifted from West to East, similar to ありがとう,おはよう,ようこそ etc. instead of ありがたく,おはやく,よくこそ. But others probably know the details better than I do.
Jun
5
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
@EiríkrÚtlendi, also, ○○を分かろうとする marks the object of understanding with を, so 分かろうとする obviously doesn't mean "try to be understood". So you have to ask yourself what makes more sense: verbs whose semantics (and transitivity) completely change in different forms, or verbs which just mark their arguments differently depending on the form. I definitely shave in the latter way.