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seen Jul 25 at 7:38

I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Oct
4
comment How does the use of いかんによっては in this question determine one answer over another?
It's correct that は is the key. But something doesn't quite make sense. 休みです doesn't mean "it may be a holiday". In fact, the は is the very thing creating the "depending on". Without it, the sentence could mean "As a result of the course of the typhoon, it will be a holiday".
Oct
3
comment What's the difference between 上る、登る and 昇る?
@Jeemusu, 上がる focuses slightly more on the endpoint, 上る slightly more on the path. But 階段を上る isn't uncommon at all, so it's fine to have it in the examples.
Oct
2
comment What しかりだ does mean?
@TsuyoshiIto. Yes, I realize you are right. I think I was thrown off because I've only seen it used as ~も(また)しかりだ
Oct
1
comment What しかりだ does mean?
You said "they (the silver and bronze saints) are just like gold saints". It's the other way around.
Oct
1
comment What しかりだ does mean?
I would say that the "although" applies to the "gold saints" more than the "12". Basically, although they are gold saints (which I assume to be high in rank than silver and bronze), they're just like silver and bronze saints, because they're young.
Oct
1
comment What しかりだ does mean?
Nope, the gold saints (which I assume to be higher in rank than silver and bronze saints) are just like silver and bronze saints because they're young.
Oct
1
comment Except for pitch, what are the differences in pronunciation between Kansaiben and Tokyoben?
The OP is not asking about vocab or grammar, but explicitly about "differences in pronunciation".
Oct
1
comment How do I write an foreign name that ends with consonant?
'In general words ending in a "sh" sound use the "shi" kana'. This isn't right. "ッシュ" is much more common, although there might be examples of "シ" (can't think of any, though).
Oct
1
comment How do I write an foreign name that ends with consonant?
There aren't any strict rules, but much more common transcriptions are for Erik, Ash, and Robert would be エリック, アッシュ and ロバート. Not sure where you get ロマート from, that seems highly improvised.
Sep
28
comment What is the breakdown of countries where loan words originate?
Percentage in terms of frequency or in terms of sheer vocab size? Loanwords from Dutch and Portuguese are a fairly closed class, whereas loanwords from English and to some extent French are a more open class.
Sep
24
comment Help with the difference between causative and the causative-passive for the verb 笑う
Ahh, you're twisting my words. 彼の冗談が私を笑わせた sounds completely natural to me too, I chose は because the が might be interpreted as exhaustive. Why do you think 冗談 can't be the subject? Because it's inanimate? google.co.jp/… Google gives lots of examples of {話,痛み,発想,告白,滑稽さ}が私を笑わせた. Why not 冗談?
Sep
24
comment How to choose between 「いれる」 and 「はいれる」?
@user1205935, got any support for your reading of 立ち入った? I have never heard this read in any other way than たちいった.
Sep
22
comment what is the past tense of お腹が空いた?
@TsuyoshiIto, good point (in your comment)... that reminds me of the question japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/6538/… There is definitely some complicated tense/aspect/person interplay going on...
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
21
comment この道をまっすぐ行ってください。 Why を and not で?
で can also mean "from", e.g. 家を出る/去る
Sep
21
comment Help with the difference between causative and the causative-passive for the verb 笑う
"You can't say 冗談が私を笑わせた。" I disagree. 彼の冗談は私を笑わせた sounds completely natural to me. The point of the passive is not to avoid 冗談 being the subject, but to add the nuance of involuntariness, as Teno's answer suggests.
Sep
18
comment Equivalence of Traversal Verb + て and で of Means/Instrumentality
Good answer, but I think the choice of 行ってくる could be better, since it's possible to interpret as a "connecting" use. E.g. お箸を使って食べる or OPs 歩いて行く might be more illustrative.
Sep
18
comment A polite way to say “ this person”
@user1205935, "use nothing" is an alternative, but the space deixis is lost. That's not the case with こちら.
Sep
15
comment Difference between 切る and 切れる?
For (1), just because a verb is transitive, it doesn't necessarily need an object. Yes, (2) and (3) are intransitive, just like 困る and 疲れる are intransitive.
Sep
15
comment Difference between 切る and 切れる?
言い切れるis the potential of 言い切る, 切れる is both an intransitive verb and the potential of the transitive verb 切る.