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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Sep
24
comment Help with the difference between causative and the causative-passive for the verb 笑う
Ahh, you're twisting my words. 彼の冗談が私を笑わせた sounds completely natural to me too, I chose は because the が might be interpreted as exhaustive. Why do you think 冗談 can't be the subject? Because it's inanimate? google.co.jp/… Google gives lots of examples of {話,痛み,発想,告白,滑稽さ}が私を笑わせた. Why not 冗談?
Sep
24
comment How to choose between 「いれる」 and 「はいれる」?
@user1205935, got any support for your reading of 立ち入った? I have never heard this read in any other way than たちいった.
Sep
22
comment what is the past tense of お腹が空いた?
@TsuyoshiIto, good point (in your comment)... that reminds me of the question japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/6538/… There is definitely some complicated tense/aspect/person interplay going on...
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
21
comment この道をまっすぐ行ってください。 Why を and not で?
で can also mean "from", e.g. 家を出る/去る
Sep
21
comment Help with the difference between causative and the causative-passive for the verb 笑う
"You can't say 冗談が私を笑わせた。" I disagree. 彼の冗談は私を笑わせた sounds completely natural to me. The point of the passive is not to avoid 冗談 being the subject, but to add the nuance of involuntariness, as Teno's answer suggests.
Sep
18
comment Equivalence of Traversal Verb + て and で of Means/Instrumentality
Good answer, but I think the choice of 行ってくる could be better, since it's possible to interpret as a "connecting" use. E.g. お箸を使って食べる or OPs 歩いて行く might be more illustrative.
Sep
18
comment A polite way to say “ this person”
@user1205935, "use nothing" is an alternative, but the space deixis is lost. That's not the case with こちら.
Sep
15
comment Difference between 切る and 切れる?
For (1), just because a verb is transitive, it doesn't necessarily need an object. Yes, (2) and (3) are intransitive, just like 困る and 疲れる are intransitive.
Sep
15
comment Difference between 切る and 切れる?
言い切れるis the potential of 言い切る, 切れる is both an intransitive verb and the potential of the transitive verb 切る.
Sep
13
answered Any rules for a suffix on english words?
Sep
12
comment Why is it なさそう and not なそう
@Axioplase, that might be a thread worth following, but it doesn't explain why it's not なひそう or ないそう, also it doesn't explain よさそう and うさそう.
Sep
12
comment Why is it なさそう and not なそう
So do you say 濃さそう or 濃そう? I believe the last form is the more common, contradicting your rule.
Sep
12
awarded  grammar
Sep
11
comment What forms of verbs (potential or passive) are more frequent in Japanese?
@JesseGood, I'd like to write an answer, but I kinda lost confidence now. Researching a bit, it seems that originally the Japanese passive was mostly used as the "passive of inconvenience" as in 財布を盗まれた, but is used more neutrally now because of western influence. It's a bit hard to see the full picture...
Sep
11
comment What forms of verbs (potential or passive) are more frequent in Japanese?
I think you have a point that passives are less common than in English for inanimate patients. But that is probably not the case for animate patients. 言われた、怒られた etc are very common with animate subjects. Constructs like 行かされた are also very common, more than English "was made go" "was told to go" etc.
Sep
11
comment What forms of verbs (potential or passive) are more frequent in Japanese?
"the standard dialect (東京弁)". So are you saying that 東京弁=標準語?
Sep
11
comment What forms of verbs (potential or passive) are more frequent in Japanese?
This question might be of interest japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/4588/…
Sep
10
comment Etymology and usage of 凸待ち
@ZhenLin, many IMEs reorder choices according to what you use the most.
Sep
4
comment When is 着ける used in context of clothes? (eg in comparison to 着る, する、履く)
On top of user1205935's 巻く, 被{かぶ}る is usually used for hats and はめる for gloves. I might be missing others too.