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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Mar
25
comment What exactly does the grammatical form NがNなだけに mean?
Yeah, that explanation is useless. It means something like "At a time like this", or "Given the circumstances", hinting that the extreme/unusual time/circumstances call for extreme/unusual measures.
Mar
25
comment は and が in this sentence
Both は and が are acceptable here, but by using は, I feel there's a slight change of focus from the alloy itself to its applications. Some more context might be useful. Does the text go on to describe these applications in more detail?
Mar
25
comment When is 死に used to describe something is dead instead of 死んでいる or 死んだ?
"死んだ人 isn't entirely unheard of" gives a false impression. 死ぬ with people is very commonly used. It's just that euphemisms are often used when addressing someone directly affected by the death or when showing respect to the deceased. Similar to English "die" vs "pass away".
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
Right, and neither is が. I think it makes more sense to say that either が or を can mark objects of stative verbs than to say that 食べたい can either mean "want to eat" or "is the object of desire to eat" or some such.
Mar
21
answered Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
In listings like that, you can't really expect full sentences. In this case, it's explaining the meaning of a noun with a noun phrase.
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
"his feelings take が and are therefore the subject". Do textbooks really teach that? How do they explain りんごが食べたい? 食べたい means "to be the object of desire to eat" or something?
Mar
21
comment あなたがこの文のおかしいと思うところは?
Interesting question, but I think you could improve it by explaining what you find strange about the sentences. How do you attempt to parse them? Do you interpret the の as possessive-の or relative-clause-が-turned-の? Is the reason you want to move あなたが that that would allow you to parse the の as a possessive の?
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
To elaborate: cross-linguistically, "potential" is often used to describe a mood indicating that something "is likely", but for Japanese, it's mostly used for える・れる, which describes CAPABILITY.
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
I'm confused. "It is possible" is not usually expressed by える・れる in modern Japanese. By "potential", do you mean this specific auxiliary verb, or are you talking about a broader category?
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
“It is possible that she may make you eat her cooking”. Where's the passive here?
Mar
20
comment Modifying adjectives: カンペキ [に or な?] 思ったとおりの仕上がり
@Kaji, it's being used as an adverb to modify the verb, な (copula rentaikei).
Mar
20
comment Modifying adjectives: カンペキ [に or な?] 思ったとおりの仕上がり
This is the best answer. It's 完璧に (an adverb), not 完璧な (an adjective) because it's not a "perfect result" but "a result which matches expectations perfectly"
Mar
20
answered meaning of て-form + られない
Mar
20
comment 心配なく surely it should be 心配ない?
@snailboat, props for quick corpus access. Yeah, informal dialogue is the only place I can think of where leaving the ご out seems natural. In this context, which looks like a manual or a commercial blurb, less so, even though it's probably purposely using an informal style.
Mar
20
comment meaning of て-form + られない
@TokyoNagoya, the common interpretation of 死んでいる is that it's a perfective, not a progressive, so you might need to explain. (I'm not saying I disagree, by the way).
Mar
20
comment 心配なく surely it should be 心配ない?
@virmaior, well, nobody is really addressing the question of whether this is idiomatic without the ご. I personally think it looks a bit out of place here without the ご.
Mar
12
comment The meaning of く
新しく is definitely used adverbially here, although you can argue that it isn't always, e.g. 家は新しく、車は古い. Whether 新しく can be an adverb or not is really a silly discussion, since it all depends on whether you classify it as its POS (part of speech) or classify it with its root lexeme. I think TokyoNagoya's point is that "new" and "newly" are 2 different words (lexemes), but 新しい and 新しい are the same lexeme. Again, this is just a matter of definitions. "-ly" in English is very productive (i.e. regular), but not quite as much as "-く".
Mar
3
comment Dajare no “dake ni”
On the contrary, it means "as can/might be expected". Even in your example "it was a big shock BECAUSE it wasn't expected"
Mar
3
comment Particle は replacing を - where does the stress lie?
Topic and focus are not the same.